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george

Mobile Congestion Chaos In Thailand

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forgot to mention

I have also noticed recently that the quality of audio has reduced to an almost intolerable level, it is difficult to talk to the other person even if you can get connected

how can the network phone operators be forced into fixing all theses issues, it's going to reach a stage where the mobile network is unusable .. what then ?

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OK, lots of rants and raves about the piss poor service but absolutely no concrete info regarding the causes of this current dilema nor any data regarding the time frame for any corrections.

Surely there must be some upset Thais too or is this another case of expatitis, where are are the voices of the masses and are they being heard?

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In a year from now people are gonna be like "GSM What?" This antiquated technology is maxed out at 2.5G.

Guys that work for Hutch know the skinny.

CDMA is the future. Sadly the Finns & The Swedish are gonna hold onto GSM for as long as possible.

Weird - I thought the Finns and Swedes (and the rest of the EU) had all installed UMTS (aka W-CDMA) already as their 3G system (which is based on a type of CDMA). In the UK anyway, you've got 3G networks living alongside the 2G networks.

Agreed - CDMA (in one brand or another) is the future, but GSM is fine for voice calls - so long as there are enough base stations for the number of phones, and the telecom providers have decent connections to their base stations, and between each other. (which are probably the bigger issues in Thailand).

(In some ways, GSM is better than CDMA as you get cheaper phones, because CDMA needs more processing power, and GSM is used virtually worldwide, meaning there's a bigger market for it.)

I do wish everyone had agreed on which type of 3G to use. Then we could have phones that work everywhere. - But you have CDMA2000 (with extensions such as EVDO), which you have in the US, Thailand, Japan (KDDi) and some other countries, and W-CDMA, which you have in Europe, Japan (Vodafone I think), and some other countries.

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I have noticed that there have been network problems with my AIS phone for a while but the problem usually goes after a couple of minutes. But this week and particularly today I have been completely unable to "access the network" for bloody ages!!! :o

Sort it out you SLAGS!!!!!!!

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The network is probably jammed with all the calls the school kids make and all the text messaging they do when they are sitting next to each other.

I do notice that I rarely see a farang on a mobile. When I see Thai girls getting off BTS or Underground they all seem to be on the phone. I think it's the fear of being alone and a phone call makes that fear go away.

I have zero knowledge of the mobile phone networks in Thailand other than I have a mobile phone which works most of the time if I keep it charged.

Yes, I have an agenda and I'm pushin' it. It's called comedy, light relief, don't take life so seriously.

You should try it ?

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The network is probably jammed with all the calls the school kids make and all the text messaging they do when they are sitting next to each other.

I do notice that I rarely see a farang on a mobile. When I see Thai girls getting off BTS or Underground they all seem to be on the phone. I think it's the fear of being alone and a phone call makes that fear go away.

totally agree. as a lot of us know firsthand, thai girls can be seriously "kee ngao"! :o

just trying out a new emoticon!

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All I was getting for the first call in Bangkok from about 1700 hrs each day was a "network busy" signal....had to just let it redial and hope, sooner or later u get through....but u wouldnt want to be calling for a life of death situation in Bangkok just now.....

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Feel bad for the remote medics ........Im still qualified but not on call any more..

Co ordinating evacuations is near impossible. Drs ,Helicopter pilots,Boat captains are all on mobiles and there isnt any land lines available when some poor sod has smashed his bike on the side of the road or has had a heart attack trying to impress his mia noi :o .

We get less than a 1o min window to defib a patient in cardiac arrest.....6 mins trying to call for it :D

Unfourtunatly the familys/tourists just think we are slow to react but the truth is we cant get information to the relevant people.we have presence in Gulf ofThailand and west coast same problem in all areas.

Yes we have explained to the phone operators how critical this is even pushing for "special treatment" ....Guess what we where offered 400bht of FREE CAlLS

still will come in handy to eventually tell the relatives that there beloved died trying to phone for help....

Ill end there before it turns to a rant.... :D

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DTAC has been acting funny for me lately, sometimes when my girlfriend calls, its her voive, but a different number shows up on the screen..like the lines are being crossed...

I have a similar problem. This girl keeps calling me, she's not my girlfriend, and I don't recognise the number, but she says she knows me. Strange - must be a problem with the networks.

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Mobile users normally don’t check how much was charged on their phone bills, all pays upon request. How much these phone companies make their extras by adding additional 10 Baht per subscribers?

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Update:

Call traffic worsens as tariffs bottom out

AIS network fails after truck accident

BANGKOK: -- Mobile-phone congestion problems will persist unless operators stop their price wars and the National Telecommunications Commission (NTC) enforces the new interconnection-charge regulations, according to industry experts.

Consumer frustrations at local operators increased yesterday as customers of mobile leader Advanced Info Service were left without service yesterday morning in parts of Bangkok due to a network collapse.

The company said the problem occurred after a lorry had crashed into one of the firm's transmission points.

Network congestion has jumped sharply as a mobile phone price war has broken out as operators look to boost their customer base ahead of the introduction of interconnection charges.

Call traffic this month has risen 300% to 400% as lower tariffs which had encouraged consumers to make more and longer calls than normal.

