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Sojuncoke

Where can I get good Chinese food? How come Chinese food in Thailand is not good as other countries?

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Has the OP actually ever eaten real Chinese food in China? If so, he/she would know that it's a very big country with greatly varying regional cuisines.

The "Chinese food" available in USA and Europe is often not very Chinese, although I know a few great restaurants in San Francisco's Chinatown. Personally I find the Chinese food in BKK's Chinatown excellent.

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... and you have said it in one.

You want a style of cuisine that the Fast Food companies made popular ... facepalm.gif

If you want 'real' Chinese food .. go to China.

... but you probably have never done that ... rolleyes.gif

No the first two dishes ARE NOT fast food cuisine. I guess you never been to a real Chinese restaurant that serves those dishes.

Lived in Singapore (Chinese majority) for 14 years and have been to China many times. I've never once seen a 'sauce dish' placed beside fried rice on the same plate except on rare occasions when the food is placed together in a styrofoam container for take-away. In fact, in most places, you will get separate containers for the rice and the 'main' so as not to make the rice soggy. The Chinese are very particular about the texture of their rice...

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One thing to note... The most common Chinese food in North America is Cantonese (Hong Kong based) and is quite distinctive. Szechuan, which is much spicier, has become quite popular in recent years also. The largest immigrant group to North America were the Cantonese, which is why North Americans equate Cantonese food with Chinese food. Mainlanders today find this amusing. The Chinese group that immigrated to Singapore in the largest numbers were the Hokkien (from Fujian in China), and their food was much influenced by spicier Malay food. Thailand (Bangkok), however, mostly received Teochews (from a different part of Fujian); their food is somewhat different from Cantonese and Hokkien. I believe they're best known for congees/porridges. My Singaporean friends tend not to be impressed with Teochew food. But perhaps the 'Chinese food' you're not liking so much is Teochew rather than the Cantonese food you're used to.

Also remember that a lot of Chinese foods in the US are 'fake'. When I moved to Singapore many years ago, I was looking forward to getting some 'real' General Tao's Chicken. It was only then that I discovered that it was 'invented' in New York City. smile.png

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You can find real Chinese food at the real Chinese restaurants in Thailand – however, some of them are quite expensive. tongue.png

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... and you have said it in one.

You want a style of cuisine that the Fast Food companies made popular ... facepalm.gif

If you want 'real' Chinese food .. go to China.

... but you probably have never done that ... rolleyes.gif

No the first two dishes ARE NOT fast food cuisine. I guess you never been to a real Chinese restaurant that serves those dishes.

Like a REAL chinese restaurant in THAILAND, as judged by YOU, you mean ?

Define a REAL Chinese restaurant first, mr "Expert on Chinese food".

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I don't regard Chinese food to be great in other countries as you suggest. I guess it depends where you live that reflects the style and taste, the ingredients used etc. It's the same as why doesn't Thai food taste as good in other countries as it does in Thailand? With regard to your Chinese food, in Thailand you will get the Thai version, just like in America or other western countries you get the Western version. If you want the real food you either have to go to the country of origin or ensure that the ingredients used are the original ingredients from that country.

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The best Chinese and Indian food is in the UK.

Agreed - and cheap too. I despair of finding a good Indian restaurant in Pattaya. Never try Neeroy's which bills itself English style Indian curries. They'd get petrol bombed in Manchester or Burnley.

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I don't regard Chinese food to be great in other countries as you suggest. I guess it depends where you live that reflects the style and taste, the ingredients used etc. It's the same as why doesn't Thai food taste as good in other countries as it does in Thailand? With regard to your Chinese food, in Thailand you will get the Thai version, just like in America or other western countries you get the Western version. If you want the real food you either have to go to the country of origin or ensure that the ingredients used are the original ingredients from that country.

That's wrong. Real Chinese food is available in some major U.S. cities if that's what you're looking for. There are even huge Asian markets filled with authentic ingredients where you can cook your own. SO MUCH better than Thailand, it isn't even funny.

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The Chinese are very particular about the texture of their rice...

I'm surprised they can taste anything with their levels of pollution.

Do dishes come with a sprinkling of coal dust?

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One thing to note... The most common Chinese food in North America is Cantonese (Hong Kong based) and is quite distinctive. Szechuan, which is much spicier, has become quite popular in recent years also. The largest immigrant group to North America were the Cantonese, which is why North Americans equate Cantonese food with Chinese food. Mainlanders today find this amusing. The Chinese group that immigrated to Singapore in the largest numbers were the Hokkien (from Fujian in China), and their food was much influenced by spicier Malay food. Thailand (Bangkok), however, mostly received Teochews (from a different part of Fujian); their food is somewhat different from Cantonese and Hokkien. I believe they're best known for congees/porridges. My Singaporean friends tend not to be impressed with Teochew food. But perhaps the 'Chinese food' you're not liking so much is Teochew rather than the Cantonese food you're used to.

Also remember that a lot of Chinese foods in the US are 'fake'. When I moved to Singapore many years ago, I was looking forward to getting some 'real' General Tao's Chicken. It was only then that I discovered that it was 'invented' in New York City. smile.png

Teochew ppl don't come from fukkien. They come from guangdong province even though the language is rather similar to fukkinese aka hokkien.

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Actually, the food you see in farang Chinese Restaurants is not the same as what is typically served in China. My mom ended up in the emergency room for 2 weeks there. So you see, the Chinese food being sold to tourists in all these other countries is geared towards "Western" taste. Most people would not be able to handle "real" chinese food.

