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This could be the school's way of telling you to go away rather than an immigration decision. Just saying.......how many visible tattoos do you have; are you clean cut; do you own a pair of dress slacks, shoes, a tie and a dress shirt?

Peculiar way of telling a person to go away ...by offering him a job even without the permit.

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Not sure what your point is here.. I am English but i am not qualified to teach kids.

The way forward is go and take the TEFL course for teaching, it doesn't take long, it is quite easy to get a student visa to enroll and you will then have at least something to support you.

Until then i don't see that you can complain much to be brutally honest.

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I don't know if the OP is still reading this thread, but if he is, here are the current requirements for teaching legally in Thailand:

1. to get a Thai teaching license you need either a B.Ed, a M.Ed, a post-graduate Diploma in Education or a current teacher's license from your home country. If you don't have any of the above qualifications but do have a B.A. or B.S., you can take 4 tests offered by the TCT. Passing all 4 tests is almost impossible, as the TCT seem to have used google translate to produce the English version of at least one of them.

In addition to the above, a Thai Culture course must be attended.

2. You can get a waiver for a Thai teacher's license for two years or two schools, whichever comes first. You should have a University degree of some sort to get this waiver and should either take the Thai Culture Course or one of thr TCT tests before the end of your first year on a waiver in order to get the second waiver.

A TEFL course is not a requirement and has not been for several years. A post-graduate diploma in Education can be earned in one year and should, in addition to a B.A. or B.S. and the Thai Culture Course, get you a Teacher's License.

TIT and all of the above requirements could be changed tomorrow.

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I have been asked to teach at my local school and I have told them I wont start without work permit, licence etc...I have a non o visa being married to a thai but immigration told me I must have a B visa only to be able to work..can you work legally on a non o visa ???...I would love to know , some people say yes others say no...I don't have a degree but I have a TEFL certificate ....I could of started work yesterday but iam hanging fire to see if the school will sort out any thing for me.......ps there was also a lady from Camaroon who was having an interview for the 2nd job at the school and when I asked her about her visa status...she showed me her passport, her tourist visa ran out on sept 13 th last year...I told her she needs to leave the country and have 20000 bht overstay fine ready to pay....she thought I was joking....

You can get a Work Permit if you have O based on marriage.

I have found that many Labour Department offices are unaware of this.

We employ 3 teachers in exactly the same O situation as you.

Yes you can work if you have an O visa based on being married to a Thai citizen. Its more complicated than a retirement visa but has 2 distinct advantages - you are allowed to work and you only have to show income of 40,000 Baht per month

Edited by Jaggg88
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A TEFL course is not a requirement and has not been for several years. A post-graduate diploma in Education can be earned in one year and should, in addition to a B.A. or B.S. and the Thai Culture Course, get you a Teacher's License.

TIT and all of the above requirements could be changed tomorrow.

Hi...I have a BS degree and would be interested in teaching in Thailand. Am I correct in saying that I would only get the waiver for two years? From the above posts I understand that if I complete a diploma in education I could eventually get a teaching license. Working full-time, the only possibility for me to get a teaching diploma would be through distance learning (ie open university or like), would this be recognised in thailand?

thanks

marco

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^Yes, with a BS you can get 2 one year waivers. However, the TCT seems to be changing their requirements and it is difficult to say what will happen next year.

In addition to overseas online courses, some of the Ratchapats offer English Language courses and degrees (look up International Programs). As far as I know, these are only offered in BKK and Chiang Mai.

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I have been asked to teach at my local school and I have told them I wont start without work permit, licence etc...I have a non o visa being married to a thai but immigration told me I must have a B visa only to be able to work..can you work legally on a non o visa ???...I would love to know , some people say yes others say no...I don't have a degree but I have a TEFL certificate ....I could of started work yesterday but iam hanging fire to see if the school will sort out any thing for me.......ps there was also a lady from Camaroon who was having an interview for the 2nd job at the school and when I asked her about her visa status...she showed me her passport, her tourist visa ran out on sept 13 th last year...I told her she needs to leave the country and have 20000 bht overstay fine ready to pay....she thought I was joking....

You can get a Work Permit if you have O based on marriage.

I have found that many Labour Department offices are unaware of this.

We employ 3 teachers in exactly the same O situation as you.

Yes you can work if you have an O visa based on being married to a Thai citizen. Its more complicated than a retirement visa but has 2 distinct advantages - you are allowed to work and you only have to show income of 40,000 Baht per month

What's complicated about it? I have one and thought it was very simple.

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I have been asked to teach at my local school and I have told them I wont start without work permit, licence etc...I have a non o visa being married to a thai but immigration told me I must have a B visa only to be able to work..can you work legally on a non o visa ???...I would love to know , some people say yes others say no...I don't have a degree but I have a TEFL certificate ....I could of started work yesterday but iam hanging fire to see if the school will sort out any thing for me.......ps there was also a lady from Camaroon who was having an interview for the 2nd job at the school and when I asked her about her visa status...she showed me her passport, her tourist visa ran out on sept 13 th last year...I told her she needs to leave the country and have 20000 bht overstay fine ready to pay....she thought I was joking....

