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Unseen Chiang Rai


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Sorry, I just want to add a picture from the side with the Thai registration number.

Most Beechcrafts Super 18 of this type have two wheels in front and a tail wheel.

This one has a nose wheel that is taken 'in' towards the front.

Somebody, please...

Limbo :)

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That the Beechcraft Trigear super 18 was known in Sweden might become clear of the following advertissement.

"Daddy, please come home for lunch"

The "Waesteraos" plane, though used by the same CIA Continental, was probably not the same as the one here in Chiang Rai.

It was originally bought from JAL, which used it for pilot training. Sorry !!!!!

Both planes were bought by Bo at the same time each for the price of 300.000 Svenska Kronor.

Limbo :)

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Edited by Limbo
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  • 1 month later...
Captain Thorvaldsen, he was a policeman and his relative was the famous Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen. Not sure where the portrait is though.

.

A little help: He was one of the very first foreigners that played an important role

in Chiang Rai. His main task might have been to prevent Chiang Rai from becoming

a state under the influence of the Shan king by preserving its status as vassal state

of the Great King Rama V.

One of his close family members is by many considered to be one of the greatest sculptors

through history of Danmark and has a museum in Kopenhagen named after him.

Limbo :)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . post-6305-1262576297_thumb.jpg

Captain Thorwaldsen wasn't the only Dane policing here in the north at the beginning of last century.

Chiang Mai had Captain Jensen and Captain Trolle in charge of public order.

After defending Lampang succesfully together with his second in command Louis Leonowens (yes, Anna's son)

and his fellow Dane Halfdan Trolle, Markward Jensen chased a group of Shan back to the north but didn't come

further than Payao where three bullets effectively terminated his earthly sejour.

His body is buried in the Chiang Mai Foreign Cemetery, but just a couple of kilometers south of Payao

on the verge of the 'superhighway' (coming from the north at your left) a little monument is erected to

memorize his bravery. Does any body have a picture of this little monument?

Limbo :D

PS: A pic of his obelisk in Chiang Mai.

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  • 2 months later...

It is indeed a nice little memorial monument.

Surprised to see that the young Danish adventurer who chose a career as mercenary

in the service of the Great King Rama V was only 24 when he was halted and sent to

the eternal hunting fields.

Limbo :)

post-6305-1274857186_thumb.jpgpost-6305-1274857229_thumb.jpg

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It is indeed a nice little memorial monument.

Surprised to see that the young Danish adventurer who chose a career as mercenary

in the service of the Great King Rama V was only 24 when he was halted and sent to

the eternal hunting fields.

Limbo :)

post-6305-1274857186_thumb.jpgpost-6305-1274857229_thumb.jpg

Yes indeed the story is fascinating. I put some info about this on GT Rider here Captain Hans Jensen.

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Yes indeed the story is fascinating. I put some info about this on GT Rider here Captain Hans Jensen.

Thanks David, a great link to an excellent forum for those who like to travel by motorbike and want to 'see'

something at the same time as well.

Here in Chiang Rai Canadian Dr. Briggs seems to have played a very important, if not decisive role, during the rise

of the Shan. The same Dr. Briggs that built the town hall, the prison, the hospital, the First Church, the first 'CWK'

school and the Overbrook Hospital. Oh yes, don't let us forget that he also developed the Chiang Rai street pattern.

He represented the Great King Rama V in the area north of Payao and has certainly been instrumental in incorporating

this northern vassal sate in the Siamese nation, as would happen not long after with the Kingdom of Nan when its last

king died. The role of Captain Thorwaldsen (later Lt.Col.) is not clair. He was 25 in 1900, about the same age as Jensen.

After having fenced of the Shan invaders, the local Shan were seen as unreliable and had to move out of town.

They were allowed to relocate themselves far away from the city, yes, as far as Pa Korn, which now is considered to

be close to the center (Pa Korn Market at the Pahonyothin not far from the Sperm Pub, where the new big plaza is being built).

The little wooden temple with 'Burmese' style decorations is still there, hidden in the middle of the old Shan village.

The monks wear brown-red robes.

See also the thread:

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/farangs-Chia...p;hl=foreigners

Another site presents such a massive reflection on Lanna history that one automatically expects Joel Barlow to be its author:

http://chiangrailanna.com/Eng%20Web/From_D...n_Times_Eng.htm

Limbo :)

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Quote: "Oh yes, don't let us forget that he also developed the Chiang Rai street pattern."

