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BANGKOK 19 March 2019 13:21

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Durianwriter

Understanding Thai Addresses

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I wonder when they will also demand Latitude and Longitude details on all addresses.

This is BTW the best way to operate a GPS in Thailand! I always try to find the exact location in GoogleEarth. In Bangkok and other big cities, it is possible to use a POI (point of interest) nearby, like hotels.

Thais navigate by phone. They ask first for the region and call then for the last kilometres. The Thai address have no common system and even non-local Thais have a problem with it. That is also the reason why HomePro etc. always ask for a map...

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Every Thai village has both a name and a number. In some instances a large village (not necessarily a "tessabon tambon" or township) may cover two village numbers without having two distinct names. Townships start at 99 for a "village number" and run backwards from there, FYI.



The village number is the last two digits of the eight-digit geocode given by the Thai authorities. Geocode 43020201 for example is village 01 (Ban Nam Pong) of tambon 02 (Nam Mong) of amphur 02 (Tha Bo) of province 43 (Nong Khai).



The first four digits for province and amphur, "4302" in our example, also appear on the Thai ID card denoting the place where a person's birth was registered. Since it follows a person for life, this is why some people bring their newborns to Bangkok to have their birth registered at a family member's household in the capital. It avoids some discrimination later in life.



You're not going to find Google Maps or any other offshore service which is specific to the village level. They only started outlining the tambon boundaries.



Search in the right place and you can find coordinates for most villages. The grid system is somewhat obscure, and some entries are inaccurate.



When you see an address such as 12/34 M. 1, it's telling you that this is sub-lot 34 of lot 12 in village 1. The master lot numbers were originally assigned a long time ago, and in a relatively arbitrary way. To make things worse, if you subdivide and sell master lot 34, the newly created independent lot will not be 35, but instead the next available number in that village. This is why clusters of shophouses in Pattaya and elsewhere may run 52/1 to 52/20 with 237/1 to 237/50 following, then 126/1 next door to that.



A soi name and/or number following the 12/34 M. 1 designation is just a courtesy and has no real standing or importance outside of Bangkok. In Bangkok the tambon and amphur are now called kwaeng and khet respectively following a municipal reform many decades ago (although the old-timers may still refer to them as such). But the property deeds should still use this system even in Bangkok where the more familiar number-and-street system is in use.



And nothing in that precludes the owner or master tenant of a cluster of shophouses (some can span several blocks) of assigning their own non-legal building numbers to each designated shophouse which already has a sub-lot/lot Moo something address.


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If you would live on
1234/567 Moo 89
Tambol Nongprue, Amphur Banglamung
Chonburi 20150



1234/567 = house number, being the 1234th house in the zone 567 (i.e. housing estate/village/condominium)
Moo = best translated as hamlet
89 = hamlet number 89
Tambol = Village
Amphur = Municipality
Chonburi = district capital
20150 = Zip Code

Easy, isn't it? The challenge is to visit Khun Daeng living on 12/34 Moo 10 in Nongprue. Only way to find out is to ask where Moo 10 is and take it from there by asking around OR TO BE BORN AS A THAI POSTMAN!

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I live in Bangkok burbs and have a numbered street address along a highway frontage road. However, no numbers are displayed on the street or even block numbers at crossroads. Many Thais here use local landmarks as part of the address, like "near Big C."

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The number of the moo is assigned by the Land Office if I remember correctly. To decipher the you'll need a map from them, there's no logic. And they screw it up from time to time, f.ex. our house shares the address with another one miles away, it's a huge pain as lots of the post gets mixed up.

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I think the Moo's are much bigger than defined villages. Here in good old Nongprue I live in Moo1, used to live nearby in Moo 13, Walking Street is Moo 10. I did see a Moo Map in the Municipality office which should the whole of Nongprue subdivided into Moo's, I don't think there was anything over 13.

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Navigating the wilds of Thailand, I have learned to always be close to the address in late morning / early afternoon.

Find the nearest post office and ask them.

They know where everyone lives, which can have nothing I can figure out to do with the address I have been given.

Even slipped 100 baht to the motorcycle delivery driver and been taken right to the door.

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Crossy, on 27 Feb 2014 - 16:48, said:

I've yet to find any logic whatever to Thai addresses once you leave the realms of the (relatively) ordered cities.

Our whole village is 'moo 3' which is prefixed by a plot number, so we are '4 moo 3' followed by the sub-district name then the Tambon, the plot numbers follow no order I can see.

We are on a relatively major (4 digit) road but the road doesn't have a name so it doesn't figure in the address at all.

You stand no chance whatever of finding our place on a map from the address alone. At least putting the postcode into Google Maps gets you within a couple or five km, sadly there's a ruddy great river running right through the centre of the postcode region so you can easily be within 500m but have a 10km drive to get there.

What I found on house number, and this was in Kathu, the numbers were allocated as a house was built, this means that the numbers jump all over the place, this made it so hard for the postie he simple pops the mail in any mailbox then lets the house owners/tenants sort it out Give you an idea, 5 houses in a row, in our Soi, 35 37, 65, 23, 21.

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You all appear to be putting logic to something distinctly Thai. I really do not understand how you can do that!

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May sound boring, but there are quite extensive articles on the topic in the wiki.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subdivisions_of_Thailand (from the birds perspective: "Administrative divisions of Thailand")

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thai_addressing_system (Thai adressing system)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muban (muban, the village level)

English speakers will now be confused smile.png , as the articles (also) show the official transcripts for the subdivisions: changwat, amphoe, tambon, khet/khwaeng. mu(ban).

And not to forget: Pattaya is (as in other sense) a "special construction":

The city of Pattaya is a special municipal area which covers the whole tambon Nong Prue (Nongprue) and Na Kluea (Naklua) and parts of Huai Yai and Nong Pla Lai.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pattaya

"Pattaya" is not a necessary part of the postal adress btw.

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Basiclly everything was said.

A vaccant lot has no number. You just start building. The very moment the bathroom is completed you can apply for the house number. (Funny. Not so long time ago the houses in the villages didn't even have bathrooms. Business in the bushes.)

With this number you can apply for an electric meter and water supply.

The dash numbers (xxx/x) are a workaround. E. g. When the offspring builds a new house in the same moobaan as the parents they can use mama/papa's house number followed by /1, /2, /3......

Acctually I have two house numbers. Beside the real one an extra one for the electric company. We applied for the meter with mama's number plus /2 (#/1 is already in use by one of her daughters) to get electricity before the bathsrooms wer finished.

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I assume that every separate unit in a condo building has its own "dash" number ? (e.g. 223/12, 223/17 ...).

A friend lives in a condo building in Jomtien, adress starts like this, followed by the mu (moo) number.

The number after the dash does (of course smile.png ) not correspond to his "apartment number".

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What about UK where some houses have names, not numbers. It is not just Thailand!

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"Moo"s are municipal regons (villages or any certain area) for sure, not exactly for postal purposes.

the best way to know about "moo"s in a city/area, is having a local municipality map, and remomber, they're not in sequences always:

Name
Moo, Road
Tambon, Amphur
Province, Postal code

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From large area to small: Province (Jungwat), District (Amphoe), sub District (Tambol), Village (Hmuban), section (Hmu), lastly, ths plot number

Sent from my SM-T110 using Tapatalk

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