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Jeremiahnewton

Hat Yai

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I've been to Hat Yai already and its a poor substitute for Phuket or Chang Mai etc. Its geared up for the Malays/Singaporeans, think of it as a smaller version of Bangers but slightly more unfriendly.

A point of clarification here. When you mention the word " Malays ", you are actually refering to a particular ethnic race.

Malaysia is a multi racial, multi cultural, and multi religious nation. They have Malays, Chinese, Indians, and other ethnic

races in East Malaysia. In general terms, they are called Malaysians.

By the way, the majority (90%) of Malaysians who frequently visit Hatyai are the Malaysian Chinese.

The Malays would normally visit Southern Thailand. As the Malays are muslims, they have close family ties with the muslim South.

That is to say, Pattani, Narathiwat and Yala. The Malaysian Chinese would visit Hatyai, Betong, and beyond.

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not gonna debate the southern thailand issue...... :o cos that would take atleast 2 pages to say what I wanna say about whats been going on

but to answer the question of whether its save....this is how I would put it:

it is generally safe....life on a daily basis is very normal...only unsafe things would be the usual road accidents, pickpockets and such

but yes as other members have said there have in the past been a number of bomb incidents related to the militant action spilling on from nearby provinces of pattani and yala...yet on the whole these are more exceptions.

when you are looking at the situation from the outside...things look very scary..bombs and shootings almost everyday in the 3 southern most provinces....but once you are there...esp living there...life goes on almost as normal everyday.

i hope you have a good experience if you do decide to go there.

cheers....

(from someone who grew up in one of the 3 southern provinces...and still go back for visits every now and then.......last time was in May though...might head there again either end Dec or early Jan :D

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I was planning to go to LOS and Hatyai in mid-November. Still am. I haven't heard of any terrorist activity since the bombings in mid-September and the coup, which seems to have quieted things. Is this correct?

Thank you

KB.

Why do you want to go to a dangerous area in Thailand?

I had planned to check out the south of Thailand after reading some interesting positive reports last year and particularly wanted to see Songkla. A less busy area always intrigues me. And, really, how could the potential for injury or death be any different from downtown Bangkok. Taxi? Bomb? What's the diff? :o

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I was planning to go to LOS and Hatyai in mid-November. Still am. I haven't heard of any terrorist activity since the bombings in mid-September and the coup, which seems to have quieted things. Is this correct?

Thank you

KB.

Why do you want to go to a dangerous area in Thailand?

I had planned to check out the south of Thailand after reading some interesting positive reports last year and particularly wanted to see Songkla. A less busy area always intrigues me. And, really, how could the potential for injury or death be any different from downtown Bangkok. Taxi? Bomb? What's the diff? :o

Its a good point. How many deaths have there been in Hat Yai in the past 10 years from terrorism?

I think its fair to say that Hat Yai is safer than London from a terrorist threat, so you can make your own choice.

You are much more likely to die from a motorbike accident according to the stats.

It really does depend on what you want from travelling. If you want to get away from the beaten tourist track of say Phuket, Bangkok and Samui then Hat Yai or Songkla was very interesting to me, and seemingly undiscovered from western tourists. (Or at least I only saw a handful in my month there - apart from in Leigh Garden in Hat Yai)

Edited by pompeysi

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How many deaths have there been in Hat Yai in the past 10 years from terrorism?

<deleted> has 10 years got to do with bombs killing and maiming in Hat Yai?

Just look back 6 months, that's what matters. :o

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How many deaths have there been in Hat Yai in the past 10 years from terrorism?

<deleted> has 10 years got to do with bombs killing and maiming in Hat Yai?

Just look back 6 months, that's what matters. :o

OK so 4 people have been killed from terrorism in the past 6 months in Hat Yai.

That probably puts it below food poisioning, walking to a temple, drinking, etc etc.

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I don't know if i can do this, but i just send the same post in the other topic dealing with Hat Yai.

