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% of Thais liking/disliking Farangs


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About 50% of Americans dislike the other 50% intensely and feel major indifference to another 49% (which is probably representative of most countries), and I would say in Thailand most of the farangs dislike most of the other farangs with maybe only a few exceptions for personal friends.

Thai's seem to have a fundamental dislike of Farangs. = No smile

I would certainly not smile at random farangs. That would invite disaster in one form or another. Probably the people with the stone-faced expression have to work 12 hours a day, 29 days a month for poverty level wages. Would you smile?

Anyway what is with this constant paranoia with being liked or not liked. Do you really think back in your home country that most service personnel who may or may not conjure up a smile for you actually love you or even respect you?

Dont-mistake-this-fake-smile.jpg

They're rioting in Africa
They're starving in Spain
There's hurricanes in Florida and Texas needs rain

The whole world is festering with unhappy souls
The French hate the Germans
The Germans hate the Poles

Italians hate Yugoslavs
South Africans hate the Dutch
And I don't like anybody very much

But we can be tranquil and thankful
And proud for man's been endowed
With a mushroom shaped cloud

And we know for certain that
Some lovely day someone will set the spark off
And we will all be blown away

They're rioting in Africa
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What nature doesn't do to us will be done by our fellow man

Read more: Kingston Trio - Merry Minuet Lyrics | MetroLyrics

Edited by Suradit69
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my first experience of a farang in thaland was when I first went to Rayong. he came into the petrol station f'ing this and f'ing that towards his '''girlfriend'', drunk, and shouting at the poor girl behind the counter. he was English. I felt quite shocked at his rudeness. not sure where he was heading but maybe a little further south perhaps

where I live in Thailand I always use my local family store for my beer. I always go in with a smile, and talk a little to them. they are very nice to me. the small store gets other types of farangs come in, for beer, etc. I have seen them go in. no smile, don't talk, and just not very friendly. my wife uses the store as well, and the store owner always says to my wife how lovely and friendly I am, and that she likes me.

Thailand has many great western people living there of course, but of course it has a lot of <deleted> as well. so I guess thai people will have mixed views of western people in Thailand, depending on their own experiences.

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I never see a farang in my moobahn,so i've only got Thai friends and they've always been very welcoming towards me,in fact it's almost a criminal offence should i pass their house on my bike without stopping for a beer.It surely also helps that i'm married to a lovely Thai lady,and i'm familiar with the good,the bad and the ugly of the moobahn,but even the bad and the ugly are always most respectful towards me.On the whole I've no complaints,but you're quite correct in stating,that it's mainly the uneducated as is the case in most other countries that harbour such nationalistic opinions.Like it or not most of the world is now multi-cultural,but for me this is a good thing.God gave the earth to everyone.

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I think that rather than liking or disliking farang, the people you see are simply liking or disliking you specifically (No disrespect intended)

The fact that you're farang might have some bearing on that, and make them lean more one way or another. Particularly as many are intimidated by farang, as they think that we'll speak English to them.

The factors which influence how they think about you include factors like the following:

The way you look - Not just skin colour, but also your age, how you dress, your weight and simply whether you're handsome or not.

The way you act - Do they always see you in bars or drinking? Do you have a good respectable job? Do act how a "good" person should act?

The way you communicate - Do you speak Thai? Do you complain about things? Do you speak softly (In either Thai/Isaan/English) and show respect, patience and deference?

The way you try to understand Thai culture - Do you have trouble accepting "Thai style", do you participate in Thai cultural events? Do you know what you should/shouldn't do?

Also because we are farang, we are often considered to be a different species of animal (At least in the countryside anyway). Their previous interactions with farang will influence their perceptions of us, much the same as if you'd only ever seen one dog and it was a rabid soi dog that tried to bite you, you'd think that all dogs were bad. Therefore if they have only seen farang barking out complaints and refusing to pay for their meal over something trivial like a hair in their meal (Which Thai people would likely accept is part and parcel of eating at a street restaurant), then they'll probably have a negative perception of farang before they even start to think about the other factors I've listed above. Likewise if they've always had positive experiences with farang, then they'll likely start with a positive outlook regarding farang.

