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first experince of gf isaan village


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I've had 13 years of them. It's been hell.

Last week I gave the old woman 4mil and said make that work because that's your lot.

I'm finally free.

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What are your plans now? why has it been hell for you?

I really genuinely hope you never have go through it. Hence the reason many caution you here.

I'm not about to re-live it.

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golf sucks. a tepid "sport" for old farts who are past it.

matt - kudos on your decision to bring your kids to the UK. a difficult one but i think you've made the right decision. it grieves me to say but having been a teacher in thailand, the standard of education remains poor, even compared to cambodia, laos and vietnam. cheating and plagiarism are so rife, even at the highest level

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A few replies regarding people's perspectives on what's best for their kids.

<snip>

Education wise, the options are therefore roughly equal results wise. Although lifestyle wise my kids would probably prefer to spend afternoons on the couch watching TV rather than studying with a tutor.

Safety:

Thailand isn't as safe, but just because other people talk on their phones while driving a bike with 3 ppl and no helmets doesn't mean my kids will. With the proper precautions taken, and they will be taken, safety isn't too much of a worry.

<snip>

I think it's very obvious that you want to stay in Thailand regardless of the facts so you have glossed over some very important issues so it suits your biased need.

"safety isn't too much of a worry" - I know 5 people from our village who have been killed in the last 2 years, 3 of them were kids who were doing nothing wrong, 2 of them were killed by their drunk teacher on a Sunday who ran them over and then fled leaving them dying in the road. I witnessed a teenager killed by a hit and run in Phuket who was doing nothing wrong. It honestly isn't too much of a worry for you? Dengue, Malaria, Enterovirus71, etc, not a concern?

You are a teacher and you think that Thailand's education options are equal to NZ?? Would NZ be bottom ranked of all of the ASEAN 3rd world countries too?? Even if you did get a great home tutor and your kids were very receptive I don't think it will make up for the shortfall in 15 years of Thai schools and indoctrination. Why do all the rich Thais send their kids to Australia and UK for schooling if it could be done so well in Thailand with a home tutor?

Either admit you want to stay in Thailand for yourself or reconsider your points because you only get one chance to raise your kids.

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Matt, can I ask why you're waiting 18 months before leaving?

I agree with all your sentiments. I just wondered if it was government procedural stuff.

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Matt, your post overpage #58 is one of the best I read this year, I acknowledged it then and still do now ... clap2.gif

But, let's not fall into the trap that what works for you works for others equally.

Just so you know, when the time our kids arrive, most likely they will be schooled in my Home Country, so I'm not disagreeing with your opinions.

But what works for us, maybe doesn't work for others.

If parents wish to school their children here (Thailand), for what ever reason ... great ... their decision for what ever reason or judgements.

Let's not take this discussion down the road of 'where is the best place to school your kids' as this is the OP's thread asking about 'first-experince-of-gf-isaan-village', and not a schooling thread.

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In about 20 months my son will be 4 and we'll go to the UK a few months before the school year to settle into the UK. It also gives me time to purchase another house in the UK for us to live in, sort out my kid's passports, get married and get my missus her UK visa, etc.

I know your point is "why I don't move back to the UK asap considering my above statement?" but we are extremely close to my gf's family and I think it's best for everyone if I give them as much time with the grandchildren they adore before we move away. The best time for that I believe is when my son is ready to go to school.

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I genuinely thought it may have been red tape.

I've been through it before. Took 6 months to get a family visitor visa.

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Matt, your post overpage #58 is one of the best I read this year, I acknowledged it then and still do now ... clap2.gif

But, let's not fall into the trap that what works for you works for others equally.

Just so you know, when the time our kids arrive, most likely they will be schooled in my Home Country, so I'm not disagreeing with your opinions.

But what works for us, maybe doesn't work for others.

If parents wish to school their children here (Thailand), for what ever reason ... great ... their decision for what ever reason or judgements.

Let's not take this discussion down the road of 'where is the best place to school your kids' as this is the OP's thread asking about 'first-experince-of-gf-isaan-village', and not a schooling thread.

I agree and I wasn't being judgemental, just pointing out some heavy truths that poster may want to think about.

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There are a lot of miserable old sods on thaivisa. Good luck to you my friend. I hope it all works out. I live in a thai village and love it.

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yes i realised you meant an old one biggrin.png been looking at baht sold, think that is the name.

but i see for 550k you can get a 2011 model so as they don't loose much not a bad deal.

Will sort the house first as a car is a luxury.

For 550 you can get a entry level double cab brand new Mazda diesel truck!

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Built the first village house when I was 24. Another ten years later round the corner.

It can be very tough living in a village, can get very irritating and boring all at the same time. However, it grows on you, you'll settle in and it all quietens down within a few months. You must have interests and hobbies, mine are photo'ing things, gardening and DIY. Don't get on the drink.

Oh and it's quite normal for a villager to walk in and start watching the television. Don't be alarmed.

24?

34?

In the village?

You're independently wealthy?

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Malaria etc aren't a concern at all.

Motor vehicle accidents are a concern but they would be in NZ as well. Here more so, but definitely not enough to make me move.