I just want to let the people know that Hat Yai is a great city with nice people (Thais and western) and you can have a lot of fun there...

I live in Hat Yai since over a year. I enjoy this area as it is still quiet and not too much western crowded as Pathaya is. What i mean is that it is not the same style, and it is true that for western people you can visit Hat Yai in 1 day 1/2.

The interesting thing is to rent a car (Budget has very cheap prices there) and go around with someone who knows the places.

If you go to Satun, you'll find better waterfalls then the one indicated in Lonely planet overcrowded with locals. i used to make a BBQ with friends there, and you can even find kind of pools under the water fall like in the french west indies.

On the way to Pattani from Songkhla, there are untouched beaches.

You can go to Pathalung rent a bicycle to a 1 day trip in the rubber trees.

The Songkhla lake has some very nice sea food restaurants.

On the Ko Yoh island, you will find a very nice museum (i never new that not less than 70 year ago there used to be Black people... African...! living in Songkhla province... amazing... ok i am still the only french-egyptian there :o ).

You can make a boat trip on the lake to visit the fish farms.

You can go around to Satun and have a look to the shrimp farms (i work in this business).

50 km south of Songkhla you can book a sport fishing boat (the real one and not in wood) and go on Grouper, snapper, thuna or other kinds of fishes fishing (not the small fish sizes...)

There is so much you can do there, but you need a car as many things are between 30 min and 1h30 min drive. You can easily stay there 1 week. the only thing is to know someone who can take you arround.

Exept this, if you live in Hat Yai you can play football and even RUGBY...

For the amateurs there are 2 or 3 4x4 off road teams,

Fitness centers and swimmipools everywhere,

BBQ's on Samila beach,

Dinning at Swanns,

Cheap and very good Buffet at Novotel...

there is really a lot to do, I enjoy this place...

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amir, thanks for the info and nice words to remind people that despite the possibility /threat of violence, there are a few things that might draw people to the region. and let me remind you that it is not a war-torn zone :o sure theres incidents here and there, but that goes on also in bangkok. infact sometime i feel like its more dangerous going to pubs in bangkok or even huahin when you never know when the local teen or youngster getting drunk will suddenly get upset with you for either eyeing them, crossing their path or other such trivial things, and suddenly pull out a gun or knife or grab a chair or bottle and hit you on the head

talk about danger...sighhhhhh

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Bomb blasts in Hatyai. Four killed including one farang English teacher.

8 Malaysian visitors injured.

And now the Coup D'etat.

What will become of Hatyai?

The answer:

Hatyai will be a ghost town.

No more tourists from Malaysia and Singapore for a long long time.

Hatyai would loose millions and millions of Bahts in terms of tourism.

The tourism industries, hotels, shop keepers, hawkers, restaurants,

and the sex related business would all be badly effected.

A similar fate that befell Bali....... The economy ruined. :o

I've been to Bali before and after the bombing. I didn't see any examples of a 'ruined economy'...

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Quote:

I've been to Hat Yai already and its a poor substitute for Phuket or Chang Mai etc. Its geared up for the Malays/Singaporeans, think of it as a smaller version of Bangers but slightly more unfriendly.

A point of clarification here. When you mention the word " Malays ", you are actually refering to a particular ethnic race.

Malaysia is a multi racial, multi cultural, and multi religious nation. They have Malays, Chinese, Indians, and other ethnic

races in East Malaysia. In general terms, they are called Malaysians.

By the way, the majority (90%) of Malaysians who frequently visit Hatyai are the Malaysian Chinese.

The Malays would normally visit Southern Thailand. As the Malays are muslims, they have close family ties with the muslim South.

That is to say, Pattani, Narathiwat and Yala. The Malaysian Chinese would visit Hatyai, Betong, and beyond.

As Malays are muslims ..... what the hel_l you talking about?

