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Retire to Chiang Rai compared to Chiang Mai ?


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Stevo52 ,you must have spent most of your time in C.M around Loi Kroy road and such areas . .The bar girls there are looking for money ,because most are Hookers ,and thats what Hookers do .There is far more to C.M.than that though.

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Here are a few of the things that I enjoy about Chiang Rai....I suppose you could find some of these in CM but there is something about the small town feel that makes CR more special in my eyes. I oft

I was living in Chiang Mai for 2 years and I am living now in Chiang Rai. I am not into bars and tourist environment, and I think that busy traffic and markets are OK just for a week end... or for a

Clearly those of us who live here, have made our declaration for Chiang Rai over Chiang Mai. Far more people have chosen Chiang Mai, however, and one could argue as to why that is, but I view that as

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Another great reason to be in Chiang Rai is that we have far better quality earthquakes.

To date ours, here has lasted over twenty-four hours.

As well as this, and especially if you like BBC News you will come to know that Chiang Rai actually doesn't exist so, in effect, you will be living "nowhere"

Great if you need yo be incognito.

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Another great reason to be in Chiang Rai is that we have far better quality earthquakes.

To date ours, here has lasted over twenty-four hours.

As well as this, and especially if you like BBC News you will come to know that Chiang Rai actually doesn't exist so, in effect, you will be living "nowhere"

Great if you need yo be incognito.

Forget going to Loy Kroy, Chiangrai comes with an inbuilt big vibrator.

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Having travelled a fair bit around Thailand i don't think the cost of living actually varies that much (with the big exception of houses/condos). Most of the big things we buy gas/petrol, electricity, insurance, internet, UBC, electrical goods are the same where ever you live. Beer and food might vary a little but by only a few baht. The main decision on where to live should be do you like the place.

I've visted Chiang Rai and it was a nice place but far too quiet for me. Maybe some people like that. You can have a quiet life just as easily within a few miles of any of the big cities so why live in the sticks?

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First of all living someplace with all your toys and amenities is very different from just visiting. From my experience of living 30 years in Bangkok and seven years in Chiangrai I wouldn't want to live someplace in between.

Living in the suburbs of a big city is not the same as living in the countryside. You end up with neither the beauty of the countryside nor the convenience of the city.

Sent from my iPhone.

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I liked Chiang Mai a lot.

The restaurants ensure survival for a westerner, and, there is a tiny hippie section across from the main hooker bar strip and night bazaar area where the best organic foods are offered. I dont recall the name of the place but there is a small breakfast lunch shop owned by a family, where the very happy young hippie cooks the food and her brother makes the wheat grass and other juices, which I need to live on.

There was also a music scene there, which I was starting to get excited about

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When I did real estate in C.Rai, the following scenario played over and over:

I'd meet a farang with a Thai g.f. or wife. I'd show them nice rural properties. More often than not, he would like what was shown, whereas the Thai woman would stay quiet. Next morning, I'd connect with the farang, and here's how the conversation would go:

"Well, I must admit, some of those properties looked mighty good, but I had a talk with the wife, and we've decided to get something in Chiang Mai."

Translation: The wife most likely came from a rural background, quite possibly Issan rice farming. To her, getting a rural place with trees and views is a step backwards, towards. Now whe's got her sugar daddy, who can go to an ATM any time and pull out 20,000 baht easy as pie. She wants to go to a bigger city, WHERE THERE'S MORE SHOPPING!

Husband follows what the wife wants, 100% of the time. (gotta keep the lil' lady happy, don't we?).

So the husband will put up with gridlocked traffic, smog, no parks, less friendly locals, and all the rest that a big city offers, ....in order to please the wife. Oh, and real estate prices are higher in a bigger city. Values have nothing to do with quality of life, and everything to do with location. In Thailand, the bigger the city, the higher the r.e. values. Same: The bigger the highway your house is on, the higher the valuation. Same for flatland (in a rice growing culture) has higher value than hills.

In sum: Though a middle aged farang man might want rural property, with lawns and trees, with some hills around, and away from busy streets, and low cost. He's going to adapt to flat land, with neighbors within meters, few big trees, gridlock, smog, added noise, minimal views, .....because Thai wife wants to be where there are more shopping venues.

no longer doing real estate on chiang rai?

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Hi Alan,

I’ve lived in Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai, and really there is no significant difference re prices – you can live expensively or cheaply in both.

But Chiang Mai gives you so much more choice in just about every area of farang-oriented services, including accommodation, medical services and entertainment.

Your point that CR may have a more Thai-culture feel is interesting: certainly Chiang Mai has a much larger number of farang tourists and resident ex-pats, both in absolute terms and pro-rata, and sometimes in CM it’s hard to feel you’re in Thailand at all.

If you’re single, or in a partnership with a farang (and assuming neither of you speaks Thai), then CM would possible be the best bet, certainly it offers more convenience, but as others have said, the only way to know is to check it out for yourself.

I don’t know how much time you’ve spent in Thailand, but outside of the main tourist towns/areas, there is a very significant language barrier if you don’t speak Thai (or don’t have a partner who does). Why not check out the Philippines too J

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Not sure about the Phil's recommendation.

I have travelled and worked in almost all SEAsian countries and one thing which can most certainly t be said for Thailand, with some coastal exceptions, is that I have always felt totally safe here. Even on deserted streets on the dead of night, I gave never experienced that feeling that someone, is hiding in the next shop doorway, behind a tree or a parked car.

In Manila, for some reason, I was always uncomfortable. In hindsight, probably undeservedly, but uncomfortable enough to resist going out during the dark hours unless absolutely necessary

As this contributor offered, there is very little to separate the cities. Rent a cheap apartment and a motorcycle and try each one for a few months. Just days won't give you the insight you need to be able to plant roots.

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Not sure about the Phil's recommendation.

I have travelled and worked in almost all SEAsian countries and one thing which can most certainly t be said for Thailand, with some coastal exceptions, is that I have always felt totally safe here. Even on deserted streets on the dead of night, I gave never experienced that feeling that someone, is hiding in the next shop doorway, behind a tree or a parked car.

In Manila, for some reason, I was always uncomfortable. In hindsight, probably undeservedly, but uncomfortable enough to resist going out during the dark hours unless absolutely necessary

As this contributor offered, there is very little to separate the cities. Rent a cheap apartment and a motorcycle and try each one for a few months. Just days won't give you the insight you need to be able to plant roots.

I agree, Phils wasn't intended as a recommendation, but merely as an option to consider for people who may prefer or need an English speaking environment, though I would say that Manila is not representative of Phils. Also, given the enduring effects of the earthquake here, and the political instability I am certain thay many expats have revised their risk assessment recently.

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