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first experince of gf isaan village


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That shouldn't be a problem as its the 2nd most common language in England. 5555

For gods sake don't tell 7by7. w00t.gif

I heard, like Dr Naam's dog he is trilingual.

Speaks fluent, Somali, Arabic and Punjabi, also putting in extra hours to learn Romanian for our gypo friends immenent arrival.

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If I was a youngster, (30's) I could never deal with village life. Of course we are all different so nobody can say ''your daft'' cos none of us are the same.

PS. I got daft as I got older. crazy.gif.pagespeed.ce.dzDUUqYcHZ.gif But still not daft enough for the village thing. facepalm.gif

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living in pattaya now im bored silly of the bars, only go now once a week to play pool. bar girl chat is more boring than village gossip

unless its about me.

I do play football twice a week that I will miss, but planning on a few rounds of golf when up north.

Also as not far from khon kaen can have a good p*ss up with friends when I feel like it.

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living in pattaya ...

When do you plan to pack our bags and settle down back in the village up in nong song hong 100km south of khon kaen with the support of her parents and family ?

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living  in pattaya  ...

 

When do you plan to pack our bags and settle down back in the village up in nong song hong 100km south of khon kaen with the support of her parents and family ?

 

What have you got to do to get an answer in this thread David?? Hang on, let me ask him for you:

Hey OP, when are you planning to move to the village and settle down there?

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If you speak and write good English which obviously you do. Why not teach your child yourself? Easy.

Sent from my GT-I9300T using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

Wow, that is so easy! You've just solved all of the problems for raising a child in Thailand and Isaan so that they are now safe, healthy and well educated and have the values and morals that I want from them. Congratulations on your amazing insight that nobody has ever considered before. You have just changed my life with that incredible comment.

Why so negative Matt? I home school my kids and we move effortlessly between lives in Australia and Thailand and they are doing great. It is actually a very valid option.

Edited by MeMock
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To the OP, good luck on the move to the village. We did it a while ago and I think you have been getting great insights from others. I agree with those who say that you will never be fully accepted as a member of the village, I am more of the village mascot or something. Everyone seems to be happy I am here as a novelty item in the village but I don't have any real friends among the Thai's in the village. To be honest I don't even try to develop friends here because every time I take the time to chat with someone with my broken Thai the conversation always turns to money or land or other things I don't really want to talk about. For me this is not a big deal as I was always a bit of a loner, I have the internet, sat TV and other interests to keep me busy. I am not completely anti-social but the weekly trip into town to meet up with other "Farang" for a beer or two is enough for me.

I think Matt's first post was excellent but since his posts seem to be getting more and more judgmental. While I think he has a valid point about his kids education I don't think it needs to be the only deciding factor in the decision. Having the time to be with your kids allows you to have more impact on their life. Yes they will be influenced by the other kids and the extended family but if you are directly involved in their life you can counter the negative and enhance the positive aspects of that. I sure don't claim to be an expert on anything but I agree strongly with MeMock and the other poster who home-school and/or supplement their kids education with tutoring. If I was still working in the west I would be getting home only an hour or two before his bedtime and likely wouldn't have the energy after a long days work to do much more than veg and watch TV with him.

I really like Sly's post as well, there are path's to success here if you look for them and work for it. Teaching is a good option for many to keep busy and keep the brain lubricated. Might be a good option for the OP as well once you are settled.

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I think Matt's first post was excellent but since his posts seem to be getting more and more judgmental. While I think he has a valid point about his kids education I don't think it needs to be the only deciding factor in the decision. Having the time to be with your kids allows you to have more impact on their life. Yes they will be influenced by the other kids and the extended family but if you are directly involved in their life you can counter the negative and enhance the positive aspects of that. I sure don't claim to be an expert on anything but I agree strongly with MeMock and the other poster who home-school and/or supplement their kids education with tutoring. If I was still working in the west I would be getting home only an hour or two before his bedtime and likely wouldn't have the energy after a long days work to do much more than veg and watch TV with him.

I haven't tried to be judgemental at all. Even when someone said that the primary reason they are raising their children in the poorest part of a 3rd world country with the worst education standards in this region was to save money and play golf, I wished them well and said it was their choice, no judgement from me about that. Any curt replies from me after that are simply because some people are trying to find something about me or my family to condescend me with.

I don't think I am being negative, I do have some positive points about living here but realistically the many cons outweigh the few pros here for me for raising my kids in Thailand, and especially in Isaan. In the beginning I did want it to work here and had some deluded thoughts about how I could make it work but looking back at it I was really just trying to gloss over certain things and convince myself I could make it work rather than impartially judging what the best option would be for my children. I see other posters in this thread are doing the same thing.

The visa situation is a big factor for me personally. I would be living year to year hoping that they don't introduce a rule that would mean we would all have to up and leave Thailand anyway. I don't like being at the mercy of that system. That's not me being negative, that is me thinking practically about what is likely to happen in the future.

That's without the consideration of how my kids will turn out if they grow up here and, to be blunt, I don't like Thai youth's culture, values or morals so that is a big factor for me to raise them in my home country which I know from growing up there. And yes, people will retort that there are Muslim children in the UK, and Eastern Europeans, and chavs and the dole but I honestly don't care, that's just the negative Daily Mail side of the UK that people focus on when they are not there and want something to criticise the UK about.

And as for schooling, everyone keeps saying that you have to home school your kids to make up for the lacking Thai education system, but even when we live in the UK I plan to be very involved with them and their studies anyway so I hope they will soar in the UK instead of just getting by in Thailand.

Like I said before, I have the option to either raise them in Thailand or the UK and economics are not a factor for me about this. But answer me this; how many Thais would choose the UK option if they had the same choice? Every westernised Thai person I have spoken to has told me that no way in hell should I send my kids to a Thai school, not even the best international school. This is why every rich Thai sends their kids to a western school.

So back to the OP, you have a few years left to make up your mind. If you can afford to drop a few million in Isaan for 3 years of living there and walk away from it all the same then go for it, otherwise you should hang on to your money and invest it wherever you decide to settle long-term. That's advice from my experience of living here for 3 years, maybe you think you have the answer already but you know what they say? "Experience is something you think you have until you get a little bit more of it". Don't rush into anything and don't commit to anything, it will be very difficult to tell your Isaan family your plans now and then change them completely later without breaking someone's face.

I may sound negative because it doesn't go along with everyone's "can do" attitude of trying to raise kids here because they want to stay here for themselves, but I am just trying to be realistic and the reality is my kids would be much better off growing up in the UK or so I believe. That's my prerogative and I don't care what anyone else does with their own kids. smile.png

So, there's the ammo, take your shots everyone. wai.gif

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