Learn about the geographical differences before you start spouting off. I know many 'Malays' and 'Thais' who don't fit into any category - the ones you're talking about anyway.

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For your information, I am born in Malaysia and I am a Malaysian citizen.

I know what I am talking about.

Under the Malaysian Federal Constitution, the Malays are Muslims by law.

Apostasy is a serious offence and would not be tolerated here.

In Malaysia, once a muslim, forever a muslim. No way out.

However for the other races, they are free to practise their own faith.

For your information, Malaysia is a muslim country.

If there is a conflict of civil and Islamic jurisprudence, the Islamic

law would supersede the civil law. That is to say the civil law

has no right to decide on Islamic cases.

Please check your facts first before you post.

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Hi,

Just to let you know what is happening over here.

The world must know what is happening over here.

I attach some very hot news from here:

21/11: Fears of racial violence stalk Malaysian politics

Category: General Posted by: Raja Petra

(Reuters) - Malaysian politics has been seized by fears of racial and religious violence after some fiery speeches at a meeting of the nation's pro-Muslim ruling party.

Some delegates at last week's meeting shocked Malaysia's non-Muslims with a call to sever the heads of non-believers and veiled talk of using a knife on the party's political opponents.

"There were even exhortations to violence," the Sun newspaper said in a commentary on the meeting of the main ruling party, the United Malays National Organisation (UMNO).

Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi disowned such sentiments in his speech to the meeting, but political analysts described the rhetoric as extraordinary, even for a party known for its occasional outbursts of Malay or Muslim chauvinism.

"Despite earlier warnings against racial slants in their speeches, racist remarks were made and the Chinese seemed to be openly identified as the target of some delegates' anger," wrote the Sun's veteran political writer, Zainon Ahmad.

Malaysia's politically dominant ethnic Malays, who make up a slim majority of the population and are overwhelmingly Muslim, have a history of tension with the ethnic Chinese, who dominate business and are much wealthier than their Malay compatriots.

In May 1969, hundreds of people were killed in race riots that many people in political power today, including the premier, believe could happen again if tensions get out of control.

Four decades later, race relations are being tested by a feeling among Muslims that Islam worldwide is threatened, a fear among non-Muslims that Islamic fundamentalism is on the rise and by debate over the real wealth gap between Malays and Chinese.

There is also a growing feeling inside the multi-racial ruling coalition, which is dominated by UMNO, that a three-year-old push by the premier to allow more room for public debate on religious and racial affairs has gone too far.

"He's realised the Pandora's box is opened, and he's made statements to the effect that his tolerance should not be tested," Terence Chong, a political analyst at the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore, told Reuters.

"His government came into power with a desire to differentiate itself from the previous administration, but gradually realised it needed support from the grassroots and has taken the path of least resistance," Chong said.

CLOSING PANDORA'S BOX

The premier plans to meet editors of Malay and Chinese-language newspapers in the next few weeks to ask them to be careful with the debate, a source close to government said.

"I think what he's going to tell them is use your common sense -- don't do anything inflammatory."

The government has also said it might stop televising the annual UMNO assembly after this year's speeches were beamed live into the nation's living rooms for the first time.

But Abdullah could find it tough to rein in public debate, especially on the Internet, given the strength of feeling.

The opposition Democratic Action Party (DAP), whose supporters are mostly ethnic Chinese, said the UMNO meeting had been the worst in decades from the standpoint of nation-building.

"If a Malaysian Chinese or Indian politician had warned of riots, being prepared to shed blood or even going amok, the Internal Security Act would have been invoked," veteran DAP opposition leader Lim Kit Siang told a dinner on Friday night.

That same day, police in the northern state of Penang fired warning shots to break up a scuffle between ethnic Chinese protesters and municipal officials attempting to demolish a Taoist temple said to have been built without planning approval.

The protesters complained that police had not allowed them time to retrieve statues of gods and other precious religious items from the temple before demolition.

