Jump to content
BANGKOK 21 April 2019 02:02
Sign in to follow this  
webfact

Thailand finds 200 'Turkish refugees' at secret camp

Recommended Posts

Thailand finds 200 'Turkish refugees' at secret camp

BANGKOK, March 13, 2014 (AFP) - Thai police have discovered about 200 suspected Turkish refugees at a secret camp in the kingdom's deep south, officials said Thursday, describing the case as "unprecedented".


Thailand has long been a hub for people trafficking, with thousands of Rohingya boat people from neighbouring Myanmar believed to have passed through the kingdom in recent years.

The 200 refugees, whom police said identified themselves as Turkish, were detained after a raid on a camp in a mountainous rubber plantation on Wednesday night in the southern province of Songkhla.

"It's an unprecedented case that there are so many Turkish people arrested here," Police Major General Thatchai Pitaneelaboot said by telephone.

"They came as families and looks like they wanted to go somewhere else because they kept their belongings ready to move," he said, adding that several suspected minders had fled during the raid.

It was unclear how they arrived in Thailand. Police were waiting for an interpreter to help question the detainees, who have not yet been charged with any crime.

The Turkish embassy said it had no information about their case while the UN refugee agency did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

In January Thailand detained more than 500 Rohingya refugees after a raid on a suspected people-trafficking camp in its deep south, a Muslim-dominated region plagued by a nearly decade-long insurgency.

Thousands of Rohingya, described by the United Nations as among the world's most persecuted minorities, have fled sectarian violence in western Myanmar in rickety boats since 2012, mostly believed to be heading for Malaysia.

Thailand said last year it was investigating allegations that some army officials in the kingdom were involved in the trafficking of Rohingya.

afplogo.jpg
-- (c) Copyright AFP 2014-03-13

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thailand said last year it was investigating allegations that some army?( Navy ) officials in the kingdom were involved in the trafficking of Rohingya.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ask the management of the famous and biggest Russian Touroperator -I think i am not allowed to name them- with the logo of a horse... They are actually turkish and must be able to help translations....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Turkish refugees fleeing to somewhere via Thailand? Highly unlikely. If the wanted to get say Western Europe, there are much easier ways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are "investigating" allegations of the army and navy involvement. And they had a Thai plantation owner that was identified red handed by the Reuters report. What happened to these investigations and Thai press coverage of this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are "investigating" allegations of the army and navy involvement. And they had a Thai plantation owner that was identified red handed by the Reuters report. What happened to these investigations and Thai press coverage of this?

Perhaps this is the sensational corruption conspiracy that the PDRC were going to reveal. Hang on, rubber plantation in the south, oh well, maybe not, a bit too close to home.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SONGKHLA
Unidentifiable group of Muslims nabbed

SANTIPARP RAMMASUT,
CHULARAT SAENGPASSA
THE NATION

30229183-01_big.jpg

BANGKOK: -- A GROUP of 220 reportedly Muslim immigrants, whose nationality and origin was not known to Thai authorities as of press time yesterday, have been arrested at a rubber plantation in the southern province of Songkhla.

The police are unable to communicate with the group, which consists of 82 children, 78 men and 60 women, as they speak a tongue that has yet to be identified by Thai immigration and authorities. A Turkish-speaking interpreter was called in to interview them because it was initially believed that the group might hail from Turkey. The detainees were moved to an immigration office in Hat Yai district, before the women and children were moved to a shelter.

The women in the group were wearing hijab, with a netted opening for the eyes, while the men were found wearing casual attire. An immigration police officer noted that the group was comprised mostly of families and carried luggage like the sort used by normal international travellers. He added that their clothes were still clean, which possibly indicated that they had only just arrived in Thailand. He also said that they appeared to be Chinese looking.

Reporters' also observed that the detainees were dressed in expensive-looking clothes and had sophisticated mobile devices.

"We are trying to check if they are Uighurs from China," said Sunai Phasuk, Thailand's representative for Human Rights Watch. Uighurs are a Muslim group from China’s Xinjiang province, whose language has Turkish roots.

Upon detaining the group, the authorities first provided them with food and water, along with medical assistance for those appearing unwell. Police initially thought they might be Rohingya boat people entering Thailand illegally from Myanmar.

Officials from the United Nations Head Commissioner on Refugees have been coordinating with the authorities to take care of the group, and have enlisted help from Arab speakers to try and communicate with the group. So far, no charges of illegal entry or criminal activities have been pressed on them.

A few men reportedly escaped when the police closed in on the group in response to an alert from local residents. No details were available about the escapees as of press time.

Immigration police commander Pol Maj-General Thawatchai Pitanilabutr, who led the inspection of the plantation, said several Rohingya were also being sheltered near the farm and police are checking to see if the two groups had anything in common in relation to their travel into Thailand.

Pol Lt-Colonel Paisith Sangkhahapong, director of the Department of Special Investigation anti-human trafficking centre, said the agency had not yet looked into the incident, hence it could not determine if it was related to a crime under its jurisdiction.

He said if the group hailed from Turkey, this would be the largest group of Turkish people travelling via Thailand. He went on to say that Thailand should not be a route for human trafficking from Turkey as there were other routes available via Europe.

nationlogo.jpg
-- The Nation 2014-03-14

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Turkish refugees fleeing to somewhere via Thailand? Highly unlikely. If the wanted to get say Western Europe, there are much easier ways.

I guess they would be heading to Australia.

It would be one of their worst options to try entry to Australia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PNG_solution

But if they get a stolen or fake passport and fly into Australia then they avoid the PNG thing.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They're on their way to Australia (just seen someone else has the same idea - sorry to repeat.)

Edited by Card

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thailand said last year it was investigating allegations that some army?( Navy ) officials in the kingdom were involved in the trafficking of Rohingya.

I'm shocked... and stunned!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...