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Tywais

Smoke, Smog, Dust 2014 Chiang Mai

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Visibility took a big drop today and is under ten miles up here in Mae Taeng. A haze is hanging over the valley. Not much burning up in the hills yet but the forest is drying out quickly with the warmer weather.

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It's the same in the city. Air quality and visibility are going south, which is also reflected by the current measurements, as well as by the finest instrument of them all, my nose. I guess we can call this the official burning season opening.

Cheers, CM-Expat

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My view over Doi Suthep was pretty poor today, seeing a lot of small dust particles on my newly valeted truck already!! It certainly was not great today and evne ended up in a bout of sneezing!

Time to head South for a bit.

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There is a good PDF document that explains the situation: www.ec.oita-u.ac.jp/isf2011/pdf/proceedings-93-103.pdf

According to the document, mountainous terrain make the use of machines (to make fertilizers) difficult. Any ideas?

From what I am reading, the use of corn is in reaction to a demand and a need. "Corn is important in Asia as a livestock feed and a staple food, as well as a raw material for starches and sugars used in food processing and other industries." (http://www.agnet.org/library.php?func=view&style=type&id=20110725095646)

We need solutions. We know that there is a problem

Composting? Ploughing under? I notice that the average rice production per rai here is half of what other countries yield, yet no one seems interested in changing methods...

Half? Interesting! Do you have any references for this?

I wonder about the variables, of course, as you do, such as the topographical profile of the landscape and the size of holdings. Those do make a big difference!

Small paddy agriculture, many in less favorable topography as opposed to larger holdings, seems to relate to the relative cost of inputs, such a fertilizer, mechanization, and so on. Do you have any thoughts or information on that?

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From my Condo on Suthep Rd I could see the hills the other side of the Vally at Doi Saket at 18.00 hrs today.

When I went through Wing 41 this morning I saw the Aircraft that they use for cloud seeding, normally used to make rain.

I do wonder if these aircraft have been doing 'something' to keep away what would normally be our bad Smog, usually well set in by this time of the year.

john

Booked my trip down south anyway.

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There is a good PDF document that explains the situation: www.ec.oita-u.ac.jp/isf2011/pdf/proceedings-93-103.pdf

According to the document, mountainous terrain make the use of machines (to make fertilizers) difficult. Any ideas?

From what I am reading, the use of corn is in reaction to a demand and a need. "Corn is important in Asia as a livestock feed and a staple food, as well as a raw material for starches and sugars used in food processing and other industries." (http://www.agnet.org/library.php?func=view&style=type&id=20110725095646)

We need solutions. We know that there is a problem

Composting? Ploughing under? I notice that the average rice production per rai here is half of what other countries yield, yet no one seems interested in changing methods...

Half? Interesting! Do you have any references for this?

I wonder about the variables, of course, as you do, such as the topographical profile of the landscape and the size of holdings. Those do make a big difference!

Small paddy agriculture, many in less favorable topography as opposed to larger holdings, seems to relate to the relative cost of inputs, such a fertilizer, mechanization, and so on. Do you have any thoughts or information on that?

No I have no references for you. We use lots of compost and buffalo dung on our 1 rai home organic rice paddy, and also use a different method of transplanting to get roughly double the typical Thai farmer yield. No one except other farangs is interested in learning about it....

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There is a good PDF document that explains the situation: www.ec.oita-u.ac.jp/isf2011/pdf/proceedings-93-103.pdf

According to the document, mountainous terrain make the use of machines (to make fertilizers) difficult. Any ideas?

From what I am reading, the use of corn is in reaction to a demand and a need. "Corn is important in Asia as a livestock feed and a staple food, as well as a raw material for starches and sugars used in food processing and other industries." (http://www.agnet.org/library.php?func=view&style=type&id=20110725095646)

We need solutions. We know that there is a problem

Composting? Ploughing under? I notice that the average rice production per rai here is half of what other countries yield, yet no one seems interested in changing methods...

Half? Interesting! Do you have any references for this?

I wonder about the variables, of course, as you do, such as the topographical profile of the landscape and the size of holdings. Those do make a big difference!

Small paddy agriculture, many in less favorable topography as opposed to larger holdings, seems to relate to the relative cost of inputs, such a fertilizer, mechanization, and so on. Do you have any thoughts or information on that?

A discussion of rice yields here.

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/679239-rice-yield-per-rai/?hl=+rice%20+yield

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If you stay in town and spend most of your time in-doors it should not bother you much. I work indoors most of my day though go out for golf or other activities occasionally. The smoke is worst at sunrise. Then during the day thermal drafts cause the smoke to rise (I usually golf in the afternoon and have never been bothered). In March I cannot see Doi Suthep most days in the early AM from town, though by late afternoon at least a rough outline is usually visible.

The farmers in the hills have it worst.

SInce it only lasts about 2 months and I don't have emphysema or other breathing problems it does not concern me much. I figure hundreds of millions of Chinese have it far worse year round and it hasn't killed them yet.

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Well, today was interesting.. Did you all notice the weather/wind change this afternoon? This could be the end of the cool times, and into the hazy times.

It's interesting how this change of wind direction brought on significantly hazy weather, instantly.

It's not like there were suddenly fires in the immediate area; it's a weather change that brings on the crap. Will be looking at the weather map at the TMD site, but it's possible (likely?) that the hazy times kick off today.

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06.40 this morning and I can only see a couple of Kilos from my Condo compared with a view across town to the Doi Saket 'mountains' only two days ago.

john

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yup it's game on today.

Home Pro has a good deal on 3M Fiiltrete. 2 packs tapde together for 229 baht.

I looked at the price at Big C and it seemed a lot more expensive. 299 for one pack. Not sure if the packs were equal amounts of paper.

At Home pro its in one of the center isles toward the rear of the store.

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We have been surprised that there has been no burning up in the hills yet, but that all changed tonight. Several long string-of-pearls of fire up in the hills where the locals either drag a flaming log behind a motorcycle or walk and light the brush with a torch. I think this signals the official start of the smokey season. Photo from a few minutes ago.

post-498-0-12593300-1392987505_thumb.jpg

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Latest screen shot of the firemap for Feb. 21 shows a significant change in fire density over the last snapshot I posted. Also noticed the haze as I was driving up Suthep road to CMU.

post-566-0-74737000-1392988426_thumb.jpg

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Latest screen shot of the firemap for Feb. 21 shows a significant change in fire density over the last snapshot I posted. Also noticed the haze as I was driving up Suthep road to CMU.

attachicon.gifCapture.JPG

Queue up the Jaws music.....

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Latest screen shot of the firemap for Feb. 21 shows a significant change in fire density over the last snapshot I posted. Also noticed the haze as I was driving up Suthep road to CMU.

attachicon.gifCapture.JPG

Time to escape...

lNT4YxS.jpg

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