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32,000 Thai six graders are illiterate: Education official

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About half of the grade 3 students don't learn until grade 6. They just need another 3 years and all should be literate.

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I agree but complex, complicated and sophisticated aren't they the same thing as misconstruing?cheesy.gif

Not at all!!

Sophisticated means cultured or well mannered (refined) - I would hardly call (not) planting your elbows on the dinner table whilst eating as a complicated or complex action!! Maybe you wouldn't know that as I'm guessing that you are not a sophisticatewai2.gif.

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About half of the grade 3 students don't learn until grade 6. They just need another 3 years and all should be literate.

We start teaching the children in our private kindergarten school the Thai language when they are 3 years old and English when they are 4!!

Twice in 4 years (including last year) we have had the number 1 English pupil in Nakhonsithammarat province and this year the number 1 English pupil in tests for the English program in the local (largest government school in the area).

Once they know children have graduated from our school they can bypass entry tests into this school on account of their previous schooling!!

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according to your twisted logic - climbing a small hill is easier than climbing a tall mountain!!

I simply do not know how you come to your conclusion that a language with just 21 consonants, 5 vowels,no special witing rules, no tone rules, whereby the vowels are fitted into the word only, 1 class of consonant, all of the letters are very simple characters, having gaps between the words etc: can be simpler than a language that has 44 consonants, 32 vowels, many special writing rules, 5 tones for pronunciation dependant on the tone marks, consonant class, whether they have live or dead endings plus short or long vowels, vowels appear all around the letters, 3 classes of consonant (low high and mid), no gaps between the words in a sentence etc:

Clearly you believe that the initial teaching alphabet (i.t.a.) was thoroughly ill-conceived! My parents, who had to teach using it, found that though it got children reading and writing quicker, it's big drawback was the time taken to progress to Traditional Orthography (T.O.).

English has more than just 21 consonants and 5 vowels. It has many digraphs, a few trigraphs and the occasional tetragraphs. Counting the (irregular) length rules as discontinuous digraphs, we have in your first paragraph:

a (context rule: class)

age (language)

al (all)

c (context rule: sentence)

ch (characters)

ci (special)

ea (dead)

ea (appear)

ee (between)

el (vowels)

er (simpler)

ere (where)

gu (language)

i_e (writing, live)

igh (high)

o_e (do, to, tones)

o_e (consonant, only)

om (come)

ou (around)

wor (word)

ow (know, low)

ow (how, vowels)

ou (your - and probably a trigraph <our> for British English)

si (conclusion)

th (with, the, than, whether)

u_e (conclusion, rules)

wh (where, whether)

y_e (whereby)

wh (whereby)

I've ignored the silent letters, as Thai has implicitly silent letters as well. I've also ignored vowel slurring, and a few other issues.

You chose the wrong 4 by the way as I much prefer tor tong, tor toong, tor pootow and tor taharn!!

And you can add tho than and tho montho.

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according to your twisted logic - climbing a small hill is easier than climbing a tall mountain!!

I simply do not know how you come to your conclusion that a language with just 21 consonants, 5 vowels,no special witing rules, no tone rules, whereby the vowels are fitted into the word only, 1 class of consonant, all of the letters are very simple characters, having gaps between the words etc: can be simpler than a language that has 44 consonants, 32 vowels, many special writing rules, 5 tones for pronunciation dependant on the tone marks, consonant class, whether they have live or dead endings plus short or long vowels, vowels appear all around the letters, 3 classes of consonant (low high and mid), no gaps between the words in a sentence etc:

Clearly you believe that the initial teaching alphabet (i.t.a.) was thoroughly ill-conceived! My parents, who had to teach using it, found that though it got children reading and writing quicker, it's big drawback was the time taken to progress to Traditional Orthography (T.O.).

English has more than just 21 consonants and 5 vowels. It has many digraphs, a few trigraphs and the occasional tetragraphs. Counting the (irregular) length rules as discontinuous digraphs, we have in your first paragraph:

a (context rule: class)

age (language)

al (all)

c (context rule: sentence)

ch (characters)

ci (special)

ea (dead)

ea (appear)

ee (between)

el (vowels)

er (simpler)

ere (where)

gu (language)

i_e (writing, live)

igh (high)

o_e (do, to, tones)

o_e (consonant, only)

om (come)

ou (around)

wor (word)

ow (know, low)

ow (how, vowels)

ou (your - and probably a trigraph <our> for British English)

si (conclusion)

th (with, the, than, whether)

u_e (conclusion, rules)

wh (where, whether)

y_e (whereby)

wh (whereby)

I've ignored the silent letters, as Thai has implicitly silent letters as well. I've also ignored vowel slurring, and a few other issues.

You chose the wrong 4 by the way as I much prefer tor tong, tor toong, tor pootow and tor taharn!!

And you can add tho than and tho montho.

Wow I'm impressed!!

However, what I am talking about is normal reading though (to the point of understanding text) and not to degree, or PhD standard!!

Then there is the simplicity of the 26 characters (26 only note).

Yes, I forgot the foundation and giant's wife - just proves that this is a better choice as I have 6 against his 4!!

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