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first experince of gf isaan village


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I think if I told you 4 years ago not to move I would have been talking to a brick wall also.

I do not feel that I will be isolated as I said i have a group of young friends mid 20s same interests living an hours drive away, if and when I feel the need to socialize ill pop in the car. that's when the in-laws come in handy to babysit. its not like we are tied to the village if me want a holiday in Thailand no problem for a few weeks.

as well as being in the uk for a few months each year.

I do not plan to spend £65k no need to spend 1million on a car. and a modest clean house will do.

I to feel I am being sensible the house is for the family now and my child long term even if he/she wants to live or sell the land in the future after we are in the ground.

I have read all the comments and taken on board the many helpful posts, but a few my way or the highway post are not helpful to me as I was always moving to the village just wanted to here readers experiences.

I have to agree with Mat on this. Although some can make the change and live in a village most cannot. I am one of those who cannot. We have a house in the village which we visit for a few months every year and that is enough for us all. There are a few farangs aorund and about our area with fairly regular "meetings" in various places but all require a few miles on the bike or in car and with the beer, rural roads etc etc not too good an idea.

By the way I know Nong Song Hong a bit and it is defintely not a village, such as most posters here are referring to, but also a fair flog up to KKC or down to Korat to see friends.

There are quite a few westerners in Ban Phai who meet up twice a week but definitely not in your age group coffee1.gif

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I move in jan, but have now decided to build next November when the baby will be 8 months, don't want any stress during the birth.

will also give me more time living with the family see how we get on.

I think this is a brilliant approach. the time between Jan. and Nov. will give you lots of time to decide if the village life is for you. Don't feel like it is some sort of a failure if down the road you decide to change your mind.

If you like the village life but having it 24/7 is too much for you consider fixing the parents place up a bit so it is comfortable for you to spend weekends there and then rent a place in Khon Khen and stay there during the week. Renting an unfurnished house in Issan "cities" can be amazingly cheep. Having a place to stay while looking makes it easy too.

The longer you can stand to wait to build a house the better in my opinion, because the money you put into the house will be virtually impossible to recover. The car you can take with you or resell so that is allot less risky cars are almost never a good investment but at least in Thailand they hold their value longer.

Good luck however it all pans out, keep us posted in future. It is always interesting to see how others are managing the transition, many of the experiences are common to all but how they affect us is different for everyone.

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The various opinions make interesting reading. Anyone that can live a life in an Issan village must have a certain relaxed and understanding approach to life. I guess it is no different to someone in Australia preferring the quiet life of a country town or farm over a big city. I have always lived in cities and could never contemplate a life like that even though I am not far off 60. I need the stimulus that work and an urban environment provides. I have been to Issan and various villages there, not recently, but about 15 years ago. Unless things have changed dramatically, I have no desire to go back. I like my urban comforts. However I can understand how some people enjoy the lifestyle there. We are all different. No one is right or wrong in their choices ( some TV posters may disagree). It's the differences that make people interesting.

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

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Bcgardener very true I worked on a farm in aus for a year and was far more isolated than I would be in isaan. For example where I worked was 3 hours drive to cairns and 80km to the nearest super market. the village had 1 pub 1 shop and a petrol station.

Awesome I would love to live that kind of life for a few months just away from it all. And a pub too! Excellent! :)

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Bcgardener very true I worked on a farm in aus for a year and was far more isolated than I would be in isaan. For example where I worked was 3 hours drive to cairns and 80km to the nearest super market. the village had 1 pub 1 shop and a petrol station.

Awesome I would love to live that kind of life for a few months just away from it all. And a pub too! Excellent! smile.png

Easy , buy a ticket to Cairns, drive out for three hours, find a map and chart 80 km away from nearest supermarket, look for the village with one Pub -Shop-and a Petrol Station ...

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Bcgardener very true I worked on a farm in aus for a year and was far more isolated than I would be in isaan. For example where I worked was 3 hours drive to cairns and 80km to the nearest super market. the village had 1 pub 1 shop and a petrol station.

Awesome I would love to live that kind of life for a few months just away from it all. And a pub too! Excellent! Posted Image

 

 

Easy , buy a ticket to Cairns,  drive out for three hours, find a map and chart 80 km away from  nearest supermarket, look for the village with one Pub -Shop-and a Petrol Station ...

 

Lived in Townsville and Mt Isa over about 6 Month period. Sure are some strange folks out there.

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

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My outlaws are not too far from you in muang phon and over the last 15 years have spent alot of time in the area. We have a diverse group of friends, jewellers, bankers, lawyers, business owners, teachers and farmers all living in the area and as much as I like the outlaws and my thai friends I could never live full time in phon, tried it and lasted 5 months the longest, kk city on the other hand I could easily live in, big city amenities with a rural attitude.

Try it and see how you get on, 6 months will give you a very good idea of what life will be like, dont invest till you are 100% sure.

I used to drive into the city several times a week from phon just to get away from the banality of phon and that is a pretty big town in itself but as with most of bumfcuk thailand, there is very little going on day to day. Being female too gives me a different set of requirements that small town thailand just doesnt offer.

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The Outlaws - that's funny biggrin.png

The OP really reminds me of a very close friend, that was of a similar age at the time, who decided to buy a house and car in Thailand that would be of great benefit to his children.

The outlaws even told him that they loved him more than their own children and how he and his wife would inherit their land when they died etc and how popular he was with everyone.

The whole charade went on for years until the day he told his wife that he would not buy a second house or any other assets in her or the outlaws name but still pay a monthly income.

To cut a long and painful story short, they were filing for divorce within a year and the only people who got any long-term benefit from the assets were the outlaws and not his children.

The Isaan wife was university educated, but got married instead of working, to a farang husband who spoke reasonable Thai, but her priority was always money and face for the outlaws.

A few posters have tried to give some good advice about delaying the investment until some true perspective is gained as otherwise that is all the OP may well be left with in a few years.

Renting is cheap. Why wouldn't you first rent and get to know the area? Next learn some Issan and then announce you plan to build a house on land with a 30+ year lease in your name!

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