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kevvy

Feeling my age

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I'll never get to 10,000 posts at this rate. laugh.png

With your advancing age do you feel your ageing finger joints with all the typing get creakier with all the rain?

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The rust it causes makes my keyboard stiffer and my aged fingers struggle to type more than a few lines a day.

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I am 69 now and I know and accept that I cannot do some of the things I could do at 60. Physical things I did at 50 so easily were harder at 60 and virtually impossible at 69.

When I was in my 20s in the military I was fit . On leave I got a job in a fruit and veg firm and with a mate we could load and unload and stack 5 tons of spuds in 50kg sacks in 20 minutes.

Now just moving one 50 kg sack is difficult unless I pick it off the truck bed around the middle and that one buggers me up for a while. Lifting it off the floor is a no-no.

Now I have learned to cook properly and I am slowly writing about my life and doing things that require less physical effort and that I CAN do.

My next plan in life is to see my son through Uni or Tech what ever he chooses and as he is only 9 it is a bit of a longer term plan.

I only speak to him and his friends in English to teach them another language and he translates for me if they don't understand.

I would love to learn Thai but being partly deaf and tone deaf doesn't make life that easy.

OP my advice is to accept whatever you CAN do and look back at the things you could do and get somebody else to do the hard work.

Both my Mum and my Dad died at 69 and my brother was 6 weeks short of his 82nd birthday when he died so I know I have to do better than that.

And I will.

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Every time I see an older guy in good shape I admire their spirit.

You don't have to move mountains but you must continue to move.

[email protected]#k aches and pains, we all have them. Don't surrender, don't give in gracefully, every day is a gift, ask anyone who has dodged the bullet.

Good luck to all.

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I am 69 now and I know and accept that I cannot do some of the things I could do at 60. Physical things I did at 50 so easily were harder at 60 and virtually impossible at 69.

When I was in my 20s in the military I was fit . On leave I got a job in a fruit and veg firm and with a mate we could load and unload and stack 5 tons of spuds in 50kg sacks in 20 minutes.

Now just moving one 50 kg sack is difficult unless I pick it off the truck bed around the middle and that one buggers me up for a while. Lifting it off the floor is a no-no.

Now I have learned to cook properly and I am slowly writing about my life and doing things that require less physical effort and that I CAN do.

My next plan in life is to see my son through Uni or Tech what ever he chooses and as he is only 9 it is a bit of a longer term plan.

I only speak to him and his friends in English to teach them another language and he translates for me if they don't understand.

I would love to learn Thai but being partly deaf and tone deaf doesn't make life that easy.

OP my advice is to accept whatever you CAN do and look back at the things you could do and get somebody else to do the hard work.

Both my Mum and my Dad died at 69 and my brother was 6 weeks short of his 82nd birthday when he died so I know I have to do better than that.

And I will.

I know you will , I too love to cook and Heston Blumenthal is my favourite chef . If you've ever been through a major life transition, physically and psychologically, all of us will experience it several times during our lives, exchanging one identity for another.Instead of dwelling on hopes and fears about an unknowable future, focus your attention on whatever is happening right now.I know I do this. As I have said I am excited about "my new life"

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Every time I see an older guy in good shape I admire their spirit.

You don't have to move mountains but you must continue to move.

[email protected]#k aches and pains, we all have them. Don't surrender, don't give in gracefully, every day is a gift, ask anyone who has dodged the bullet.

Good luck to all.

mmmm maybe you came and visited me when I was in hospital and I told you to go (your avatar) Life is a gift now and I will never forget it. Live it, love it, enjoy it.

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I am 69 now and I know and accept that I cannot do some of the things I could do at 60. Physical things I did at 50 so easily were harder at 60 and virtually impossible at 69.

When I was in my 20s in the military I was fit . On leave I got a job in a fruit and veg firm and with a mate we could load and unload and stack 5 tons of spuds in 50kg sacks in 20 minutes.

Now just moving one 50 kg sack is difficult unless I pick it off the truck bed around the middle and that one buggers me up for a while. Lifting it off the floor is a no-no.

Now I have learned to cook properly and I am slowly writing about my life and doing things that require less physical effort and that I CAN do.

My next plan in life is to see my son through Uni or Tech what ever he chooses and as he is only 9 it is a bit of a longer term plan.

