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BANGKOK 25 May 2019 13:13
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pastafarian

Foreigners may no longer require a teacher's license?

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With experience of 'full-time' language teaching here. You need to organise and present between three and six 16 week courses each 20 week semester, record attendance of 200 + students, design exams and assess their ability with sensibility. Then do it all again with three and six different subjects and 200 + different students in the next 20 week time frame.

Know how to use a computer, make sound reasoned decisions and display professional judgement and conduct.

My personal experience is that this is very similar to studying for a western degree. There is minimal managerial support. You will not be told you are off track just not offered a new contract when it comes up for renewal.

This is not a difficult job for an experienced graduate. Without this experience or other relevant experience, I don't know.

Edited by Phuket electrician

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Whatever it takes, we must drive standards up. I can't take any more of these spelling mistakes. sad.png

531920_458009927649804_1135928757_n.jpg

Gawd I had to edit to fix a spelling mistake, that'll teach me. rolleyes.gif

Edited by theblether

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I have a teachers license and it is meaningless other than a barrier to entry. There are three ways to accomplish this feat. 1) have a teaching license from another country... any country. 2) pass the standardized test, which from what i hear has many grammatical mistakes on it and at times multiple correct answers and at other times no real correct answer. 3) pass a course online or through a local University which teaches you very little (this is how i got mine) and is simply a scheme to extract some money out of foreign teachers.

IMHO teachers licenses should be done away with. they dont serve much purpose and prove nothing. the government should help schools recruit, hire, and evaluate teachers on their merit. i have several friends who do not have a license and are good teachers.... as in they help students learn. I also know quite a few that fall on the inverse of that equation.

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A friend of mine actually took the examination for the teacher's license and he said it was the most incoherent multiple choice test he ever came across. It was full with spelling and grammatical errors and didn't make any sense whatsoever.

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I was an engineer working in Thailand, I am now retired in Thailand. I have a degree blurb blurb blurb.

Many of these so called teachers with TL can't even spell. A change in the law will make things much much worse,

this is a fact. Trying to finish the crossword in the local bars newspaper is an education in itself after the "so-called teachers" have tried

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I was an engineer working in Thailand, I am now retired in Thailand. I have a degree blurb blurb blurb.

Many of these so called teachers with TL can't even spell. A change in the law will make things much much worse,

this is a fact. Trying to finish the crossword in the local bars newspaper is an education in itself after the "so-called teachers" have tried

There are some 'teachers' like that, especially in the tourist areas, that have very poor English skills which is actually my point. The law about requiring a teacher's license is actually new itself and because of it many very good teachers are actually leaving Thailand as they are unable to stay here legally. The ones that are still here probably have the required degree even if it was completed 20-30 yrs ago, that is the only thing that the TCT check, they don't do any employmment history checks, English ability test, teaching ability test, peer/student evaluation etc etc which is much more important than a few years spent at Uni drinking and shagging with the occasional day spent studying.

I recently met a chap from London in his late forties that had been plastering for the last 20+ years but moved to Thailand a few years ago, just listening to him speak was a task with many grammatical errors so I imagine his written English was worse. Yet he was 'teaching' in a village school and was able to do so because he was a NES with a degree, the fact he was sat on a barstool every night of the week doesn't matter. If you then compare him to a colleague of mine in his mid thirties, dropped out of Warwick University (one of the top universities in England) in his third year as he was offered a good job and then spent 10yrs working for a number of blue chip companies but now living here with a wife and kid. My colleague has been teaching here for 7yrs yet is considering leaving due to the uncertainty as to whether he can stay working/living here, there is something very wrong if the former is preferred to the latter!

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I've heard from someone quite senior in the Private Schools Association that the MoE has finally realized that the TCT teacher license requirements are a barrier to improving Thai students' language skills as they have made it too difficult for Thai schools to hire sufficient numbers of foreign teachers to teach English. 3 Education Acts need to be changed by parliament. This may take a while.

