Jump to content

Ubon Ratchathani News & Development


Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...
  • Replies 778
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

The airport has metered taxis now. http://guideubon.com/news/view.php?t=44&s_id=17&d_id=16 Sent from my iPhone using ThaiVisa app

Any further and we will have to get a Lao visa to do our 90 day reports.

That is good news Bergen, thanks for the heads up. A friend sent me this story in the Australian mainstream press which made me chuckle in more ways then one. http://www.traveller.com.au/ubon-ratcha

Posted Images

15 hours ago, Mike45 said:

I heard that the Opening Ceremony for the Immigration office in Muang Ubon Ratchathani will be be July 4th.

Opened yesterday.

Ceremony today at 10Am. 

There is an ongoing topic about the new office on this forum.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For those who wonder why every place has Muang It means the Center .Havent lived there for Years, but am told where Trans Am lives by the Lake has DesRes ,and peaceful newer property.?


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

Link to post
Share on other sites

Being a pedant I would say that:

 

  • a more accurate translation of meuang is probably "municipality" or town/city, rather than any marker of geographical characteristic
  • there are three reservoirs (not lakes) of substance in Meuang Ubon - Huai Wang Nong, Huai Meuang and Huai Nong Bua

But we all know what you mean! Most falang talk about Huai Wang Nong as being 'the lake' and indeed it is home to some des res and is mostly quiet, so Trans Am is a lucky guy if he lives around there. Also home to a falang bar/restaurant, a lot of popular evening/weekend Thai restaurants and the inevitable few 'fairy light' establishments.

 

Ubon hash has hashed nearly every inch of the place over its 9 year history - I could navigate it blindfold!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SantiSuk said:

Being a pedant I would say that:

 

  • a more accurate translation of meuang is probably "municipality" or town/city, rather than any marker of geographical characteristic
  • there are three reservoirs (not lakes) of substance in Meuang Ubon - Huai Wang Nong, Huai Meuang and Huai Nong Bua

But we all know what you mean! Most falang talk about Huai Wang Nong as being 'the lake' and indeed it is home to some des res and is mostly quiet, so Trans Am is a lucky guy if he lives around there. Also home to a falang bar/restaurant, a lot of popular evening/weekend Thai restaurants and the inevitable few 'fairy light' establishments.

 

Ubon hash has hashed nearly every inch of the place over its 9 year history - I could navigate it blindfold!

Just to split hairs, "muang" would quite possibly be translated as town also centre. One could argue that "Nakorn" could be translated as town. Definitely not city. That is "mahanakhon". Only one true city in Thailand and that is Bangkok. 

Edited by puchooay
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Noted - let's go for municipality then. Can't be 'Centre' surely, as a meuang is an administrative area that often/usually takes in outskirts/suburbs as well as the centre. But I'm no linguist, so I should probably shut the proverbial up!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Over the years, whenever huge amounts of water are released from the Lam Pao Dam and the Ubon Rat dam at Namphong, after about ten days of moving along the Chi river it ends up in the Mun river and causes severe flooding in Ubon Ratchathani city and Warin. This occurred in 2000, 2001, and 2002. I also remember way back in 1978, my wife had to get a boat down the road from the railway station to get across into the city. 

 

Since the severe floods at the turn of this century, we have not been tested again to the same extent. In those days there was no Central Plaza, no THE RIVER, no Ratchathani university, no Home Pro, no Thai Watsat Du. The swamp land was not raised. Now with all this land raised, where will the water go to? Probably between in and around Ubon Watsat Du, flood out the hotel there and all the shops across from Ubon Watsat Du. Back up in Huai Wang Nong. 

 

Maybe it will not be so bad now but if more heavy rain comes in late August-early September, as it usually does, then watch out then. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Land has been raised by excavating clay from other areas of the same flood plain I believe Michael. I think that particular aspect is probably a net nil situation, though that won't stop floodings like we had 4 years ago or maybe worse like you describe at turn of the century (wasn't here then).

