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1 Month Still Cravings. Is This Normal?

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Its either I have to smoke or I have to eat or do something.

Does anyone know when (if ever) Ill go back to normal?

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You'll get occasional flare-ups for a while, less often as time goes on. After six months they pretty much completely dissapear. You'll find if you ignore them, or just have a glass of water or something, they'll pass quickly. :o

cv

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It takes a while but each month it gets less and less and eventually you won't even think about it anymore. Try drinking green tea or Valerian tea. Exercise is always good.

I smoked off and on for eight years but have been smoke free for two years now. I don't think about it anymore and hate the smell of smoke (tobacco that is). I can now walk up stairs without wheezing and swim more than a few laps without nearly passing out. I feel completely normal now and ciggies are not in my frame of reference at all.

Good luck!!!

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Hiya jimbob,

Activity of any kind will help you by occupying your mind and letting you focus on something else,

exercise in particular as suggested is ideal if you are fit enough.

Scroll through the stop smoking forum for lots of good advice from people in your situation.

Good luck

marshbags :o:D:D

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We are all different and I've known friends with little craving and others who had a long adjustment.

Personally, I quit cigarettes many years ago -- after some 15 years or so. I had cravings but switched to a pipe and that took care of the cigarettes. Nearly 30 years ago, now, I had a serious asthma attack and finally quit the pipe, cold turkey. A respiratory arrest at the hospital made that easier.

However, after all these years, I still get a pang. I no longer care for cigarettes but, when I smell someone smoking a pipe, I feel a strong temptation to go back.

Perhaps I should add that I've had a weight problem ever since I stopped. I've gone from a medium shirt to an XXL in those years!

Edited by lanny

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Its either I have to smoke or I have to eat or do something.

Does anyone know when (if ever) Ill go back to normal?

I hate to keep quoting to people, but to be honest www.whyquit.com explains it much better than I ever can.

I'd quit but withdrawal never ends! - False! If you remain 100% nicotine free for just 72 hours, your blood will become nicotine free, your withdrawal anxieties will peak in intensity and the number of psychological craves will peak in number. The greatest challenge will be over. Within 10 days to two weeks, actual physical withdrawal is substantially complete as your mind has physically adjusted to the absence of nicotine and accustomed to natural brain dopamine levels. What then remains will be to encounter and recondition your remaining psychological habit crave triggers and to learn to live with the millions of smoking memories stored deep within your mind. You will experience your first day of total quit comfort, where you never once even "think" about a cigarette or smoking, by at least day ninety. The sad part is that you won't even realize that it has happened. After the first such day, they grow more and more frequent until they become your new norm. The deep sense of lasting comfort and calmness that awaits you is probably beyond your comprehension. The real "you" is in total control!

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Thanks for support and replies people. Yeah I disagree with that quote, because the first 2 weeks I didnt really have any cravings, well it was kinda like I quit for 2 weeks, then went to a rave and smoked 10 which is a lot for me as I used to only smoke 5-10 a day. After the rave I had no cravings to smoke at all for a fortnight then every now and again I get that feeling in my lungs, like an itch that needs scratching. Im ashamed to admit it but I made a small roll up last night. I was in heaven again hehe :o

Todays been okay....

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Its either I have to smoke or I have to eat or do something.

Does anyone know when (if ever) Ill go back to normal?

first time posting not sure how to add on or just to pic one to reply to..

My experience with quitting smoking is that its tough and many people fail time and time again. Including myself.

One day I was talking to a friend who told me of a book she used to 'quit' drinking. She told me the concepts in about 15mins and I haven't smoked or really wanted to or had cravings since. I became a non-smoker. i didn't 'quit'.

Now I know different things work for different people. However the logic of this book is huge to me. Its actually written for booze and drugs but you can apply to smoking no prob.

I borrowed the book just to see (she only read two chapters and became a non-drinker). I read a couple chapters and really could not be bothered with the rest as I was never going to smoke again... I kept reading to see ifd I could learn more and it all made sense but.. just didn't need to.

