Jump to content
BANGKOK 20 June 2019 22:23
Sign in to follow this  
webfact

Nok Air's plane skids off runway in Trang Province

Recommended Posts

Easy to knock Nok after the event and with clear weather photographs but a commercial pilot will not abort a rolling take-off without good reason and knowing how steady heavy rain can become gusty torrential rain within moments.

I fully understand the pilot's actions, better to risk going off runway and possible under carriage damage than get slammed into the runway in a non-viable take off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why did the pilots determine weather before takeoff run?

They get a full weather briefing as part of the preflight procedures. Just prior to roll out the tower will give them final wind conditions. It's possible during the roll out that a major shift in wind conditions occurred exceeding their maximum cross wind component which requires an abort or if a microburst detected. Unlikely equipment to detect microburst is available there but it is standard procedure that other pilots who have just departed to call in such conditions if they experience them.

Very nice reply, full marks to the pilot, everybody is fine. Forget the Gung Ho attitude, for whatever reason the pilot adjudged the conditions were too dangerous and aborted, well done I say. If you were sitting in that seat with all those lives in your hands, this was the right decision. I would fly with that guy anywhere any time.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trying to turn off a runway halfway down at some speed trying to abort ???? As said why not carry on with your breaking on the main runway when you have 40% of it left.

IF the short tarmac to the terminal was used then I would have thought -maybe--bad judgement by the pilot --- -error.

If he had reached the end of the runway and still at some spead he would have to try to turn off. Suppose we will have to wait for the official report on the incident---Ha Ha but rarely there is a follow up, not forgetting this is Thai Airways company---Government control ????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Easy to knock Nok after the event and with clear weather photographs but a commercial pilot will not abort a rolling take-off without good reason and knowing how steady heavy rain can become gusty torrential rain within moments.

I fully understand the pilot's actions, better to risk going off runway and possible under carriage damage than get slammed into the runway in a non-viable take off.

At the end of the day that's it. It takes balls the size of Jupiter to abort a take off when you are sat in one of those machines going max chat down the runway. I am sure an investigation will reveal why very quickly, and also whether procedure was broken or not. If everyone on here can ignore the statement from the Trang Airport official (who has likely never had to give a press statement in 20 years) then there is not much to complain about. I just cannot imagine the pilot in the middle of a breaking abort trying to make that turn off into the terminal, if he did, he would be 'in' the terminal. A brake issue on one side could have caused him to veer off centerline during max breaking, or an issue involving aquaplaning (i have only had it once in 22 years and it required a change of underwear!). Any landing/full stop you walk away from is a success ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Easy to knock Nok after the event and with clear weather photographs but a commercial pilot will not abort a rolling take-off without good reason and knowing how steady heavy rain can become gusty torrential rain within moments.

I fully understand the pilot's actions, better to risk going off runway and possible under carriage damage than get slammed into the runway in a non-viable take off.

At the end of the day that's it. It takes balls the size of Jupiter to abort a take off when you are sat in one of those machines going max chat down the runway. I am sure an investigation will reveal why very quickly, and also whether procedure was broken or not. If everyone on here can ignore the statement from the Trang Airport official (who has likely never had to give a press statement in 20 years) then there is not much to complain about. I just cannot imagine the pilot in the middle of a breaking abort trying to make that turn off into the terminal, if he did, he would be 'in' the terminal. A brake issue on one side could have caused him to veer off centerline during max breaking, or an issue involving aquaplaning (i have only had it once in 22 years and it required a change of underwear!). Any landing/full stop you walk away from is a success wink.png

Which was my original reply. It was reported he changed runway which thought would be unwise.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RVR, runway visual range, upon line up with the runway, if you cant see a certain distance on the runway, you don't go, V1 means the speed at which if you initiate an abort you will have sufficient distance to stop. Either these guys tried to take off in below operational condition and lost visual alignment with the runway then tried to stop or figured they couldn't stop and put in it the grass. The last check before V1 is distance and speed, if you don't have 100 knots say at the 2000 meter marker then abort. Apply full brakes until stop and maintain directional control or the auto brakes should apply by themselves with the selection of engine thrust reverse and spoilers. So why did they not maintain directional control ??

It would be nice if someone could proved the METAR for that time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trying to turn off a runway halfway down at some speed trying to abort ???? As said why not carry on with your breaking on the main runway when you have 40% of it left.

IF the short tarmac to the terminal was used then I would have thought -maybe--bad judgement by the pilot --- -error.

If he had reached the end of the runway and still at some spead he would have to try to turn off. Suppose we will have to wait for the official report on the incident---Ha Ha but rarely there is a follow up, not forgetting this is Thai Airways company---Government control ????

I might be mistaken, but since this is a USA manufactured aircraft, both Boeing and the NTSB will be part of the accident investigation team.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was leaves, weeeeeeell in UK it's always leaves with trains. sad.png , sounds good to me, yep, leaves. thumbsup.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These guys need some new pilots... i have flown nok air a few times and each landing is always a bit rough, dunno if its the planes, but we landed way too fast once at chaing mai and it wasn't pretty :/

Reminds me of a story about an elderly lady's reaction after a very heavy landing. It used to be the particular airlines policy that the First Officer would stand at the front door with members of the cabin staff to say farewell and thank you for flying with us as passengers alighted. The ancient tapped the First Officer on the arm as she reached the door and asked, "Young man, did we land or did we crash?"

