Jump to content
BANGKOK
Sign in to follow this  
bundoi

What motivates you ?

Recommended Posts

I think the question is framed as simpy as it can be.

... What motivates you?

PS This is an English Teacher's forum inThailand

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me (in a teaching context) it'd be:

Success

Respect

Responsibility

Creative input

Competition

Money (kinda)

If I do something, I enjoy seeing the students have successfully learnt if.

If the people are respectful, then I'll always do my best to help them. Although if someone refuses to try, I think it's disrespectful of them to expect others to carry them.

If I'm allocated a task, and I have responsibility and authority for that task, I'll be significantly more motivated than if I'm just asked to help out.

Likewise if I have a creative input in the decision making process for anything, then I'll be more motivated towards achieving the goal.

I'm also motivated by winning, by being the best. Although when teaching this only comes up when I coach students for the Skills competitions (And I'm rarely given complete responsibility so am less motivated)

Money isn't really a motivator for me, but it'll make me do things which I otherwise wouldn't have done. I see the amount of money I'm paid, as being reflective of the amount of respect my employer has for me. It also reflects how successful I am in my job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's remember that some of our teachers do not teach English. Some teach other subjects. Most will teach in English, however.

I find it very interesting to figure out how students learn. There is quite a difference between the young ones and the older ones, of course. Some learn auditorily, some are more visual. It's also interesting to find out what motivates different students. Most boys, around puberty, will start speaking more. They are mostly interested in girls and sports (usually football). Girls tend to get a lot more shy and are harder to teach, but they usually already have a firm grip on the language so they continue to progress.

As long as there are secrets to the process, I am motivated.

Of course, on a day-to-day basis, things like overcrowded classrooms, excessive noise, uncooperative directors tend to get in the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well Sly and Scott thanks for your replies, you are the gatekeepers of the forum ;-)

my question is really more fundamental , about teachers in classrooms, how do you know (or believe) you have done a good job ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite is when I give them a challenging assignment and they say OMG! No way! (actual quotes)

And then they do it (successfully) and you see the pride in their faces. I get such a kick out of that.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

rijb thank you so much for genuine real life feedback

one of my favourites is "teacher, ask me a different question"

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a teacher,but have just had a friend return to the UK a very despondent man.Before he left he told me that the Thai's are just not interested in learning.He was teaching 18 year olds and instead of learning were more intent on playing with their mobile phones,which in my opinion should be banned from the classroom.

He also said he managed while here, to get a bit,but not enough work teaching Japanese and Koreans,who apparently listened attentively and showed a great willingness to learn.Here again in my opinion,lies the difference between the 3 countries.2 are top countries,while Thailand is well down in the learning stakes,so it's with little wonder that we see a post on Thai visa today,the link i've provided below.

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/689433-thailand-lagging-behind-in-english/?utm_source=newsletter-20131216-08

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm good at what I do, I enjoy teaching, but mostly, I get a charge out of watching others develop their skills.
It's as simpy as that.

Edited by connda
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

teaching Japanese and Koreans,who apparently listened attentively and showed a great willingness to learn.Here again in my opinion,lies the difference between the 3 countries.2 are top countries,while Thailand is well down in the learning stakes,so it's with little wonder that we see a post on Thai visa today,the link i've provided below.

But Japanese and Koreans might have different motivations for learning. They don't have the uber fertile land and climate as in LOS, and are more inerdependent on other countries. I read Japan imports a major percentage of its food. That may be the reason they (and Chinese students) have a better reputation: more motivation to learn.

OP many teachers are retirees or temporary younger people looking for "experience". And then a few (or more than a few) who are teaching for the wrong reasons...

Edited by squarethecircle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What motivates teachers is probably different than what motivates students. You are dealing with an entirely different sub-set of students when you are teaching Japanese or Korean children that live in Thailand. The families are probably quite different from the average family from their home countries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a teacher,but have just had a friend return to the UK a very despondent man.Before he left he told me that the Thai's are just not interested in learning.He was teaching 18 year olds and instead of learning were more intent on playing with their mobile phones,which in my opinion should be banned from the classroom.

He also said he managed while here, to get a bit,but not enough work teaching Japanese and Koreans,who apparently listened attentively and showed a great willingness to learn.Here again in my opinion,lies the difference between the 3 countries.2 are top countries,while Thailand is well down in the learning stakes,so it's with little wonder that we see a post on Thai visa today,the link i've provided below.

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/689433-thailand-lagging-behind-in-english/?utm_source=newsletter-20131216-08

I teach Koreans, but speaking generally I find them charming non-learners.

Very sociable, but just not prepared to work as individuals.

They can't understand why it's wrong for one to do the work, and all the rest to copy.

Giving them an exam is a nightmare as they simply can't understand why they shouldn't talk during the exam.

In my opinion Thais are one-up on them.

They have a more individualistic outlook.

But it's in the Thai culture to try and negotiate an easy answer.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...