 

It'll be some flood if it pushes back up into Huai Wang Nong. Even after the rains of last week and with huge flow coming out of HWN the level of the reservoir was still way above (at least 10 meters) the outfall river that winds its way down to the Mun by the big Cement works in the East of the town. I know cos last Friday I checked part of a trail I had earlier earmarked to run Ubon Hash House Harrriers along next Saturday only to find my chosen route was freshly inundated (maybe dry again now). HWN might overflow from water coming down into it from the north - not getting away quickly enough - but if it overflows from water pushing back up from the south then look out Ubon! - that means the river is 10+meters higher and the whole of Chinatown and mid town will be under a meter or two minimum of water.

Edited by SantiSuk
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, SantiSuk said:

Land has been raised by excavating clay from other areas of the same flood plain I believe Michael. I think that particular aspect is probably a net nil situation, though that won't stop floodings like we had 4 years ago or maybe worse like you describe at turn of the century (wasn't here then).

 

It'll be some flood if it pushes back up into Huai Wang Nong. Even after the rains of last week and with huge flow coming out of HWN the level of the reservoir was still way above (at least 10 meters) the outfall river that winds its way down to the Mun by the big Cement works in the East of the town. I know cos last Friday I checked part of a trail I had earlier earmarked to run Ubon Hash House Harrriers along next Saturday only to find my chosen route was freshly inundated (maybe dry again now). HWN might overflow from water coming down into it from the north - not getting away quickly enough - but if it overflows from water pushing back up from the south then look out Ubon! - that means the river is 10+meters higher and the whole of Chinatown and mid town will be under a meter or two minimum of water.

With all the land that has been raised over the last 15 years, goodness knows where the water will go. This is what happened before.

 

As the Mun river overflows, Baan Kud Duea goes under water (that is where all the flooding restaurants are).  The water floods all the land near the mouth of the little Mun river. This water creeps up just below the road down from the N'Joy restaurant. The road behind Ave Maria School goes under. Then the water floods all the land and the road in and around Do Home. The Ubonburi resort hotel goes under. The road between Warin and Ubon goes under. The No 3 bridge that crosses by the island is closed because the road on the Warin side goes under. The water creeps further around through the water-treatment plant and up almost to the LaiThong hotel. It will reach the Outside Inn and move up to the edge of Huai Wang Nong Lake. Water there gets trapped and can not flow out and so banks up to the north.

 

The under-the-road U turn in front of Ratchathani University and Central Plaza is now closed. Flooded. 

 

Whenever these big floods occur in Ubon the sun is shining. Always in October. No rain. The water comes downstream from opening the dams.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

"The No 3 bridge that crosses by the island is closed because the road on the Warin side goes under."

 

If you are talking about the stretch of road between the south end of No 3 bridge and southwards to the long bridge overpassing that 'bayou' before you climb up towards Warin Police Station, they raised that road by a meter or so 2 years ago. Dunno whether that's enough to keep Warin connected to Ubon. I wondered at the time why they were doing it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just went down to Huai Wang Nong to have a look. Not sure where your "10 metre" level comes from Santisuk. To my untrained eye (I am not an engineer), it looks about a 3 m drop at the most. Currently the water is pouring out through the gates and meeting the water below below, at a guess, about a 1 m drop. The gates are almost covered and the walkways in front of the lake embankment are also almost covered. Two massive diesel pumps are now on the road near the outlet gates. I presume the authorities know that the gates will be unable to cope with the water and thus the two pumps are there to help. Pump out water and pour it across the road. 

 

Now that big flooding is being reported in Roi-Et (Selaphum), I expect this water will wind its way down the Chi river, into the Mun river and reach Ubon about this time next week. 

 

I also think that this period of heavy rain is just the beginning of lots more to come later in August and into September. Watch out then.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My comment was based on an observation of 28 July, before the river came way up. 10m may be a bit of an exaggeration but if you check it out in dry season I think you'll find 10m is a closer estimate than 3!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...