Education is roughly equal, once you factor in home schooling/tutoring. One of my co-workers here helps his son with maths/science/English in addition to the school curriculum. I think he does an awesome job of it and hope that I'll likewise have the time to do the same with my kids, as I think it more than makes up for the deficiencies of the Thai education system.

Particularly as my father never had much time to spend with my brother and I when we were young, because he was always working. As a result I never really knew my father, he passed away when I when I was 8, many family friends etc see it as a result of stress/working too hard. I have always told myself that I'm not going to follow the same path, that I want to spend time with my children, as you never know how much time you have left.

I went to school with a lot of kids from Asian countries. Their parents primarily wanted them to have a western education to learn English (since their parents aren't native English speakers). These kids with their international schools and private tutors usually arrived at my school and blitz'd us in math/science, only their English let them down (and only for the first few years, then they beat us on that too). Deans honors was almost exclusively (maybe 80%) a list of Asian names, particularly when you consider only around 1/4 of the students at my school were Asian. The attitude towards hard work and study was simply ingrained in them from a young age, where studying, doing homework and having a tutor were all "normal", whereas kiwi kids worry about being called a geek or a nerd, since its not part of our culture to study that hard. As such, yes I think tutoring etc can make up for the failings of the Thai education system.

The OP is close enough to Khon Kaen to send their kids to better schools than I'll be able to, so he is fortunate and will be able to put his kids in a good position education wise.

Something surprised me about education comparisons between Thailand and the west. Met a couple the other day who had just returned from the

UK with a 9 year old daughter. Placed her here in a private school in Phuket and found she was way behind her peers who had only been schooled in Thailand.

The daughter by the way is in an EP class doing the standard Thai curriculum and is not in an international school.

You only hear rumours of the bad things about education standards here so good to actually hear something the other way for a change.

I have a great interest in all of this as we have a 2 year old and another on the way so read up and study all I can on the education options open to our family.

Edited by patongphil
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A few replies regarding people's perspectives on what's best for their kids.

Education wise, the options are therefore roughly equal results wise. Although lifestyle wise my kids would probably prefer to spend afternoons on the couch watching TV rather than studying with a tutor.

Safety:

Thailand isn't as safe, but just because other people talk on their phones while driving a bike with 3 ppl and no helmets doesn't mean my kids will. With the proper precautions taken, and they will be taken, safety isn't too much of a worry.

I think it's very obvious that you want to stay in Thailand regardless of the facts so you have glossed over some very important issues so it suits your biased need.

"safety isn't too much of a worry" - I know 5 people from our village who have been killed in the last 2 years, 3 of them were kids who were doing nothing wrong, 2 of them were killed by their drunk teacher on a Sunday who ran them over and then fled leaving them dying in the road. I witnessed a teenager killed by a hit and run in Phuket who was doing nothing wrong. It honestly isn't too much of a worry for you? Dengue, Malaria, Enterovirus71, etc, not a concern?

You are a teacher and you think that Thailand's education options are equal to NZ?? Would NZ be bottom ranked of all of the ASEAN 3rd world countries too?? Even if you did get a great home tutor and your kids were very receptive I don't think it will make up for the shortfall in 15 years of Thai schools and indoctrination. Why do all the rich Thais send their kids to Australia and UK for schooling if it could be done so well in Thailand with a home tutor?

Either admit you want to stay in Thailand for yourself or reconsider your points because you only get one chance to raise your kids.

Malaria etc aren't a concern at all.

Motor vehicle accidents are a concern but they would be in NZ as well. Here more so, but definitely not enough to make me move.

Education is roughly equal, once you factor in home schooling/tutoring. One of my co-workers here helps his son with maths/science/English in addition to the school curriculum. I think he does an awesome job of it and hope that I'll likewise have the time to do the same with my kids, as I think it more than makes up for the deficiencies of the Thai education system.

Particularly as my father never had much time to spend with my brother and I when we were young, because he was always working. As a result I never really knew my father, he passed away when I when I was 8, many family friends etc see it as a result of stress/working too hard. I have always told myself that I'm not going to follow the same path, that I want to spend time with my children, as you never know how much time you have left.

I went to school with a lot of kids from Asian countries. Their parents primarily wanted them to have a western education to learn English (since their parents aren't native English speakers). These kids with their international schools and private tutors usually arrived at my school and blitz'd us in math/science, only their English let them down (and only for the first few years, then they beat us on that too). Deans honors was almost exclusively (maybe 80%) a list of Asian names, particularly when you consider only around 1/4 of the students at my school were Asian. The attitude towards hard work and study was simply ingrained in them from a young age, where studying, doing homework and having a tutor were all "normal", whereas kiwi kids worry about being called a geek or a nerd, since its not part of our culture to study that hard. As such, yes I think tutoring etc can make up for the failings of the Thai education system.

The OP is close enough to Khon Kaen to send their kids to better schools than I'll be able to, so he is fortunate and will be able to put his kids in a good position education wise.

I was a English teacher assistant for a while in a government elementary school. If I have a kid here I will place it in a private or government schools with full time native English teachers....That will be not easy to find in countryside areas....

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