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This is going to hurt you Brits but brace yourself for it: Few people outside GB like English food. :D

That won't hurt the Brits, I'm Irish and our Diet is very similar (except we eat 5 times the amounts of potato!) to the Brits. If someone doesn't like our roast beef - Tough! We love it... :o

I got married in Dublin and didn't see much rosbif...plenty of bacon and cabbage tho...in the days when the Clarence Hotel was not yet owned by Bono I got a 'mixed grill' from the restaurant on the ground floor...a full 4" pile of roasted and fried meats with loads of tatties and gravy...really sumpin' special...actually exceeded American portions served up in chop house places...

oh...(moan...) don't get me started on the Guiness...a more exquisite brew than what's served up in Dublin don't exist on the planet...I saw my cousin-in-law fire down 3 pints in 10 minutes...total maniac...as fast as the bar man could pull them(takes a few minutes as the pulling process is intricate)...

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This is going to hurt you Brits but brace yourself for it: Few people outside GB like English food. :D

That won't hurt the Brits, I'm Irish and our Diet is very similar (except we eat 5 times the amounts of potato!) to the Brits. If someone doesn't like our roast beef - Tough! We love it... :o

I got married in Dublin and didn't see much rosbif...plenty of bacon and cabbage tho...in the days when the Clarence Hotel was not yet owned by Bono I got a 'mixed grill' from the restaurant on the ground floor...a full 4" pile of roasted and fried meats with loads of tatties and gravy...really sumpin' special...actually exceeded American portions served up in chop house places...

oh...(moan...) don't get me started on the Guiness...a more exquisite brew than what's served up in Dublin don't exist on the planet...I saw my cousin-in-law fire down 3 pints in 10 minutes...total maniac...as fast as the bar man could pull them(takes a few minutes as the pulling process is intricate)...

You bring back fond memories! 3 pints of guiness in 10 mins was a standing order! And pulling a pint is an art.

If it's a long time since you've been to Dublin, don't go back, you won't recognise it. However, pop out into the countryside and you back in the good ole Emerald Isle!

Thanks for the nostalgia... :D

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This is going to hurt you Brits but brace yourself for it: Few people outside GB like English food. :D

That won't hurt the Brits, I'm Irish and our Diet is very similar (except we eat 5 times the amounts of potato!) to the Brits. If someone doesn't like our roast beef - Tough! We love it... :o

I got married in Dublin and didn't see much rosbif...plenty of bacon and cabbage tho...in the days when the Clarence Hotel was not yet owned by Bono I got a 'mixed grill' from the restaurant on the ground floor...a full 4" pile of roasted and fried meats with loads of tatties and gravy...really sumpin' special...actually exceeded American portions served up in chop house places...

oh...(moan...) don't get me started on the Guiness...a more exquisite brew than what's served up in Dublin don't exist on the planet...I saw my cousin-in-law fire down 3 pints in 10 minutes...total maniac...as fast as the bar man could pull them(takes a few minutes as the pulling process is intricate)...

You bring back fond memories! 3 pints of guiness in 10 mins was a standing order! And pulling a pint is an art.

If it's a long time since you've been to Dublin, don't go back, you won't recognise it. However, pop out into the countryside and you back in the good ole Emerald Isle!

Thanks for the nostalgia... :D

it was 1988 when I was there...and yeah, I'm sure the place don't look the same. The ex-wife's folks are farmers from Co. Laoise and all the oldies that were my friends are dead now includin' ol' uncle Paddy... water diviner and ballroom dancer extraordinaire (could one find the same combination of talent elsewhere in the world?). I keep his one year death card in a special place in my home in Suphanburi...

All the best...

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This is going to hurt you Brits but brace yourself for it: Few people outside GB like English food. :D

We're never hurt when people don't like us. We're used to it :D:D:o

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Pork roast is my wife's favorite, along with carrots and spuds cooked and drowned in brown gravy.

penz...you gots to identify whats you mean by 'roast pork'. Do you mean a wrapped up loaf with string with fat for the cracklin on the top or just exposed pork shoulder? At Suphan tescos we gots pork loin...cylindrical strips suitable for one way ob cookin' but not the next.

Not far from our place in Suphan we gots a pork abbatoir wid lots of pigs squealing in terror at 0300 hrs when the knife goes in...you can hear them clearly. Then...you can see the carcasses being carried into the market an hour later. The pork roast that you and me know about is a flank cut, rolled up and tied but you don't get that except at fancy BKK markets. In the boonies you have a butcher covered with blood (usually the flies don't come out until 7-8 am) and an offering of large pieces of pork...all very tasty but not identifieable.

Most fresh pork is roastable and accompanied with a nice 'monster mash' (tots, parsnips and a swede with lots of marge and milk- freshly gound black pepper a must) would suit the palate of most skeptibile thais...put the nam pla and the chiles on the side. I also like brussels sprouts on the side when available. Thais don't like them much though...

tell us in detail about the pork that you roast

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This is going to hurt you Brits but brace yourself for it: Few people outside GB like English food. :D

That won't hurt the Brits, I'm Irish and our Diet is very similar (except we eat 5 times the amounts of potato!) to the Brits. If someone doesn't like our roast beef - Tough! We love it... :o

I got married in Dublin and didn't see much rosbif...plenty of bacon and cabbage tho...in the days when the Clarence Hotel was not yet owned by Bono I got a 'mixed grill' from the restaurant on the ground floor...a full 4" pile of roasted and fried meats with loads of tatties and gravy...really sumpin' special...actually exceeded American portions served up in chop house places...

oh...(moan...) don't get me started on the Guiness...a more exquisite brew than what's served up in Dublin don't exist on the planet...I saw my cousin-in-law fire down 3 pints in 10 minutes...total maniac...as fast as the bar man could pull them(takes a few minutes as the pulling process is intricate)...