Limbo must be speaking about the few blocks surrounding the clock tower. Other than that, the only noticeable "pattern" to the streets is the lack of any pattern. I get so tickled at myself sometimes when I follow a street and, all too soon, end up right back where I started.

But hey, maybe it was done intentionally to throw off invading forces. I can see how a patrol column could set out in search of the enemy and soon come upon the rear guard of another column. Quite the battle could ensue before the forces realized that the rear of the patrol was being attacked by the front of the same patrol. It is all about attrition, isn't it?

Edited by kandahar
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  • 1 year later...

So where can you find this place?

post-29230-0-17514500-1322057721_thumb.j

Here are some novices in evening pray.

post-29230-0-75526000-1322057713_thumb.j

And this is the fantastic view from this place!

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Have you been there ?

:D:);)

Could it be the Crow Temple in Thoedt Thai (Hin Taek)?

Really superb pictures! Your development as a photographer

since the 'Chiangrai through Foreign Eyes' exhibition

is amazing. Time for a sequel?

When you are ready for it, give me a call.

There are more thaivisa members (present and former) that

have shown interest.

Limbo :yohan:

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  • 2 weeks later...
It is indeed a nice little memorial monument.

Surprised to see that the young Danish adventurer who chose a career as mercenary

in the service of the Great King Rama V was only 24 when he was halted and sent to

the eternal hunting fields.

Limbo :)

post-6305-1274857186_thumb.jpgpost-6305-1274857229_thumb.jpg

Yes indeed the story is fascinating. I put some info about this on GT Rider here Captain Hans Jensen.

I was lokking at your link to this-and it looks like they have moved the storie.

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It is indeed a nice little memorial monument.

Surprised to see that the young Danish adventurer who chose a career as mercenary

in the service of the Great King Rama V was only 24 when he was halted and sent to

the eternal hunting fields.

Limbo :)

post-6305-1274857186_thumb.jpgpost-6305-1274857229_thumb.jpg

Yes indeed the story is fascinating. I put some info about this on GT Rider here Captain Hans Jensen.

I was lokking at your link to this-and it looks like they have moved the storie.

Found this one:

http://www.thailandshistoria.se/artiklar/17/11/bangkok-brrama-i-rama-vii/kung-chulalongkorn/upproren-omkring-1900-talets-borjan

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It is indeed a nice little memorial monument.

Surprised to see that the young Danish adventurer who chose a career as mercenary

in the service of the Great King Rama V was only 24 when he was halted and sent to

the eternal hunting fields.

Limbo :)

post-6305-1274857186_thumb.jpgpost-6305-1274857229_thumb.jpg

Yes indeed the story is fascinating. I put some info about this on GT Rider here Captain Hans Jensen.

I was lokking at your link to this-and it looks like they have moved the storie.

Found this one:

http://www.thailandshistoria.se/artiklar/17/11/bangkok-brrama-i-rama-vii/kung-chulalongkorn/upproren-omkring-1900-talets-borjan

Tack ska du ha Brianmarinus!

Did you visit the grave of our own Danish hero already,

Captain Thowaldsen?

It's at the old part (the right side halfway up) of the

old Christian Churchyard five hundred meters north of

Den Ha (the old Chiang Mai road, Thanon Dong Ma Da),

not so far from where you live.

Indeed a very good site about Thailand and its history!

In Swedish though ...

The good thing is that, as far as I know, there are at

least ten foreigners living in Chiang Rai that won't have

the slightest problem reading it.

Surprising that the Dane Jensen probably was under the command

of the higher ranked Louis Leonowens at Payao, the son of Anna

Leonowens, the famous British teacher at the court of the great

King Rama V, where she teached the princes and princesses.

Limbo :yohan:

I'm not sure if I showed this picture already of the little

monument not far from the place where Jensen alegedly was shot

(situated conveniently directly at the super highway not far

from Payao). The place is regularly visited and well maintained.

People clearly still make merit there as there are always fresh

flowers and other objects pointing in that direction.

I think the local police community preserves his memory.

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As long as nobody comes up with a bigger one this will remain the biggest.

