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pickledvegtables

Sea Salt sold along coastal highways.

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I use it for cooking. Available in most Ma and Pa grocery stores by the kilo.

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I would re-check as to whether "road salt" is as clean as salt meant for the table, but yes, they do sell sea salt in the stores for cooking purposes. I hope everyone realizes that all salt is sea salt. Salt has never been found where there wasn't currently or formerly a sea. The term "sea salt" many times is just used as a marketing tool to make you think it is a different and better salt. Chemical components of salt is the same in all pure salt.

In most cases the term sea salt is meant to be meaning it is coarser in texture, which has a different perspective when used on a food dish by giving a different mouth feel. If you dissolve it in a water or soup base, there is no difference between what they like to call seal salt versus regular table salt.

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Brought a quality ceramic sea salt grinder over from the UK. Filled it with Thai "sea salt", after a few twists the grinder was knackered.thumbsup.gif

It's normally what you would find being flung out of the back of a gritter vehicle in Winter.

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I know that all salt comes from the sea. What I was referring to was the salt harvested by locals and sold in unmarked bags. I also know that Thailand has several sea salt harvesting plants and process to food grade iodized table salt. Table salt may also contain anti-caking ingredients. I have not found any non-iodized salt marketed at the food grade.

I purchased some small crystal salt and was disappointed as I started to find small grey and black stones.

I prefer non-iodized salt for brine, cures and pickling as it tends to keep the food from getting dark from the iodine.

Edited by pickledvegtables

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^Someone did a survey in Thailand that linked low IQ's in children to lack of Iodine in their diet.. (Bit off-topic, but bear with me).

Thaivisa carried the story a few years ago: http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/393629-iodine-deficiency-blamed-for-low-iq-among-thai-children/

Most commercial salt manufacturers have since been urged to put Iodine in their product.

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^Someone did a survey in Thailand that linked low IQ's in children to lack of Iodine in their diet.. (Bit off-topic, but bear with me).

Thaivisa carried the story a few years ago: http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/393629-iodine-deficiency-blamed-for-low-iq-among-thai-children/

Most commercial salt manufacturers have since been urged to put Iodine in their product.

Your absolutely right, that iodine in table salt is a great idea for children’s health. I just see a missed opportunity for the salt industry to provide non-iodized salt to the culinary community (nationals, expats, restaurants, sausage / bacon producers, etc.).
The salt producers probable provide non-iodized salt to the commercial industry, I just have not found the source. Anyone know a supplier? MAKRO does not even carry it.
Edited by pickledvegtables

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On 10/16/2013 at 3:51 AM, stoli said:

I would re-check as to whether "road salt" is as clean as salt meant for the table, but yes, they do sell sea salt in the stores for cooking purposes. I hope everyone realizes that all salt is sea salt. Salt has never been found where there wasn't currently or formerly a sea. The term "sea salt" many times is just used as a marketing tool to make you think it is a different and better salt. Chemical components of salt is the same in all pure salt.

In most cases the term sea salt is meant to be meaning it is coarser in texture, which has a different perspective when used on a food dish by giving a different mouth feel. If you dissolve it in a water or soup base, there is no difference between what they like to call seal salt versus regular table salt.

But there is fact which suggests that sea salt is have more minerals than the salt came out from underground sits.

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If you get out of your car and ask they will take you round the salt flats very interesting. Their salt contains many minerals and no added bits. Far better to cook with than the stuff you buy in the supermarkets. We have been using it for years. It's also very mild, might sound funny but less salty.

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On 10/16/2013 at 3:51 AM, stoli said:

I would re-check as to whether "road salt" is as clean as salt meant for the table, but yes, they do sell sea salt in the stores for cooking purposes. I hope everyone realizes that all salt is sea salt. Salt has never been found where there wasn't currently or formerly a sea. The term "sea salt" many times is just used as a marketing tool to make you think it is a different and better salt. Chemical components of salt is the same in all pure salt.

In most cases the term sea salt is meant to be meaning it is coarser in texture, which has a different perspective when used on a food dish by giving a different mouth feel. If you dissolve it in a water or soup base, there is no difference between what they like to call seal salt versus regular table salt.

You are correct to some extent but most of the salt bought in the big super markets is processed in plants the salt is cleaned and in many cases dyed to ensure a standard color and different additives can be added to enhance the product. What people like to think about sea salt being a better product is this lack of processing. collected in ponds left to dry then collected, bagged and sold

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