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Time I got sober!

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Stay out of the beer bars. Watch out for temptation from those who do drink. There are many triggers to make you want to have "just one more". It is a compete lifestyle transformation.

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Good Luck - at this point in time you will become aware of who your real friends are !! It's not an easy road - but hang in there !

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I wish you well. The response to your laying of your chest bare has elicited a generous and heartwarming response from contributors which makes a nice change from much of the material. Try not to be alone, preferably seeking the company of somebody who knows all about your new mission.

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As a recovering Alcholic myself, I am glad to hear you took the first step, there is 12 steps to this program and its one step at a time. After 28 years of being sober I have to remind myself often that I am only one drink away for being drunk. That and with the help of my higher power, I will be sober the rest of my life. Its all about the first drink. Like you, I could not quit after the first drink. Good luck to you and if I can help in any way please let me know. As this is part of the 12th step. Please go to an AA meeting, find a sponser and work the steps. You will be surprised in no time. It just keeps getting better.

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As a recovering Alcholic myself, I am glad to hear you took the first step, there is 12 steps to this program and its one step at a time. After 28 years of being sober I have to remind myself often that I am only one drink away for being drunk. That and with the help of my higher power, I will be sober the rest of my life. Its all about the first drink. Like you, I could not quit after the first drink. Good luck to you and if I can help in any way please let me know. As this is part of the 12th step. Please go to an AA meeting, find a sponser and work the steps. You will be surprised in no time. It just keeps getting better.

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best advice i canoffer is not to tell anyone you have given up and NEVER take pride in telling peopel you have not had a dirnk in XXX days/months.years as the telling can make you fell like you have achieved your goal and then you start drinking again. Same applies to stoppign smoking or any other vice for that matter.

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I really need to do same but weak. i even think i am now allergic to alcohol

sounds like you're allergic to lack of alcohol

that's not allergic - probably withdrawal symptoms!

He might be referring to feeling sickly when drinking. This is probably your body's attempt to tell you "Enough you bastard!! Quit punishing me!!" But we soldier on through it and as the pain-killing effect kicks in around pint #3, it doesn't seem so bad.

Following a week of weaning, I'm on day five of staying away from the booze on the heels of at least two years of daily drinking. I was conducting an interview a couple of weeks ago hung over (I can still do the job in that state, but I realised that the guys I was interviewing - both of them sharp and well presented - needed only to take one look at my face (never mind smell my breath from two paces) to make an accurate guess at where my priorities lie. I felt exposed and somewhat pathetic.

It's time to take a serious break and do a bit of clear-headed reflection. I'm not necessarily planning to stay off forever, but every time I do this, I'm amazed by how good it feels, and how I start dealing with problems that were being ignored, or that I was blaming on someone else - it is easy to talk yourself into a self righteous viewpoint when intoxicated... The wife is happier, work is easier, the money in my wallet stops disappearing on me, and my head is far more clear. And man, you have some intense dreams. A break is the best place to make a start when quitting forever seems unthinkable.

Good luck to the OP. I'd recommend attending at least one AA meeting. You don't have to confess to being an alcoholic - a big stumbling block for many of us - you can just sit in. They are very welcoming and understand all the different stages people can be at. You hear stories from guys who seriously hit rock bottom and lost everything - car, wife, house, job, the love of their children and their self-esteem... Some dove into alcoholism from the outset, while for others it took decades for the addiction to take hold. These are excellent cautionary tales, reminding you that you don't have to wait until your life has collapsed to do something about it.

I hope that doesn't sound preachy... To each his own, but for me, I can see growing problems on the horizon that I'd sooner avoid.

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Congratulations on taking the first step. Many of us have had cause to question our relationship with alcohol, fewer have managed to correct it.

You have taken the first step, and the good news is there is plenty of support available here on the forum. Don't be afraid to ask for advice. wai.gif

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As a recovering Alcholic myself, I am glad to hear you took the first step, there is 12 steps to this program and its one step at a time. After 28 years of being sober I have to remind myself often that I am only one drink away for being drunk. That and with the help of my higher power, I will be sober the rest of my life. Its all about the first drink. Like you, I could not quit after the first drink. Good luck to you and if I can help in any way please let me know. As this is part of the 12th step. Please go to an AA meeting, find a sponser and work the steps. You will be surprised in no time. It just keeps getting better.

A lot of people have a problem with the "higher power" step of the AA program - the world is teeming with atheists (Fox News is right!) I think this scares away a lot of people. An atheist friend who has been at AA for two years, with great success, told me that his higher power is 'gravity' - and you don't get much more powerful than that.

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"I also think you are being irresponsible in glibly dismissing AA as "susbtituting one addiction for another" and being based on a concept of being"a hopeless sinner". I have never heard any of these concepts in any meetings I have attended on four continents over the last ten years. If AA was based on being a "hopeless sinner" it would have crashed decades ago. Sober alcoholics as a general rule don't want sinfulness and conventional religion even though many of us, myself included, find ways to re-connect with religion as we get sober."

My view, which is my view, and you are entitled to yours, is that people get addicted to meetings. I agree that it is better than drinking. And the dire warnings that if one doesn't continue going to meetings, they will surely slip back into drink. There is a group think element to AA, and one doesn't like to risk bringing up topics that go against the canon of AA. The twelve steps include at least two religious elements: 1. I am powerless 2. I give myself over to a higher power. Which, by extension, means you are lower, right? Christianity hasn't crashed, so why should AA? AA is like a crutch, and crutches are fine if you have a broken leg. But when the leg heals, give up the crutch. But the idea that a person will be an alcoholic always (and of course spread the word, another religious facet, come to think of it) is a bit of a stretch. AA also has no better success rate than any other recovery plan. Drinking too much is a behavior, not a disease (people don't wake up and say "I think I'll have cancer today" but they do the behavior of picking up the drink), so deal with the behavior and remove the label "alcoholic", which seems a permanent identification. The only label that fits humans is "human" or some other physical characteristic. Beyond that is behavior, which is influenced by belief systems, such as the one promoted by AA. I suggest that if you want to be free of drinking, do it in a manner that respects your individual dignity and ability to make choices and follow up on that. It is harder in that you would have to take responsibility for your life and choices, but there is an element of freedom that is worth the effort. If you want to stop a behavior, stop the behavior. And yes, I have been to meetings.

Alcohol is a drug and effects people differently. Some can and do use it for relaxation without any problems. Some become violent when taking it, whilst others become addicted. If you are prone to becoming addicted to alcohol, and you will know that, then you have the choice to drink it or not. If you are wise, you will choose not to drink as it will ruin your life, just like any other addiction. This is indeed a behaviour choice. Similarly those who become violent when taking alcohol need to consider the wisdom of using this drug. It lessens the ability to reason and some people cannot handle this.

I'm not anti-alcohol per se. My late father was in the trade for many years, and I worked part-time in nightclubs for many years too. That gave me the opportunity to see the effects alcohol has on different people. It's a drug that effects people's physical and mental capability. Over use will give bad effects, and some people are more intolerant than others.

To the OP - given your circumstances, you have made a wise and sensible decision sir. I wish you good luck and hope you maintain your sobriety. As many posters have said, avoid that first drink. You are taking the drug back into your system.

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I found it easier than I expected. Been sober for 4 years 10 months and 7 days. Good Luck to you.

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Wishing you all the best. I had trouble giving up smoking but with the help and understanding of my wife and our daughter, managed to do it several years ago.

Just remember... If you "fall off the wagon" and I hope you don't but just GET BACK ON THE WAGON ans as others here have said, let us know how you're going....at least we can offer you our support!

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