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'hump' of beef........anyone tried it? and how to cook?


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I was in Makro today with the wife and noticed a sign for 'hump' of beef. There was a friendly, but non English speaking butcher nearby and I asked the wife to inquire about the hump. according to [reluctant] translation, the butcher says that is actually the hump of the locally grown Brahma and is quite tender, so I bought a 2 kilo roast @ 250/kilo and now wondering what I'm going to do with it........

any suggestions????

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Actually, the hump of the brahma cow or steer is mostly feet. I think the beef hump is actually a piece of the chuck.

the hump is mostly 'feet'?? maybe you mean fat?? The piece that I got today does look more like a chuck steak [little fat] and I reason that there is hardly any muscle in the hump, like most of the cow is full of......................maybe it might be tender and unless I stumble upon a recipe saying to cook it slow and long like a stew, I might take a chance and cook it as a med rare roast.

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maybe its a misprint should have read "lump" for 250bht a kilo i would cook it slow.

as for asking a butcher in makro,we asked him sunday do you have any ausi.beef steak?

the nod and yes showed the wf.nz.lamb.did by some nida beef mince for burgers,very,very tasty.

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Normally the hump is tough. You might want to think about marinating it for 18 hours before roasting. From years in the beef business in Thailand the only part of the brahman beef cow that can be consumed with out mechanical or chemical tenderizing is the tenderloin or fillet. Exception to those who have strong jaw muscles.

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Normally the hump is tough. You might want to think about marinating it for 18 hours before roasting. From years in the beef business in Thailand the only part of the brahman beef cow that can be consumed with out mechanical or chemical tenderizing is the tenderloin or fillet. Exception to those who have strong jaw muscles.

no problem with the jaw muscles but there's not many teeth attached.if the hump is a cheap cut and is cooked accordingly it should be tasty,what part of the cow is this cut?
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Normally the hump is tough. You might want to think about marinating it for 18 hours before roasting. From years in the beef business in Thailand the only part of the brahman beef cow that can be consumed with out mechanical or chemical tenderizing is the tenderloin or fillet. Exception to those who have strong jaw muscles.

no problem with the jaw muscles but there's not many teeth attached.if the hump is a cheap cut and is cooked accordingly it should be tasty,what part of the cow is this cut?

The 'hump' is the 'hump'......that hump that is characteristic of Brahma cows above the shoulders and I've always assumed that it was fatty, but the butcher at Makro says not and the piece that I bought is mostly lean with little tendon or fat.

Don......any suggestions for an 18 hr marinate?? and after the marinate, should I cook it like a roast beef?? fast and med rare or slow like a pot roast??

BTW......I've bought a few local tenderloins and they all were anything but tender.

Edited by jaideeguy
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maybe its a misprint should have read "lump" for 250bht a kilo i would cook it slow.

as for asking a butcher in makro,we asked him sunday do you have any ausi.beef steak?

the nod and yes showed the wf.nz.lamb.did by some nida beef mince for burgers,very,very tasty.

Normally the hump is tough. You might want to think about marinating it for 18 hours before roasting. From years in the beef business in Thailand the only part of the brahman beef cow that can be consumed with out mechanical or chemical tenderizing is the tenderloin or fillet. Exception to those who have strong jaw muscles.

no problem with the jaw muscles but there's not many teeth attached.if the hump is a cheap cut and is cooked accordingly it should be tasty,what part of the cow is this cut?

The 'hump' is the 'hump'......that hump that is characteristic of Brahma cows above the shoulders and I've always assumed that it was fatty, but the butcher at Makro says not and the piece that I bought is mostly lean with little tendon or fat.

Don......any suggestions for an 18 hr marinate?? and after the marinate, should I cook it like a roast beef?? fast and med rare or slow like a pot roast??

BTW......I've bought a few local tenderloins and they all were anything but tender.

Most Thai tenderloins are tough as the cows grow up on the road side. There is only one quality supplier and grower of beef in Thailand and that is Beef Pro. I did business with them for 16 years.

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Well, congratulations on making it to 80 Don and to being finally retired!! But sorry to hear that you closed down your restaurant before I had a chance to sample it.

I do have some Prague cure #1 [pink salt] that I use for my smoking bacon hoby....would that be a good addition to the marinate that you suggest?? Your suggested ingredients are about my taste for beef/pork and I always throw in lots of garlic. Thanks for that.

It's almost 2 kilos and I may cut it in half and do one slow and long and the other as a marinated roast as you suggested.

BTW, are you still doing the chipolte peppers up there?? and if you are interested in growing some 'hickory king' dent corn for real masa tortillas, I still have a few kilos of viable seed that I'll give you or anyone else, just to keep the strain pure and hope that maybe if you get a bumper crop, you'll share back.

enjoy your retirement and active sex life.....

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Recommend that you do not use the prague as it is a salt peter used for slow curring and long term use.

Chipotle is a smoked pepper. I am only doing the sauce now and shipping to Foodland Bangkok.

I live in a 5 Rai compound in the foot hills of Doi Hang 7 km from the city. I fell in love with Chiang Rai 25 years a go and looked forward to retiring here. Recommend that you spend 150 Baht and have me down load Merchant Of The Orient, An Entrepreneurs's Journey in Life. I think your credit is good for such a large amount. This book is a lot about Thailand and my life starting in 1940 on the farm.

Email: [email protected]

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I don't know if these are of any use but if I want a particular cut of meat I give a picture to my wife and she either knows the correct Thai words or shows the local butcher and if he doesn't have it he usually gets it from his supplier.

post-5614-0-10509800-1373437225_thumb.jp

post-5614-0-87826500-1373436958_thumb.jp

post-5614-0-50455200-1373437072_thumb.jp

post-5614-0-41098800-1373437088_thumb.jp

post-5614-0-71924800-1373437153_thumb.jp

post-5614-0-82769500-1373437161_thumb.jp

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Chipotle is a smoked pepper. I am only doing the sauce now and shipping to Foodland Bangkok.

Hi Don... Just as a a quick aside, LOVE your chipotle sauce... Buy it every week at Foodland here in BKK, along with some japapeno sauce as well. They're a staple on my morning omelettes over rice, as well as on lunch burritos, etc etc.

Just have two wishes: 1] that you keep growing your peppers and making your sauces for many years to come. 2] that you'd offer your sauces in larger sized bottles/sizes than the current 90 ml ones.

I go thru the chipotle sauce like drinking water. tongue.png

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