It's in a great area for walking or mountainbiking, about 10 kms out of town.

Limbo :yohan:

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I think I been there with a couple of friends on a bikeride. If it is the same tree and place, you go up towards the Hot Springs on the southern side of Kok river, after passing Dons maybe 3 km there is a road to a village on your left side. Follow that one and the the figtree is just beside the road on your left.

:unsure::ermm::o

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So where can you find this place?

post-29230-0-17514500-1322057721_thumb.j

Here are some novices in evening pray.

post-29230-0-75526000-1322057713_thumb.j

And this is the fantastic view from this place!

post-29230-0-88736800-1322057705_thumb.j

Have you been there ?

:D:);)

It is the stupa Pathat Come Sithop on the top of the mountain in BanRong Bua Thong on highway 1173 going towards Waterford Valley.

Fantastic view from there.

And you can see the Happy City golf course in the sunset view.

:ph34r:;):)

(Yes! If you check post nbr 30 you find a photo of this place and in post nbr 33 you find the answere where it is. )

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As long as nobody comes up with a bigger one this will remain the biggest.

It's in a great area for walking or mountainbiking, about 10 kms out of town.

Limbo :yohan:

post-6305-0-87975700-1323390564_thumb.jp

I think I been there with a couple of friends on a bikeride. If it is the same tree and place, you go up towards the Hot Springs on the southern side of Kok river, after passing Dons maybe 3 km there is a road to a village on your left side. Follow that one and the the figtree is just beside the road on your left.

:unsure::ermm::o

I think this one is nearly as big as yours-but thats in Uthai Thani.

https://picasaweb.google.com/113661392164579317041/1012201102?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCLmy3_G3yJCy-AE&feat=directlink

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As long as nobody comes up with a bigger one this will remain the biggest.

It's in a great area for walking or mountainbiking, about 10 kms out of town.

Limbo :yohan:

post-6305-0-87975700-1323390564_thumb.jp

I think I been there with a couple of friends on a bikeride. If it is the same tree and place, you go up towards the Hot Springs on the southern side of Kok river, after passing Dons maybe 3 km there is a road to a village on your left side. Follow that one and the the figtree is just beside the road on your left.

:unsure::ermm::o

Right you are!

Erg and I intended to walk a big loop through the tea plantations, but we should

have had a look at a map first... We didn't go further than the big Buddha image

on the hilltop.

People like Flupke probably would enjoy to do it on their bicycles but I think that

ordinary mortals better could opt for a motorbike to explore this area.

The road is part of a stage of the International Mountainbike Challenge of Chiang Rai

that has been held for twelve years now. Great event, mostly in January/February.

A good place to finish could for instance be the Prasoet hotspring. They have nice

barbeque chicken and even Heineken, not to mention the hot water pool.

Here are some other pictures of the road.

Limbo :yohan:

PS Brianmarinus: The tree you found is much bigger. Good picture, keep them coming!

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Before the link sinks into oblivion I would like to mention it again.

And I want to say thanks to Brianmarinus again for sharing it with us.

Unbelievable how detailed the author describes the decisive struggle in northern

Thailand between the mainly Shan separatists and the representatives of the central

powers in the Siamese capital and on top of that the remarcable role played in it

by foreigners like Hans Markvard Jensen and Louis Leonowens.

Mats Borner, the author, has really done great work. The way he presents

Thai history to us is not only very pleasant to read but of great historical

correctness as well. He leans on existing litterature but by adding earlier

unknown details he raises our understandig of the past of the country where we

now live to a new level.

For the Swedes among us especially the chapter about the visit of the great King

Chulalongkorn to Sweden must be very interesting (and entertaining) to read.

I think the Chulalongkorn Pavillion in Utanede has been mentioned before in this

forum. Mats Borner comes with new details about its construction.

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Mats Borner is a scholar of the calibre of Dutch Han ten Brummelhuis. Both

men got fascinated by Thailand, studied the Thai language at European universities

and in Bangkok and spent a lot of time on research and its reporting.

After the recent floods it might be appropriate to mention Han's thesis about the

Dutch engineer that, also as a direct result of the Great King's travel to Europe,

came to Thailand to dreg the 'klongs' and to install the sluices along the Chao

Pya River (also in these days the Dutch government has contracted a Dutch hydrotechnical

engineer for three weeks and offered his services to the Thai Government. Furthermore

a 'memo of understanding' is on track for the development of a new masterplan).