Even though the three major operators, AIS, DTAC and True Move, have been expanding their cross-network links since late last month, network problems continue due to slow progress in equipment upgrades and increased call traffic.

There are around 30 million mobile users in Thailand. Traffic among the different networks depends both on direct links between fixed-line and mobile operators, as well as through the TOT's interconnection gateway.

The three mobile operators entered a ''gentleman's agreement'' in early March to expand direct links with 750 E1 circuits each. The expansion work, at an estimated cost of 100 million baht, is expected to be completed within 90 days.

Each E1 circuit point can handle 30 cross-network calls simultaneously.

But AIS has installed only 30 E1 links with DTAC's direct gateways since mid-April.

Second-ranked DTAC said the slow progress in new network links by AIS was the main factor behind the current problems. The number of AIS customers making calls to other networks has risen by 30-40%.

But Wichien Mektrakarn, AIS executive vice-president for operations, said time was needed to complete the new links and upgrades.

He said AIS was installing an additional 101 E1 points linking with DTAC, while DTAC was adding 101 points to AIS gateways. Installation of the first set is to be completed by the end of this month, bringing the total cross-link capacity between AIS and DTAC to 720 points.

AIS and DTAC planned to add another 180 points each next month, with installation finished in July.

AIS now has 1,200 direct-link points connecting with DTAC, 378 with True Move, 1,800 with TOT and 218 with TT&T.

AIS plans to install another 255 points for outgoing traffic to True Move by July and another 25 outgoing points to TT&T.

DTAC has 1,202 direct points with AIS, 1,189 with True Move, 3,119 with TOT and 170 with Hutch.

He said mobile call connections should get better and would improve dramatically, but declined to offer guarantees that the expansion in interconnection links would be enough for future traffic growth.

--Bangkok Post 2006-05-18

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The problem with these idiots at AIS is that they continue to lie.... a lorry crashed into a transmission point. Yeah right ! :o

I'm still waiting for answers re. my GPRS email problems, 12 days after I asked first (5 emails, 2 calls)....nothing.

What an amateurs. Where is the government on this....oh wait...AIS = the government. Losers.

I want number portability. Now !

Update:

Call traffic worsens as tariffs bottom out

AIS network fails after truck accident

The company said the problem occurred after a lorry had crashed into one of the firm's transmission points.

--Bangkok Post 2006-05-18

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In a year from now people are gonna be like "GSM What?" This antiquated technology is maxed out at 2.5G.

Guys that work for Hutch know the skinny.

CDMA is the future. Sadly the Finns & The Swedish are gonna hold onto GSM for as long as possible.

Weird - I thought the Finns and Swedes (and the rest of the EU) had all installed UMTS (aka W-CDMA) already as their 3G system (which is based on a type of CDMA). In the UK anyway, you've got 3G networks living alongside the 2G networks.

Agreed - CDMA (in one brand or another) is the future, but GSM is fine for voice calls - so long as there are enough base stations for the number of phones, and the telecom providers have decent connections to their base stations, and between each other. (which are probably the bigger issues in Thailand).

(In some ways, GSM is better than CDMA as you get cheaper phones, because CDMA needs more processing power, and GSM is used virtually worldwide, meaning there's a bigger market for it.)

I do wish everyone had agreed on which type of 3G to use. Then we could have phones that work everywhere. - But you have CDMA2000 (with extensions such as EVDO), which you have in the US, Thailand, Japan (KDDi) and some other countries, and W-CDMA, which you have in Europe, Japan (Vodafone I think), and some other countries.

Indeed the reason why CDMA wasn't popular in the rest of the world is the level of royalties that Qualcomm (the owner of CDMA patents) wanted to build handsets and network infrastructure. The GSM charging structure is much more simple and fair.

Quite simply its impossible to build a CDMA network and handset anywhere near as cheaply and cost effectively as a GSM network......hence GSMs' popularity around the world

This is also the reason for all the differant 3G CDMA specifications. China for instance came up with its own version to avoid paying royalties to Qualcomm.....other countries probably did the same.

Probably down to politics in the end, no one wants there mobile network systems to be owned by the US :o:D

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Update:

Cell-phone users fuming: survey

BANGKOK: -- Most cell-phone users experience difficulty making successful calls and are angry about sub-standard service, claims an Abac Poll Research Centre survey released yesterday.

The survey covered 1,404 Bangkok cell-phone users - 468 users each of Advanced Info Service (AIS), Total Access Communication (DTAC) and True Move.

Conducted last Tuesday to Saturday, the survey gauged cell-phone users' experience of their service and their feelings about that amid the ongoing operator price wars.

Dr Noppadol Kannikar heads the research centre and yesterday said that more than 80 per cent of respondents had had difficulty making calls over the past 15 days.

The respondents said the difficulties were mainly experienced between 6pm and 9pm, although problems were detected at other periods, notably noon to 6pm.

According to the survey, while most phone calls were business or social, others made from cell phones were urgent, including emergencies and threats against life and property.

"Up to 77.6 per cent [of respondents] believe it is unfair that service quality is poor. The findings should prompt operators to urgently tackle these problems," Noppadol said.

More than 81 per cent complained that service providers had taken no responsibility for the erratic service.

--The Nation 2006-05-22

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