I only speak to him and his friends in English to teach them another language and he translates for me if they don't understand.

I would love to learn Thai but being partly deaf and tone deaf doesn't make life that easy.

OP my advice is to accept whatever you CAN do and look back at the things you could do and get somebody else to do the hard work.

Both my Mum and my Dad died at 69 and my brother was 6 weeks short of his 82nd birthday when he died so I know I have to do better than that.

And I will.

I know you will , I too love to cook and Heston Blumenthal is my favourite chef . If you've ever been through a major life transition, physically and psychologically, all of us will experience it several times during our lives, exchanging one identity for another.Instead of dwelling on hopes and fears about an unknowable future, focus your attention on whatever is happening right now.I know I do this. As I have said I am excited about "my new life"

Enjoy your life and make the best of what you can with what you have. If you can't do something one way then try a different way.

When we were building the house and fencing the land one guy was carrying the concrete fence posts. He was skinny as a rake and looked as though a strong wind would blow him away. I still see him around but he doesn't do much humping these days. The time I am talking about was 9 years ago when I was 60 and he was over 70 then. Been a farmer and labourer all his life and it was his skill and what he knew.

On the other hand if you gave him a computer he would be lost. Horses for courses.

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What i cannot understand is some members write some nasty posts or anything that hurts other members you want to close . why do the ones who want to keep the post open have to suffer. Old age is bad enough and when we like a post that is our enjoyment i get my walking stick now

Sent from my GT-I9500 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

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I am 69 now and I know and accept that I cannot do some of the things I could do at 60. Physical things I did at 50 so easily were harder at 60 and virtually impossible at 69.

 

When I was in my 20s in the military I was fit . On leave I got a job in a fruit and veg firm and with a mate we could load and unload and stack 5 tons of spuds in 50kg sacks in 20 minutes.

 

Now just moving one 50 kg sack is difficult unless I pick it off the truck bed around the middle and that one buggers me up for a while. Lifting it off the floor is a no-no.

 

Now I have learned to cook properly and I am slowly writing about my life and doing things that require less physical effort and that I CAN do.

 

My next plan in life is to see my son through Uni or Tech what ever  he chooses and as he is only 9 it is a bit of a longer term plan.

 

I only speak to him and his friends in English to teach them another language and he translates for me if they don't understand.

 

I would love to learn Thai but being partly deaf and tone deaf doesn't make life that easy.

 

OP my advice is to accept whatever you CAN do and look back at the things you could do and get somebody else to do the hard work.

 

Both my Mum and my Dad died at 69 and my brother was 6 weeks short of his 82nd birthday when he died so I know I have to do better than that.

  

And I will.

 

I know you will , I too love to cook and Heston Blumenthal is my favourite chef .  If you've ever been through a major life transition,  physically and psychologically, all of us will experience it several times during our lives, exchanging one identity for another.Instead of dwelling on hopes and fears about an unknowable future, focus your attention on whatever is happening right now.I know I do this. As I have said I am excited about "my new life"

 

 

Enjoy your life and make the best of what you can with what you have. If you can't do something one way then try a different way.

 

When we were building the house and fencing the land one guy was carrying the concrete fence posts. He was skinny as a rake and looked as though a strong wind would blow him away. I still see him around but he doesn't do much humping these days. The time I am talking about was 9 years ago when I was 60 and he was over 70 then. Been a farmer and labourer all his life and it was his skill and what he knew.

 

On the other hand if you gave him a computer he would be lost. Horses for courses.

 

I have seen many older men in AUstralia that cannot do half the stuff that the THai men do at the same age . I would like to find out life expectancy here

Sent from my GT-I9500 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

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I have seen many older men in AUstralia that cannot do half the stuff that the THai men do at the same age . I would like to find out life expectancy here

This graph does not show farang.

Given you live, behave and eat like the average Thai man, this should give an indication.

ThaiLifeExpect.png

[edit] I won't search, instead I ask here tactfully, if there is a statistic about foreigners.
Edited by Dancealot
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I suspect that life expectancy tables have a lot to do with infant mortality rate.

Poor quality water and limited funds for medication would effect this but once a child has survived the first few years I wonder what their life expectancy would be then?

Farang probably out live most farm laborers, we eat better, maybe not drink less in some cases but drink better, have better access to doctors and hospitals and in many cases our families have a vested interest in keeping us alive. cool.png

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