In my experience, most of the people in the town which I live have a very positive perspective towards farang. Some want to take advantage of us, although only maybe 5%, if that, as the rest of the people like that have already gone to work in Phuket/Pattaya lol. Quite a few are very hesitant around us, they are scared that we might speak English to them, however if we speak Thai to them then they're much more relaxed (Although often don't get it the first time as they're not really listening because they expect to hear English).

When I first came to the town I'm in, the people who were scared of farang was probably a lot higher than what it is now, however with my school having 3-4 farang teachers for the past 3 years, almost all of which can speak Thai reasonably well, they've lost a lot of that fear. Of course some are still scared, and some still try to rip us off, but in general 90% of the people in town just treat us as if we were Thai (With the occasional comments about our Thai etc if they haven't spoken to us before personally). Haha it almost makes me like the town less than when we started, as we're no longer really special here, since they've become soo used to us.

Excellent post, obviously lived here for a few years and knows whats what, as oppossed to our regualar 2 week millionaires.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I would a agree with Uptheos. Most, in my experience, are completely indifferent to us.

Up country, i find myself being treated with curiosity/interest and mild humor and of course a lot of indifference as well.

And of course there's the inappropriate guy who asks my wife if it's OK for him to hug me. The after the hug he spends way too much time examining my white forearms and while smiling and continuing to touch me.

Good times in Isaan.

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Particularly with rural thais they do not trust anyone outside their family group. This means if you study their attitudes to other thais you may find that they are not disimilar to those shown a foreigner. It is possible the a well presented "repectable" foreigner may in fact be treated better than a similar thai. WIth foreigners they do not have centuries of stories of what people of that family did to us to affect the relationship. It is a real case of the McKoys in thailand.

Edited by harrry
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Surprised not much was said about JOBS. In my opinion any resentment or dislike would stem from the Thai's thinking that the Farang has taken a Thai Job.

When i first moved here the first question was "Where You Work?" After a few "Iam retired and NO WORK" explainations the villagers quit asking. Every once in a while i would get a "Farang Go Home" yelled as some Ahole passed but even that has slowed to nothing.

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I think that rather than liking or disliking farang, the people you see are simply liking or disliking you specifically (No disrespect intended)

The fact that you're farang might have some bearing on that, and make them lean more one way or another. Particularly as many are intimidated by farang, as they think that we'll speak English to them.

Well, my experiences show something different.

I lived with my ex-GF in Kut Chap, Udon Thani. As her sister has a market stall I was there quite often.

Also we passed the marked nearly daily to choose lunch and dinner .

So the most of the market people knew us and from some I got a "Hello" or a smile.

One day an older lady (65-75) was shopping at the market and as she saw me she said something containing "Farang" - so I looked at her sharply and she speeded up coming out of the reach on my looks. The market ladys around us started to laugh.

So even in places where you regularly see farangs (10-30 in this market per day I would guess) some people are not used to us and react "in a special way"

Bye,

Derk

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Surprised not much was said about JOBS. In my opinion any resentment or dislike would stem from the Thai's thinking that the Farang has taken a Thai Job.

When i first moved here the first question was "Where You Work?" After a few "Iam retired and NO WORK" explainations the villagers quit asking. Every once in a while i would get a "Farang Go Home" yelled as some Ahole passed but even that has slowed to nothing.

I think most/all Thai people know that we're not taking their jobs. Most farang here don't work, and most of the farang who do work, are teachers (Which automatically grants a certain level of respect).

Some of the Thai teachers do get a bit jealous that we do less work and are often paid more than they are, even if we have no teaching experience or qualifications. However they also generally understand that we're a different species of fish to them.

There is a small minority who don't like us, and some who just want to try and take the piss out of us, particularly if they think we can't understand Thai/Isaan. But I generally find that both groups are pretty small.

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