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First let me say that I believe the reason Thailand ranks so low in English skills is consistent with their other low standards for education: the ruling elite don't want the masses educated because uneducated people are much easier to manipulate and are more willing to work for low wages.

With regard to teaching licenses, be aware that different categories of schools have different requirements. Some large, influential government schools can get work permits for teachers with no university degree. Where I work, teachers are required to have a bachelor's degree and a TEFL (TESOL, CELTA, etc.) in order to qualify for a legitimate work permit. A teacher's license is not required.

I agree that academic credentials, while generally desirable, don't guarantee good teaching skills. I've had Ph.D.s who couldn't last the day and I know folks with no degree who are excellent teachers. But in Thailand, there are plenty of teachers who have no work permit but can easily find work. And plenty of schools who ignor the rules. Thais usually hate rules.

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I hope this never happens. I teach English (part time) in a local education center and of the several other English teachers here, the only one that actually CAN speak English ( I'm English BTW) is Canadian. I have stood in for many other teachers here and their students speaking and writing skills are way below what they should be. I struggle to understand them on many occasions, with even the simplest of phrases. Yet somehow they always seem to get good grades. Myself and the Canadian teacher have discussed this many times and are appalled by the quality of the English education here. Allowing just anyone to teach will only serve to make the situation worse.

P.S The spell checker here, has just tried to correct the word "Center" to "Centre". ( Mine is the correct English spelling). Case proven lol

if you're British English, Lucifer, then you're wrong.

Centre = a point in the middle, a location, a place (in British English)

Center = someone or something that makes cents (in British English)

In American English, center is used the same as the British centre and is most prevalent internationally in computer programming such as the HTML positioning command " align=center".

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Although it is good news for some of us who genuinely want to do something with our spare time, it could bring in English eeeeeeeeer, hmmmmm, well you know what I mean. IF, vetting is done by qualified farangs, of which there are many, good stuff.

it may actually be to allow Philippians to come to teach in 2015 which would be a lot cheaper than frangs teachers

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With all of the Thais teaching English even at the Uni level, but who can't speak English, an NES who could pass a Tefl would have to be better. Too many Thais are being taught vocabulary and grammar but not learning to speak because the teacher can't speak. This is a massive problem in Isaan where many schools have never had an NES.

I have a friend near Sisaket who is a native Thai teacher. Her education is in math and science. Because she learned English at uni especially while getting her master's, she has been designated as the English teacher. Her speaking ability is horrible and we can barely talk. What she can say has such a terrible Thai accent that no child is really going to learn to use the language. Yet they dutifully have English classes with all communication in Thai. It's a joke.

There are millions of native English speaking retirees who would love to interact at the local school, but the retirement visa forbids working. In fact, the English translation is so strict that a foreigner can't even take out the garbage.

Thailand needs to wake up to the needs of the people to work and learn on an international level. Friends in the US love Thai, Indian and Chinese movies, but Thai movies with subtitles are difficult to find. Somehow, producers must learn that for every penny earned in Thailand, there are potentially 600 pennies to be made internationally.

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I believe it's all the old news as published by previous minister of education Suchart Thada-Thamrongvech on 29 June 2012. The forum rules forbid to post an excerpt or the link to that article but the essence of it all is that degree holders in for example physics will be allowed to teach physics in basic education schools without holding a degree in education or equivalent as described by law. The Teachers' Council of Thailand will provide for such degree holders a teacher license exemption letter. The teacher license exemption letter applies to teaching one or more specific subjects related to the applicant's university degree of study. AFAIK, the proposed amendment applies to both Thai and foreign teachers.

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Thanks for the input, Aidenai, you are immensely helpful.

I can understand how this would work with Physics, Chemistry, Upper level Mathematics, but how would it work with English teachers?

Would a Physics teacher, for example, be limited to only teaching Physics -- not that the schools would necessarily pay any attention to the regulations, but just curious?

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All of the so called English teachers I have met have no recognized qualifications and cannot speak Thai which I believe is essential if you want to teach a Thai person English

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