You can get a Work Permit if you have O based on marriage.

I have found that many Labour Department offices are unaware of this.

We employ 3 teachers in exactly the same O situation as you.

Yes you can work if you have an O visa based on being married to a Thai citizen. Its more complicated than a retirement visa but has 2 distinct advantages - you are allowed to work and you only have to show income of 40,000 Baht per month

What's complicated about it? I have one and thought it was simple. Even got grandfathered in with the only showing 200,000 a year

Edited by Neeranam
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I have been asked to teach at my local school and I have told them I wont start without work permit, licence etc...I have a non o visa being married to a thai but immigration told me I must have a B visa only to be able to work..can you work legally on a non o visa ???...I would love to know , some people say yes others say no...I don't have a degree but I have a TEFL certificate ....I could of started work yesterday but iam hanging fire to see if the school will sort out any thing for me.......ps there was also a lady from Camaroon who was having an interview for the 2nd job at the school and when I asked her about her visa status...she showed me her passport, her tourist visa ran out on sept 13 th last year...I told her she needs to leave the country and have 20000 bht overstay fine ready to pay....she thought I was joking....

You can get a Work Permit if you have O based on marriage.

I have found that many Labour Department offices are unaware of this.

We employ 3 teachers in exactly the same O situation as you.

Yes you can work if you have an O visa based on being married to a Thai citizen. Its more complicated than a retirement visa but has 2 distinct advantages - you are allowed to work and you only have to show income of 40,000 Baht per month

What's complicated about it? I have one and thought it was very simple.

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For the record, something is wrong IMHO.

I have legal documents from a government school stating that them hiring a 20 y.o. NES was okay. The guy got WP (piece of cake) and the change of his Visa (took 2 hours and the officer objected to his earring laugh.png ) TCT even provided some letter.

If a school wants you, they certainly can get you 1. the B-Visa (and a 2nd one for another 90 days) and 2. a WP. The waiver might be more tricky. (What I have heard about the TCT is not fit to be repeated). But there are those without degrees who worked last semester. I swear this is true and correct.

Without wanting to start a debate about NES and teachers from Africa, I've had some >4/5th of all responses from Cameroonians. Most of those guys wouldn't even pass the TOEIC test with 600 or more points IMHO. So - - - something weird is going on.

Hang in there, that school may know someone at the TCT or have to appeal to the TCT or something.

And PM me if you want evidence for the "qualifications" of a NES age 20.

Edited by Maestro
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...c'mon guys/girls?

"I'm from America/Australia/Canada/Ireland/New Zealand/South Africa/UK"

just means N.E.S.

But increasingly worldwide advertised jobs are including:

"No descernible accent" - this would rule out some people from all the countries above...

including England, Scotland and Wales.

Including myself. I'm from Boston! biggrin.png

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I don't know if the OP is still reading this thread, but if he is, here are the current requirements for teaching legally in Thailand:

1. to get a Thai teaching license you need either a B.Ed, a M.Ed, a post-graduate Diploma in Education or a current teacher's license from your home country. If you don't have any of the above qualifications but do have a B.A. or B.S., you can take 4 tests offered by the TCT. Passing all 4 tests is almost impossible, as the TCT seem to have used google translate to produce the English version of at least one of them.

In addition to the above, a Thai Culture course must be attended.

2. You can get a waiver for a Thai teacher's license for two years or two schools, whichever comes first. You should have a University degree of some sort to get this waiver and should either take the Thai Culture Course or one of thr TCT tests before the end of your first year on a waiver in order to get the second waiver.

A TEFL course is not a requirement and has not been for several years. A post-graduate diploma in Education can be earned in one year and should, in addition to a B.A. or B.S. and the Thai Culture Course, get you a Teacher's License.

TIT and all of the above requirements could be changed tomorrow.

Hi, I'm writing in behalf of a friend. She has a BS diploma and wishes to get the temporary license while she waits to enroll for the online teaching certificate in her home country. She taught in one school last year for one semester(Oct. to March) but now moved to another school for this term. My question is, is she qualified to apply the temp teaching license and if so what are the requirements other than her diploma and transcript of records from her university?

Edited by rendos
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Hi all,



have been informed by the school today that my application for a work permit has been denied, because I am not a qualified teacher, enough though it's a private primary school and I'm from England.




People from England are usually English. That does NOT mean that all English people can be an English teacher in Thailand.



It's not like teaching English in Europe and the States. Not at all. Even "qualified" teachers of the English language, or any subject can struggle in such an unorganized environment.




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Are you saying that you have a Ph.D. in medical sciences and that you want to teach EFL? Are you kidding us?

it is almost like there exists a fear to hire such people as it could show thais that there exists clever non thais.

Or perhaps they don't want to hire people that aren't 'clever' enough to realise that a given job requires a given qualification.