"I think there is always a danger in such situations," political analyst Chong said.

"All you need is a few troublemakers. All you need is a quick scuffle. And very quickly it goes down a slippery slope."

But civil rights activist Chandra Muzaffar said Malaysia's internal security forces were quick to snuff out disturbances.

"When the intelligence services get a whiff of these things, they act very quickly. Why else do you think we haven't had any major crises for several years?" he said.

But he said it was dangerous to close the lid too firmly on debate of religious and racial issues.

"I would rather that they vent their feelings at a meeting like this, because in the context of Malaysian political culture, if they're all bottled up, then one fine day it all erupts."

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Hi,

Just to let you know what is happening over here.

The world must know what is happening over here.

I attach some very hot news from here:

21/11: Fears of racial violence stalk Malaysian politics

Category: General Posted by: Raja Petra

(Reuters) - Malaysian politics has been seized by fears of racial and religious violence after some fiery speeches at a meeting of the nation's pro-Muslim ruling party.

(...)

"When the intelligence services get a whiff of these things, they act very quickly. Why else do you think we haven't had any major crises for several years?" he said.

But he said it was dangerous to close the lid too firmly on debate of religious and racial issues.

"I would rather that they vent their feelings at a meeting like this, because in the context of Malaysian political culture, if they're all bottled up, then one fine day it all erupts."

You cannot compare with Thailand and Hat Yai. The people in Hat Yai are NOT racist. Buddhist, Muslim and Catholics are living together. Sometimes there are bombs, but it is exactly like in the french island Corsica were they want to be independent and put bombs almost everywhere (Corsica is like a religion for them...), and it's a minority.

Don't compare Malaysian problems with Hat Yai's problems... Nothing to do with it...

Edited by Amir

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This is Thailand and Malaysia related.

It has to do with Thailand & Malaysia.

It involves the insurgency in Pattani, Yala and Narathiwat.

Hatyai is only about 2 to 3 hours drive to the Sothern States.

22/11: Malaysia denies restaurants fund Thai separatists

Category: General Posted by: Raja Petra

Malaysia has rejected a claim by Thailand that Thai restaurants here are funding a southern Thai separatist movement, a report said on Wednesday.

Deputy Security Minister <deleted> Ah Kiow described the allegation by Thailand's Prime Minister Surayud Chulanont as "baseless", the New Straits Times reported.

"It is very imaginative of him. It is absolutely baseless. These restaurants are owned by Malaysians and Thais," the newspaper quoted him as saying.

<deleted> was responding to an article in a Thai daily, The Nation, which cited Surayud as saying that "tom yam kung" restaurants in Malaysia were allegedly financing insurgency activities in the troubled south.

Another junior security minister, Johari Baharom, demanded Thailand show proof of the allegation.

"If this is true, we will investigate. But they must come to us with information first," he was quoted as saying.

Husam Musa, state public administration, finance and economic planning committee chairman in the northeastern Kelantan state that borders Thailand, rebuked the allegations.

"I think the stall operators, who are mainly Thai Muslims, would only be sending back money to their families, not for the purpose alleged by Surayud," he said.

Thai restaurants owners also criticised Surayud.

"We are working to earn an honest living, not wrecking the lives of others," one was quoted as saying.

Residents in Thailand's southernmost provinces are mostly ethnic Malay and Muslim, sharing more culturally with their neighbors across the border than with the rest of Buddhist Thailand.

Separatist unrest and other violence has marked the region since January 2004, killing more than 1,500 people.

Surayud's military-backed administration has announced plans for talks with two insurgent groups this month, and rebel leaders have reportedly said they would like to hold the talks in Malaysia. - AFP

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Interesting, it reminds me of a couple of years ago when Thailand accused Malaysia of allowing members of the seperatist group wanted for murder to cross back into Malaysia. Malaysia cried foul and demanded proof. If I recall, proof was offered and Malaysia quickly dropped the outcry. .

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