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Limbo :yohan:

I would strongly recommend 'Merchant, courthier and diplomat, a history of the

contacts between the Netherlands and Thailand' of Han ten Brummelhuis as well.

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Before the link sinks into oblivion I would like to mention it again.

Rather surprised to find another foreigner on Mats' website that was awarded a Thai noble title:

Phraya Chonlayutthayothin. He was from Denmark. It was Andreas du Plessis de Richelieu, a naval

officer and businessman who became admiral of the Siamese navy.

He was in charge at the time of the Paknam incident in 1893, when French ships went into a battle

with the Siamese navy on the Mae Nam Chao Phya. He suggested that the steamer Maha Chakri (already

under command of Dutch Captain Banning?) would ram the French ship but King Chulalongkorn didn't give

permission to do so. The Maha Chakri was the ship that the Great King would use for his travels to

Europe in 1897 and 1907.

The Greek Constantine Phaulcon and Belgian Gustave Rolin Jaquemijns had higher titles, namely Chao Phya.

Of the latter recently a sculpture was unvealed in Mae Chan.

Limbo :yohan:

post-6305-0-15543700-1323831591_thumb.jp

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Before the link sinks into oblivion I would like to mention it again.

Rather surprised to find another foreigner on Mats' website that was awarded a Thai noble title:

Phraya Chonlayutthayothin. He was from Denmark. It was Andreas du Plessis de Richelieu, a naval

officer and businessman who became admiral of the Siamese navy.

He was in charge at the time of the Paknam incident in 1893, when French ships went into a battle

with the Siamese navy on the Mae Nam Chao Phya. He suggested that the steamer Maha Chakri (already

under command of Dutch Captain Banning?) would ram the French ship but King Chulalongkorn didn't give

permission to do so. The Maha Chakri was the ship that the Great King would use for his travels to

Europe in 1897 and 1907.

The Greek Constantine Phaulcon and Belgian Gustave Rolin Jaquemijns had higher titles, namely Chao Phya.

Of the latter recently a sculpture was unvealed in Mae Chan.

Limbo :yohan:

post-6305-0-15543700-1323831591_thumb.jp

He was the first and only foreigner, who became Admiral and minister of the Royal thai navy-beginnig d.16.01.1900.-29.01.1901.

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  • 2 weeks later...

In Europe weconsider it absolutely normal to see many centuries old buildings,

private houses, churches, government buildings, palaces, bridges or whatever.

People don't even realize the uniqueness of these monuments as they simply are

part of their 'natural' environment. Many don't even notice them anymore.

In Greece you walk through ruins of towns from for instance the Minoan epoque,

more than five thousand years old, better preserved and in much better shape

than the only about seven hundred years old 'poor' ruins in Chiang Saen.

In the smallest village on Crete you unexpectly can be standing next to a well that

was dug five thousand years ago and where uncountable generations all these f

ive thousand years got their water from.

I call the ruins of Chiang Saen 'poor' because they have been stripped from all s

culptures, stonecarvings etc. On top of that many ruins seem to be reconstructions

rather than excavated and preserved genuine remnants of buildings.

Chiang Saen was deliberately depopulated and destroyed in former times and

treasure hunters took care of the forgotten details.

Next year Chiang Rai celebrates it's 750 years anniversary.

I hope that the celebrations will contribute to a greater awareness about the

importance of preserving testimonies from the past (and present, for future

generations) and that they may contribute to the long awaited realization of

the museum plans for the Mae Kok River island.

Sadly enough Chiang Rai has very few historical buildings.

The big city fire in the fifties destroyed more than half of town as almost

all houses were made of wood. The few old wooden houses left mark the

extension of that fire.

The urge build new and in stone instead of restoring wooden buildings took a toll

as well. Several temples were sacrificed along the way. The sentiment that restoring

an old temple gives less value in sense of 'tam boon' than building a new one

contributed probably also.

A building of hundred years is therefore considered old in Chiang Rai!

This doesn't mean that these younger buildings would not be of historical

importance, certainly not!

A nice example of such a young monument is the one on the pictures.

It tells an interesting story as well.

Limbo neus.gif

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