If anyone is serious about making a commitment to never smoke again. This book is, in my experience, is unbeatable. If you are just gonna quit and see how long it lasts you're in for a long battle. IMO

"Rational Recovery" is the title (sorry can't remember author)

Be warned its backwards to most of what many of us believe (as most good things are IMO). Like support groups tells you you can;t do it alone. Like saying alcoholism is a disease takes the reponsibility off of you and gives you an excuse. Calling it an addiction makes it worse. At 12 step programs if you say "I became a non-drinker and I will never drink again" they will tell you you are in denial.. Doesn't sound like its much help IMO

So if those things ruffle your sensitivities, don't bother reading. If you're open minded and serious about stopping smoking I think it can do wonders.

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I can tell you that the nicotine is out of your body in 100 hours or less. What you are experiencing is the mental addiction. The mental addiction is cause by triggers such as a beer goes with a smoke, or a place and time that you always smoked.

The other part of the mental addiction is more universal in that the nicotine tricks you brain into expecting nicotine.

Some people can get over it without help. Many substitute something else like food or another vice to pacify themselves. The simple fact that every person who has quit for more than 150 hours and started smoking again, simply did so because of the mental addiction.

The mental addiction is rooted in the subconscious and only the people that can deal with it there will rid themselves of it. Some can do it on their own if they know how, others go to seek professional help. The rest just continue to pacify the urge somehow. The people who seek professional help often do so only as a last resort. They have quit many times but went back. Other do so because the pacifier is having a negative effect such as overeating and is making them fat.

Seeking professional help in breaking the mental addiction weeks after giving up smoking is getting more and more common. I am starting to see this quite regularly.

If you can remember the last time you smoked, or are counting the time from your last smoke, then you are still mentally addicted. A person who has broken the addiction when asked how long it has been will need to put some effort in to remembering when. Much like when was the last time you cut your hair. It takes a while for most people to figure out when their hair was cut last unless it was within a week or so. So when was the last time you smoked?

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Nice post. Have to agree. The book talks about alot of that too... When you become a non-smoker it doesn't matter when your last one was.

You can also get into some psyc stuff with 'the shaming cycle' and failing... We often do things to shame ourselves... I could see quitting (and starting again) fitting into that.

Like I said... all espects of health will play a factor I think.

The highest % of people who quit (If memeory serves) are those that just decide to. Its very largely mental.

John-does hypnotism work with some? An area that scares and interests me.

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Thanks for support and replies people. Yeah I disagree with that quote, because the first 2 weeks I didnt really have any cravings, well it was kinda like I quit for 2 weeks, then went to a rave and smoked 10 which is a lot for me as I used to only smoke 5-10 a day. After the rave I had no cravings to smoke at all for a fortnight then every now and again I get that feeling in my lungs, like an itch that needs scratching. Im ashamed to admit it but I made a small roll up last night. I was in heaven again hehe :o

Todays been okay....

i smoked 40-50 roll ups a day (golden virgina ) for over 30 years then about 15 years ago i gave them up, i remember holding this ash tray with about 10 stale stumps and ash in it and saying to myself "these cigs are going to kill you "the best thing i ever done,i coughed up dirty black flem for the first couple of months but once i was over the worst ( the first 6 months) i had beaten them, i was very surprised how easy it was.

what helped me (SO MUCH) i was doing the rounds in pattaya at the time and i would see so many of the girls had gerdums ( i think the thai call them) same as the vic inhalers so i bought one and every time i wanted to have my routine smoke,instead would have a sniff of my inhaler.

15 years on i still carry my gerdum in my pocket sometimes going weeks without knowing its there,but i know while ive got the inhaler im safe from going back on that terrible habit

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Nice post. Have to agree. The book talks about alot of that too... When you become a non-smoker it doesn't matter when your last one was.

You can also get into some psyc stuff with 'the shaming cycle' and failing... We often do things to shame ourselves... I could see quitting (and starting again) fitting into that.

Like I said... all espects of health will play a factor I think.

