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A Roast Dinner meaning: Roast beef or Lamb (can also be pork) with roast and boiled potatoes, 2-3 different types of veg, Yorkshire pudding and lashings of gravy. (Perhaps stuffing also) This is a meal which holds a special place in most Brits/Irish peoples hearts, although perhaps not eaten that often!

My question is; why do Thais not like it? I have spoken with many Thais who have tried it and all, in my experience, can't see what the fuss is about.

Any thoughts?

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A Roast Dinner meaning: Roast beef or Lamb (can also be pork) with roast and boiled potatoes, 2-3 different types of veg, Yorkshire pudding and lashings of gravy. (Perhaps stuffing also) This is a meal which holds a special place in most Brits/Irish peoples hearts, although perhaps not eaten that often!

My question is; why do Thais not like it? I have spoken with many Thais who have tried it and all, in my experience, can't see what the fuss is about.

Any thoughts?

Perhaps not a complete dinner as you show above but I've made a large pork roast and as soon as I would hand out one slice another plate was put out asking for more. That was mostly from the kids and was surprised how much they ate of it. However, it was along with standard Thai fare of rice, fish, fried veggies. I suspect it is more of the 'extras' they may have problems with (Yorkshire pudding definitely comes to mind). :o

And then of course is the issue that they did not grow up eating farang food and especially British food which is an acquired taste that even I have problems with. :D

Edited by tywais
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A Roast Dinner meaning: Roast beef or Lamb (can also be pork) with roast and boiled potatoes, 2-3 different types of veg, Yorkshire pudding and lashings of gravy. (Perhaps stuffing also) This is a meal which holds a special place in most Brits/Irish peoples hearts, although perhaps not eaten that often!

My question is; why do Thais not like it? I have spoken with many Thais who have tried it and all, in my experience, can't see what the fuss is about.

Any thoughts?

Not spicy!

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Apart from the lack of spice roast meals aren't communal. I've sat in a UK restaurant and watched a group of Japanese businessmen order various English-type meals (roasts, chops etc) and then put all the plates in the middle of the table and share the dishes as they would do back home.

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I don't know I've made Yankee Pot Roat several times and the Thai's seem to like it :o

What's a Yankee Pot Roast consist of?

"pot roast

n: Usually an inexpensive, less tender cut of beef that is first browned, then braised very slowly in a covered pot with a little liquid. The result is a flavorful, tender piece of meat. CHUCK or ROUND cuts are the most popular for this dish. The dish is called Yankee pot roast when vegetables are added to the pot partway through the cooking process. pot roast v. To cook meat by browning, then braising in a covered pot either on top of the stove or in the oven."

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Yep thats the one but I usually use tri tip, add some potatoes, carrots and onions, can be cooked with out an oven, nice cahnge from the normal foods around our house anyway. Were pretty much a 50/50 house with Thia and western food, the wife makes great mexican food. It seem to me the problem isn't that Thai's don't like western foods just most refuse to try it.

The kids seem to be absolutely agians trying it, but they seem to like hamburgers and fries.

They always go for the cakes somethign they are familair, oput a good pie in front of them doesn't look familar adn for the most part they won't even try it. I've seen several women who are going to the states saying they will only eat Thai food. I think they are going to get pretty hungry. Thai food is there but not like here and it's an imported food, so very expensive.

Really a shame no one has the market cornered on good food. I will admit it took me a while to get used to Thai food but in the end I would have missed some wonderful dishes had not kept trying

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I suppose a lot depends on if you have an oven (that helps).

My wife cooks on a 2 burner gas plate from the local village or on the charcoal grill.

Also if your family is so used to somtam and spicy foods etc a roast dinner has no real taste to it. Most western food is bland compared to spicy Thai food.

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The poster that said spicy probably said it best. I know that I've cooked a lot of farang food for my family. The biggest complaint or critical statements was either not spicy or sour. If you use tomato sauce or ketchup they will say sour.

I took those exact same recipes and chopped up about 3-4 of those tiny little red peppers in them and they loved the food. The first time I made a roast they tasted it and said sorry, but not spicy. I made the exact same thing later and asked them to taste it that time and they ate everything in the pan...

Those red peppers don't change the flavor they just add heat. They're not like a jalepeno pepper or bell pepper that add flavor, these don't at all. I've used them in fried potatoes, roast beef, roast beef with beer sauce and chili. My family liked the chili as well.

Give it a shot!

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A Roast Dinner meaning: Roast beef or Lamb (can also be pork) with roast and boiled potatoes, 2-3 different types of veg, Yorkshire pudding and lashings of gravy. (Perhaps stuffing also) This is a meal which holds a special place in most Brits/Irish peoples hearts, although perhaps not eaten that often!

My question is; why do Thais not like it? I have spoken with many Thais who have tried it and all, in my experience, can't see what the fuss is about.

Any thoughts?

Way back when I first took my Thai wife to England, she didn't think much of any western food, including roast dinnners. After a while she developed a taste, ended up being an excellent cook of farang food. Of course at home she would always spice up her own plate a bit, but if we went out to eat, she was quite content to eat without any chillies or chili sauces.. She grew to love roast dinners - at first she couldn't stand lamb , but was once obliged to eat it when we dined at my boss's house, and now roast lamb is one of her favourite dishes and she cooks it beautifully.

So there you go - it's all a matter of having an open mind and acquiring new tatses - just like we do with Thai food. :o

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However, it was along with standard Thai fare of rice, fish, fried veggies. I suspect it is more of the 'extras' they may have problems with (Yorkshire pudding definitely comes to mind). :o

And then of course is the issue that they did not grow up eating farang food and especially British food which is an acquired taste that even I have problems with. :D

I have to agree with this . I guess it's what you were brought up eatting .

To answer the OP , the Thai's I know , just don't like to wait that long for food . Cooking anything for more than 15 miniutes makes them crazy .

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I often cook a roast dinner either when I have Falang friends around or sometimes just for the family. My mother-in-law loves roast potatos and gravy, although she recons "flang" food is alright but you eat one and an hour or so later your hungry again :o.

I find its better to put all the food in bowls/plates and the gravy in a jug and let them help themselfs so you get the "comunal" eating bit. Everyone likes Lamb except my mother-in-law (she does'nt like beef either) so we usually have pork or chicken I've never tried making yorkshire puddings here. Caserole is an other fav but they usually eat it with rice :D

RC

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You know if I don't have those red chillis in my Thai food I don't like either :o , but it took some time to adjust to it. They go in our mexican food. The funny thing i my wife can not eat hot sauce from America says it's to hot :D It really is what your used to or take the time to develop a taste for.

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