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Chao Lao Beach

What Happens to The Ashes After a Buddhist Funneral ?

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Usually the whole immediate family return to the crematorium (at the Wat) the day after the funeral to retrieve the ashes, and coins (that had been placed in the mouth of the deceased prior to cremation). The family will have already decided upon the final resting place and will take the remains to their chosen location.

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It is depended on the decadent and family's wishes. For example, when my grandma passed away, children decided to take her ash to the Moon river where she lived close by and sprinkled the majority of it in the river, and the rest of it her children took it and kept it in their home.

Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect Thailand

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My recent MIL funeral, after the cremation, (3 days) the ashes were collected, a simple ceremony with the monks and the ashes were made into fireworks.

What a way to go!! Leave this planet with a big bang - I've told my wife I want the same when my numbers up.

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Sometimes the "ashes", which include a lot of bones and bits, are laid out on the ground in the form of a person and then "dressed" with favoured clothes, with money in the pockets, incense on all corners. Monks chant over them and then the deceased's friends take the clothes and the money and gold fillings or whatever they can find. It's far more macabre than that though and lasts a long time. The bones are later taken home and the spirit is chased on its way by fire crackers and hoisting of a totem image on a long pole so the wind helps its departure.. so the spirit doesn't stay around the home and haunt the family. Buddhism mixed with ancient animism.

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In the case of my wife's grandma, a couple of bone fragments were put to a ceremonial pot thingy to be placed in a shrine later. I reckon the rest was shoveled to a pile somewhere on temple grounds.

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Thanks for that info.

Very interesting and something many of we expats have to give some thought to and make decisions about.

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After my wife was cremated I went back the next morning for a dawn ceremony and I had to pick her bones out of the ashes and then wash them in holy water then place in a basket for another 2 days in the Temple to dry then another ceremony to place them in a large glass jar before placing in the temple wall.

It is a very final act and you have closure and you know the person is dead and gone.....not like in the west when you see a coffin slide thru a door.

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Edited by crocken
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It is depended on the decadent and family's wishes. For example, when my grandma passed away, children decided to take her ash to the Moon river where she lived close by and sprinkled the majority of it in the river, and the rest of it her children took it and kept it in their home. Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect Thailand

"The decadent"? Not all the deceased are decadent, some have led blameless lives, even in Pattaya, so they tell me.

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It is depended on the decadent and family's wishes. For example, when my grandma passed away, children decided to take her ash to the Moon river where she lived close by and sprinkled the majority of it in the river, and the rest of it her children took it and kept it in their home. Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect Thailand

"The decadent"? Not all the deceased are decadent, some have led blameless lives, even in Pattaya, so they tell me.

My English is not that good. I meant the people who died.

Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect Thailand

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So it is "ok" to break them up, leave some temple and take some "home".

It is likely we will end up abroad to give the kids a good education, I would like to take something for a kind of memorial there as well.

In the mean time, would they have to "live" in a ghost house to avoid his ghost form scaring his sister ?

I don't want to make problems !

Although it is at first thought a bit essentric, I love the diamond idea above.

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When my MIL died, the next day the relatives returned to the crematorium to take what ashes and bone fragments they wanted, and each placed them in a small urn that they brought. There apparently are a number of kilos of remains - I'm not sure what happens to the rest. After several years my wife will spread what she saved into the sea, as she did with her father's and brother's remains. She put them in a small gold colored dish, placed flowers on top, and then we went out in a boat, and she gently let them slide into the sea. I could see the bones and ash sink into the water, but the flowers floated on top. Quite a nice effect, but she could't explain any significance of it...

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