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camerata

Dhamma Quotes

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Here's my all-time favourite book ending, from Venerable Father. It's Ajahn Chah speaking to some monks after describing his practice:

If you practice like this, you do not have to search very far. Friend, why don't you give it a try? There is a boat you can take to the other shore. Why not jump in? Or do you prefer the ooze and the slime? I could paddle away any time, but I am waiting for you.

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Here's my all-time favourite book ending, from Venerable Father. It's Ajahn Chah speaking to some monks after describing his practice:

If you practice like this, you do not have to search very far. Friend, why don't you give it a try? There is a boat you can take to the other shore. Why not jump in? Or do you prefer the ooze and the slime? I could paddle away any time, but I am waiting for you.

Good one. And another from Aj Chah:

Looking for peace is like looking for a turtle with a mustache. You won’t be able to find it. But when your heart is ready, peace will come looking for you.

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Ajahn Chah's last words to Ajahn Sumedho:

Whenever you have feelings of love or hate for anything whatsoever, these will be your aides and partners in building parami. The Buddha-Dharma is not to be found in moving forwards, nor in moving backwards, nor in standing still. This is your place of nonabiding.

from Small Boat, Great Mountain - Theravadan Reflections on The Natural Great Perfection, by Ajahn Amaro.

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Ego needs constant support because it isn't real. We don't have to keep saying, "This is a house. This is a big house. This is an old house." It's obvious. This house exists. But the ego doesn't and therefore it needs constant confirmation. This support comes from our thinking process, and gets additional help from being appreciated and loved, and through sense contacts and our perception of them.

- Ayya Khema, Being Nobody, Going Nowhere.

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As we meditate, we experience some tranquillity, a measure of calm in which the mind has slowed down. When we look at something like a flower with a calm mind, we are looking at it as it is. When there is no grasping — nothing to gain or get rid of — then if what we see, hear or experience through the senses is beautiful, it is truly beautiful. We are not criticising it, comparing it, trying to possess or own it; we find delight and joy in the beauty around us because there is no need to make anything out of it. It is exactly what it is.

- Ajahn Sumedho, The Four Noble Truths.

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Enlightenment is not something you wish for. It is the state that you end up in when all your wishes come to an end.

- Henepola Gunaratana

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The Buddha teaches us to know our duty. The duty of humanity is to practice Dhamma. The duty of humans is to teach humans to be human.

- Luangpor Teean, To one that feels

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The Buddha teaches us to know our duty. The duty of humanity is to practice Dhamma. The duty of humans is to teach humans to be human.

Nice - If I understand it correctly.

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At Savatthi. While once seated, the Venerable Radha asked the Blessed One:

Venerable Sir, one says: Suffering!! What, Venerable Sir, is suffering?

Form, Radha, is suffering, feeling is suffering, perception is suffering, mental constructions are suffering, consciousness is suffering...!!!

Understanding this, Bhikkhus, a well instructed Noble Disciple experiences disgust towards form, disgust towards feeling, disgust towards perception, disgust towards mental construction, & disgust towards consciousness itself! Experiencing disgust, he becomes disillusioned! Through disillusion his mind is released. When it is released, one instantly knows: This mind is liberated, and one understands: Extinguished is birth, this Noble Life is all completed, done is what should be done, there is no state of being beyond this...

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Dhamma is anything and everything (including God?).

To attain Dhamma is to oust anything (concept of defilement) from one's mind and bar everything (concept of defilement-to-be) to enter it.

Just my skeptical thought

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Human hopes and human creeds; have their root in human needs. --Eugene Fitch Ware (Ironquill)

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Nothing comes from focusing on the faults of others. You can get more done by looking at your own faults instead.

- Ajahn Fuang

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Nothing comes from focusing on the faults of others. You can get more done by looking at your own faults instead.

- Ajahn Fuang

This is a good quote camerata, on some occasions it is something I have to keep in mind.

I wonder, is there ever a 'correct' way of criticising someone that keeps in line with the quote.

I read a book once, "The Road Less Travelled". It mentioned it is OK to criticise (or discipline in the case of children) as long as it is done with unconditional love and with the spiritual development of the other person in mind. This approach can be easily twisted with arrogance, so, the author explains, thorough self-analysis concerning motives must be made before the critisism is made to avoid falling into the trap of arrogance. This guy wasn't Buddhist (although his first words in the book was the first noble truth).

I guess the question I am trying to ask is, can critisism of others be made in a proper Buddhist way? If so how?

Edited by Grover

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I guess the question I am trying to ask is, can critisism of others be made in a proper Buddhist way? If so how?

In general, what I do is look at my intention. If there is even a hint of my feeling superior as a result of criticising I know I shouldn't be doing it. I guess the "Buddhist way" is to do it with the sole intent of benefiting someone else. Thais are very good at this in a work environment. If they have to criticise, they'll do it in a very roundabout way, often praising the person who is being criticised and sometimes criticising a whole department instead of the individual to lessen the impact on the person at fault.

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Trying to win out over other people brings nothing but animosity and bad karma. It's better to win out over yourself.

- Ajahn Fuang

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