The highest % of people who quit (If memeory serves) are those that just decide to. Its very largely mental.

John-does hypnotism work with some? An area that scares and interests me.

Well I actually must take care in that I don’t want the mons to think I am doing self advertizement, I tend to stay away from the smoking forum for that reason.

However in general terms, hypnosis is often the last resort for smokers. I don’t take everyone that calls me ether. I evaluate how bad they want to quit. I ask them on a scale of 1 to 10, if they come back with a number too low I will turn them down. Because of that I personally have a 100% success rate. I can’t speak for other hypnotherapists because each runs their own practice they way they want. I prefer they not waste their money on hypnotherapy if they don’t want to quit.

As for the mental addiction, about 3 years ago I and other hypnotherapist started getting calls from people who had quit smoking but were still suffering with the mental addiction. The reason for the sudden calls was there was finally some positive press on hypnosis and not some skeptical journalist writing. People tend to trust what they hear on network news programs. Another factor is hypnotherapy in the states is now getting to be more mainstream with insurance covering several things. So I set up a program that deals with the mental addiction directly. Once the mental addiction is out of their head it is truly over for them. Again each hypnotherapist runs their own practice the way that they want. Some may offer it and other not.

There is no need to fear hypnosis. Most people experience some form of hypnosis at least twice a day. So truly there is no need to fear your own mind. But do your own research, don’t just trust my word. Just be sure that what you read was written by a professional in the hypnosis field. Psychology is not hypnotherapy and so on. The methods are very different when dealing with the subconscious. Meaning just because someone has a degree in psychology, they are no expert in hypnotherapy. Its hard to say what driving is like from the passengers seat if you have never driven.

I hope this answers your question. If not contact me directly.

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Thanks!

I use to to be very wary and think that messing with the mind just isn't smart.

basically its a scary thought...

Of course we always fear what we don't know (hense the strong reactions to new thoughts).

More resently I have come across sources I trust that talk about it and one that does it.. So now I'm interested to learn more..

I think its relevent to the topic in more than one way. 1 its an option that some may choose to look into and 2 its evidence on how strong the mental is in creating physical cravings etc..

Thanks again..

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you don't have any idea on how your body works or about biochemical, or?

Nicotine disturbs your balanced system because it works like acetlycholine and your body is used to get it every day. So the point is not when the nicotine left the body complete. The point is how long does it need till your system is working without it the same perfect like with it again.

So an addiction can be both longer and shorter than the time a substance is in your body.

But of course that is not an argument against what you tell about the mental addiction it is an add to it.

Would say most of all is the mental addiction like you tell, but your biochemical explainations are wrong.

I can tell you that the nicotine is out of your body in 100 hours or less. What you are experiencing is the mental addiction. The mental addiction is cause by triggers such as a beer goes with a smoke, or a place and time that you always smoked.

The other part of the mental addiction is more universal in that the nicotine tricks you brain into expecting nicotine.

Some people can get over it without help. Many substitute something else like food or another vice to pacify themselves. The simple fact that every person who has quit for more than 150 hours and started smoking again, simply did so because of the mental addiction.

The mental addiction is rooted in the subconscious and only the people that can deal with it there will rid themselves of it. Some can do it on their own if they know how, others go to seek professional help. The rest just continue to pacify the urge somehow. The people who seek professional help often do so only as a last resort. They have quit many times but went back. Other do so because the pacifier is having a negative effect such as overeating and is making them fat.

Seeking professional help in breaking the mental addiction weeks after giving up smoking is getting more and more common. I am starting to see this quite regularly.

If you can remember the last time you smoked, or are counting the time from your last smoke, then you are still mentally addicted. A person who has broken the addiction when asked how long it has been will need to put some effort in to remembering when. Much like when was the last time you cut your hair. It takes a while for most people to figure out when their hair was cut last unless it was within a week or so. So when was the last time you smoked?

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And your professional credentials are????

Please tell that to the hundreds that I have helped stop smoking and they more than likely will laugh in your face.

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