Many moons ago I was the Steward in charge on a UK domestic trip, Heathrow to Belfast (Nutts Corner). The ride was very bumpy as we descended and the constant changes in engine speed and uneven flight level indicated that the 'bus drivers' up front were having their work cut out. The landing was quite heavy, although I had experienced much worse, and I and members of the cabin staff team were on our feet and out in the cabin as soon as we felt reverse thrust applied. Everything appeared normal and routine as we felt the bumps as we encountered the joins on the concrete sections of the runway as the aircraft lost speed, but then the ride became quite rough. The airplane came to a halt too abruptly for my liking and then tilted over to starboard. I called 'Emergency Evacuation' and my associates opened all the doors and set off the emergency escape chutes. We had cleared about a hundred of the passengers when 'God' came out of the cockpit and said 'No need for evacuation". He then looked out of the door at a huddled bunch of passengers standing in pouring rain and up to their ankles in mud. Turning through 180 degrees and looking out the other door he saw a similar sight. I'll never forget his pained look and his muttered "Oh, <deleted>." At least he had the good grace to say afterwards that I had made the right decision.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be nice if someone could proved the METAR for that time.

Much better picture of what was going on here. Looks like differential braking due to heavy water on the runway, that is less traction on one side than the other.

Incidents > Nok Air B738 at Trang on Aug 6th 2013, runway excursion during rejected takeoff.

A Nok Air Boeing 737-800, registration HS-DBM performing flight DD-7411 from Trang to Bangkok Don Muang (Thailand) with 142 people, accelerated for takeoff from Trang's runway 08 at about 17:45L (10:45Z) in rain and strong winds when the crew rejected takeoff. During the slow down the aircraft veered to the right and came to a stop about half way down the runway with all gear on soft ground off the right hand edge of the runway. The passengers disembarked onto the runway via the left hand rear exit and mobile stairs. No injuries occurred, the aircraft received minor if any damage.

At the time of the incident a heavy rain shower and gusting winds were reported.

Metars (the airport did not release any Metars after 09:00Z):

VTST 060900Z 19006KT 9999 SCT020 SCT120 BKN300 28/24 Q1007 RWY08 INFO F

VTST 060800Z 18005KT 9999 SCT018 SCT025 BKN120 27/23 Q1007 RWY08 INFO E

VTST 060700Z 19004KT 9999 SCT020 BKN120 BKN300 26/23 Q1008 RERA RWY08 INFO D

VTST 060200Z 00000KT 6000 -RA SCT018 BKN120 OVC300 25/24 Q1010 RWY08 INFO C

VTST 060100Z 17004KT 6000 SCT018 BKN120 OVC300 24/24 Q1010 RERA RWY08 INFO B

Aeroinside

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why did the pilots determine weather before takeoff run?

Is risking ground looping by changing runway standard operating procedure for abandoned takeoff?

As an ex pilot visability is the determening factor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not a pilot...but dont the runways have to total 36 degrees (360). 26 plus 8 equals 34 degrees (340). The opposite direction of Runway 26 should be Runway 10. Maybe I am wrong. Please correct me if I am. Thanks. Like I said...I am not a pilot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not a pilot...but dont the runways have to total 36 degrees (360). 26 plus 8 equals 34 degrees (340). The opposite direction of Runway 26 should be Runway 10. Maybe I am wrong. Please correct me if I am. Thanks. Like I said...I am not a pilot.

260 - 80 = 180 degrees. runway 26 means 260 degrees, runway 08 means 80 degrees. Details below.

Runway Numbers

Runways are numbered according the magnetic compass direction they are oriented to. They consist of two numbers, one at each end of the runway, each being the reciprocal of the other on the magnetic compass (180° opposite from each other).

One number is formed by rounding the compass bearing of one end of the runway up or down to the nearest 10° and dropping the last digit; if this results in a single digit, add a zero to the left of it. The other number is the reciprocal of the first number (see the table of Reciprocal Runway Numbers below). For example, if a runway is aligned north-south, then it is 18/36, not 00/18. The lower number is always listed first.

Runways have two ends. Each end is considered a different runway, even though it is the same actual runway surface.

If the compass heading of a runway is 122° you would round it down to 120 and drop the last digit, leaving you with 12. Thus it is called Runway 12/30.

If the compass heading of a runway is 37°, you would round it up to 40 and drop the last digit, leaving you with 4. Since this is a single digit, you add a zero to the beginning, giving you 04. Thus it is called Runway 04/22. Both Ellington and Hobby airports have a 04/22 runway.

HoustonSpotters

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Tywais. You explanation was very in-depth. Here in Vegas the main landing/take off runway is 25L & 25R (westerly direction). I know the opposite direction is 09L & 09R. Had I given it some thought....I should have figured that one out. I majored in Hotel Admin where I should have majored in Aeronautical Eng.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...