Good points,

The Chinese restaurants in Thailand serving Cantonese Chinese tourists serve authentic Cantonese food and mostly do so at outrageous tourist prices. If one thinks farangs sometimes get overcharged in Thailand see first what the Chinese get charged. Really good reasonably priced authentic tasting Cantonese food is not as easy to find as one would think. In USA, Canada, Austrailia, UK where there is a large Cantonese diaspora it can be much easier to find.

The Chinese diaspora in Thailand largely originates from Guangdong province so we have plenty of their Teochew cuisine here. If anyone would like to browse: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teochew_cuisine it is interesting to see how many common and popular Thai dishes are not Thai at all. They are Teochew food.

I would prefer more Cantonese and Hakka dishes, and have resorted to preparing some of them myself. It helps if one knows what the real deal should taste, look, and feel like. It also helps to overcome the typical "Thailand NO have"! frequently stated by shopkeepers when I'm trying to source ingredients like Hoisin sauce. I resorted to making my own Hoisin sauce as well.

Please do have a look at the wiki link above, almost all the dishes listed are very common in Thailand. I was surprised how many.

Agree with the other posters who mention superior Chinese food in Vietnam, Cambodia, Singapore,.. even Malaysia. In south Vietnam most of the Chinese speak Cantonese.

Cheers,

The egg oyster omelete is good. We call it or luak.

Kway tiao is good too.

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You can get good Chinese food everywhere in Thailand.

It's sometimes tricky to find it in some provinces because you may not recognize it for what it is. Outside of Chinese-tourist areas all the dishes have been renamed and flavoured to the Thai taste. Ask for a menu in Chinese if you have a friend who can read it.

When searching out Chinese food it helps to specify which regional varieties you want. Thailand has Teochew, Hokkien, Hainanese, Cantonese, and Hakka. Chinese food is definitely here.

The noodle dish in the OP is Ranna Mee Leung Gop. The shrimp and lobster dish is also Ranna served with rice. Although in Thailand these dishes will probably taste different from their counterparts in Hong Kong or Guangzhao because they have been adapted to the Thai taste, just like American Chinese food has been adapted to the U.S. taste. That might be why you think Chinese food in Thailand isn't as good as what you were expecting.

In Bangkok get off the rapid transit at Hualompong and wander the sois and main streets at night. There is lot's of really unique Chinese food around there ranging in price from 50 baht to 5000 baht per bowl (shark fin soup). A very short taxi ride away is the neighbouring area of Pahurat (India town) likewise there are many authentic Indian restaurants big and small serving mostly to the Thai Indian community.

Try they following searches in your favourite search engine:

"dim sum" site:nationmultimedia.com

"dim sum" +bangkok site:nationmultimedia.com

Use your imagination and replace site:nationmultimedia.com with other possible sites, It's not allowed to post links to The Bangkok Post, or other forums like Trip Advisor on TV, but you can figure that out for yourself.

Good luck, and happy eating. I love Chinese food too.

ps. If you ever go south of the border you'll find a fantastic world of Chinese food in Malaysia!

You will also find some really good Chinese food south of the border in Mexico. thumbsup.gif

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Well while we on the subject,

I once was craving a good Chinky in Patong (tried the one in Paradise Hotel few years back and was not impressed by food nor service and was not that cheap (mains came before rice which came 10 mins after???) asked the GF if she knew any good Chinese restaurants? yes she said... We set out on my quest, she took me to some Sushi bar lol...? Then had a cruise around on my bike with her, looked all over then found one place which advertised as Thai/European/Chinese, Thought that will do, at least they will have something. We sat down she looks at a menu in Thai, I look at a Farang menu, can't see any chinese dishes, I looks through the Thai menu (the usual pics etc) nope, nothing? I calls the Katoy weighter/ss over, you have Chinese food? Yes Sir, can I have menu please, yes sir... he/she comes back with another menu (Great I think, here we go, will order everything I'm starving!) I look at the menu, Its the same Frigging menu but all in Chinese? blink.png

Ha ha ha... love Thailand, but anyone know anywhere in Patong for a good Chinese (and if it matters I come from Manchester UK and we have the odd decent Chinese Gaff) So know will not be exactly same, just something similar I'd be happy smile.png

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One thing to note... The most common Chinese food in North America is Cantonese (Hong Kong based) and is quite distinctive. Szechuan, which is much spicier, has become quite popular in recent years also. The largest immigrant group to North America were the Cantonese, which is why North Americans equate Cantonese food with Chinese food. Mainlanders today find this amusing. The Chinese group that immigrated to Singapore in the largest numbers were the Hokkien (from Fujian in China), and their food was much influenced by spicier Malay food. Thailand (Bangkok), however, mostly received Teochews (from a different part of Fujian); their food is somewhat different from Cantonese and Hokkien. I believe they're best known for congees/porridges. My Singaporean friends tend not to be impressed with Teochew food. But perhaps the 'Chinese food' you're not liking so much is Teochew rather than the Cantonese food you're used to.

Also remember that a lot of Chinese foods in the US are 'fake'. When I moved to Singapore many years ago, I was looking forward to getting some 'real' General Tao's Chicken. It was only then that I discovered that it was 'invented' in New York City. smile.png

Teochew ppl don't come from fukkien. They come from guangdong province even though the language is rather similar to fukkinese aka hokkien.

Depends how you look at it. See here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teochew_people#History. For example, "studies of genetic analysis supported that although all Han Chinese are indeed related and share a common root, the Teochew had closest links with the Minnan area of Fujian province and those from the Taihang Mountain range of north-central China". And "They are known to Cantonese speakers as "Hoklo", literally meaning "men of Fujian"..."

My Teochew gf of 14 years always said that her people's roots were in Fujian. I wasn't going to argue with her about it.

Sent from my iPad using Thaivisa Connect Thailand

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