You bring back fond memories! 3 pints of guiness in 10 mins was a standing order! And pulling a pint is an art.

If it's a long time since you've been to Dublin, don't go back, you won't recognise it. However, pop out into the countryside and you back in the good ole Emerald Isle!

Thanks for the nostalgia... :D

it was 1988 when I was there...and yeah, I'm sure the place don't look the same. The ex-wife's folks are farmers from Co. Laoise and all the oldies that were my friends are dead now includin' ol' uncle Paddy... water diviner and ballroom dancer extraordinaire (could one find the same combination of talent elsewhere in the world?). I keep his one year death card in a special place in my home in Suphanburi...

All the best...

It was 1988 when I left Dublin to go to Liverpool. I don't get back to Ireland much, but you're right, it was always a great place to find the most extraordinary characters! Best thing about them was that they didn't think they were anything out of the ordinary, just normal people. Now that's real eccentricity!

All the best to you too.

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A Roast Dinner meaning: Roast beef or Lamb (can also be pork) with roast and boiled potatoes, 2-3 different types of veg, Yorkshire pudding and lashings of gravy. (Perhaps stuffing also) This is a meal which holds a special place in most Brits/Irish peoples hearts, although perhaps not eaten that often!

My question is; why do Thais not like it? I have spoken with many Thais who have tried it and all, in my experience, can't see what the fuss is about.

Any thoughts?

What i find with most Thais is. If you suggest something different to eat. They will say."I don't like it"

My answer to them is. "have you tried it?" Which the usual response is."No!" So how do you know you dont like it? Seems many Thais are not quite as adventurous when it comes to food. My missus loves many western dishes. Loves her roast dinners. But not all the time. Just now and again. The Irish Exchange does a good lunch on a Sunday and also the Landmark. Nice!

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You know if I don't have those red chillis in my Thai food I don't like either :o , but it took some time to adjust to it. They go in our mexican food. The funny thing i my wife can not eat hot sauce from America says it's to hot :D It really is what your used to or take the time to develop a taste for.
My best friend from Thailand whom I've worked with in America and shared many Thai home cooked meals together got me hooked on the chilie's in the food and mints,curries etc. even though I was used to eating Mexican foods cause I do live in Texas. I brought the Haberneros and Jalapenos

over here to grow as well as some of those Insainety Sauces from the cauldrons of Satan with the Siberian Gensing. Yes, yourn wife is right about hot and I proved it to my B-in Law also...that stuff will put a 250 lb. Marine on his knees in the hog nam HaHA! boy was that some chilie Whew!!!!. The chilies are good and we grow alot of them and don't nuke you as bad as others ya know they have flavor and not that afterburner effect. My wife just cooks some mixed meals cause she knows that I don't wan't rice at every sitting so I got some potatoes with some cabbage and onions and boiled spareribs and I can make some cornbread with that and bake a cherry cheese cake and my neighbors will share. Spice it up if you like!!!

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Well alot of roast dinner has no taste.

When cooked wekk its great, maybe they tasted a shitty roast dinner and got turned off it.

My Gf loves it, but only from certain places and people.

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I can't believe no one has mentioned the weather.

Think about it. Back home, when the weather turns colder, our minds automatically turn to comfort food. All the types of food, back in the olden times, would warm our bellies and help us get though the cold winter - or even just though the night. You wouldn't necessarily go a roast during the summer though unless you were an Australian or Kiwi, celebrating Christmas, in Australia. And even then, you wouldn't touch a roast again until late May (Late Autumn in OZ).

Now, having grown up on it, those foods become associated with 'comfort' in the eye of your average anglo. When you eat it, especially in Thailand which is a relatively foreign environmnet for most expats, you are eating a roast just as much for 1) the taste as 2) the sense of wellbeing and homeliness it gives you, even if it is stinking 35 degrees outside.

Now given that the average Thai is at home in thailand, then 2) doesn't apply. Given that the average Thai's tastebuds are about as inflexible as the average anglo's, then a roast all of a sudden isn't the nicest meal to be had....bring on the Som Tum!

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A little help for the yank here what is marmite ?

A paste made from yeast excrement that Brits like to spread on toast.

Smells like dog doo. Probably tastes like dog doo too. :D

:D

Aussies/Kiwis love it too, least you forget. :o

That figures :D

No, they like Vegemite. But only a small quantity of people enjoy Bovril. My partner quite enjoys shepherd's pie, as well as steak and kidney pie.

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I'm with Samran on this one. In a climate where a heat source is essential to keep from getting frostbite on delicate pieces of anatomy it is easy and most efficient to use that same heat source for cooking. Long, slow cooking methods followed naturally. In a tropical climate the issue is cooking food without generating excessive heat. Thai cooking methods do this very well.

With the advent of slow cookers you can now do a slow-cooked meal without raising the inside temp to intolerable levels. But it's still a "heavy" meal, high in the fat and protein that take longest to digest. It's more suited to a chillier climate, where you need more sustained energy to maintain body temperature. If you aren't used to eating the high fat and protein content, it can leave you feeling faintly ill afterward.

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