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As far as I know its NEVER happened. I have been here 18 years and directly involved in the English teaching industry.

Using fake documents or overstay, yes. But just teaching without a WP and B visa, no.

The consequences of working illegally or rather working without a work permit can vary to blind eye tactics (for a period anyway) to being thrown out the country with no return, a hefty fine or even jail. In some cases all three. How important is your piece of mind?

Out of interest, does anybody know if this has actually happened? A custodial sentence in Thailand for teaching without a work permit?

I'm sure there are probably provisions for it, but has it ever actually happened?

No, it hasn't happened. Not to an English teacher anyway. In 20 years here, I've known hundreds working without a WP and/or degree.

There have been a couple of instances where foreigners were deported for working without a degree but it's not that simple - they upset the wrong person. If that happens and you have no 'influence' yourself, it doesn't really matter what you've done or not done.

The way things work in this country are not like your own home.

There is always an option of paying a fine rather than going to jail.

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As far as I know its NEVER happened. I have been here 18 years and directly involved in the English teaching industry.

Using fake documents or overstay, yes. But just teaching without a WP and B visa, no.

The consequences of working illegally or rather working without a work permit can vary to blind eye tactics (for a period anyway) to being thrown out the country with no return, a hefty fine or even jail. In some cases all three. How important is your piece of mind?

Out of interest, does anybody know if this has actually happened? A custodial sentence in Thailand for teaching without a work permit?

I'm sure there are probably provisions for it, but has it ever actually happened?

No, it hasn't happened. Not to an English teacher anyway. In 20 years here, I've known hundreds working without a WP and/or degree.

There have been a couple of instances where foreigners were deported for working without a degree but it's not that simple - they upset the wrong person. If that happens and you have no 'influence' yourself, it doesn't really matter what you've done or not done.

The way things work in this country are not like your own home.

There is always an option of paying a fine rather than going to jail.

Good to have such honest posters here. So, you never got caught with your fake documents in all these years?

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Hi all,

have been informed by the school today that my application for a work permit has been denied, because I am not a qualified teacher, enough though it's a private primary school and I'm from England.

What grounds? No TCT provisional teaching permit or teacher license?

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Hi all,

have been informed by the school today that my application for a work permit has been denied, because I am not a qualified teacher, enough though it's a private primary school and I'm from England.

What grounds? No TCT provisional teaching permit or teacher license?

Is that a rhetorical question?-tongue.png

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More often than not; the Thais are their own worst enemies. From the time they are deprived of milk, as youngsters, to the time they die a premature death from cheap alcohol or a good ole fashioned motosai crash or both. Teaching here has had too many gray areas for too long......it does however, take two to tango....they can probably just monitor tourist visa apps by those under 30 in English speaking countries, and rest assured there is an infinite amount of clowns coming, who will work without proper paperwork, and will likely be targets of payday fraud. Migrant farm workers in America have far more rights than farang teachers do in Thailand. Accepting that is a good start. How dare the farang complain about making 25K per month, when a Thai only makes 11K, and a Filipino will do it for 15K.

Edited by Thighlander
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PM me, I have a legal document showing how another school did it in the case of a very young NES.

There is hope.

In the mean time, just work on your B-Visa and get a 2nd B-Visa afterwards,

The inconsistency regarding just this one specific issue makes me sick! Seems it's "hit and miss' in your case while countless others keep teaching happily ever after.

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I have read every single post in this useless thread and nowhere does it say if the OP has a University degree or not.

Sherlock Holmes may tell you that you can then deduce that he does not have a degree. Probably.

I just want to go on record here and say that the Thai educational system is such an abominable joke that it does not matter who gets to teach really. Thais run the schools. Imagine if you owned a motorcycle repair shop, and had some decent mechanics, and the people running the place making all the decisions where 12 years old. It would not be a very good repair shop, in fact, it may be downright abominable. That is what is going on here. A Thai science teacher would probably argue with Stephen Hawking if you gave him a chance, and then Hawking would run for the hills. Hmm, go figure.

I think Hawking would probably trundle not run!

Sent from my XT1032 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

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Hi all,

have been informed by the school today that my application for a work permit has been denied, because I am not a qualified teacher, enough though it's a private primary school and I'm from England.

What grounds? No TCT provisional teaching permit or teacher license?

Normally you are required to have a degree and a TEFL certificate.

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More often than not; the Thais are their own worst enemies. From the time they are deprived of milk, as youngsters, to the time they die a premature death from cheap alcohol or a good ole fashioned motosai crash or both. Teaching here has had too many gray areas for too long......it does however, take two to tango....they can probably just monitor tourist visa apps by those under 30 in English speaking countries, and rest assured there is an infinite amount of clowns coming, who will work without proper paperwork, and will likely be targets of payday fraud. Migrant farm workers in America have far more rights than farang teachers do in Thailand. Accepting that is a good start. How dare the farang complain about making 25K per month, when a Thai only makes 11K, and a Filipino will do it for 15K.

BS, I was asked to edit the English in a letter to Bangkok Ministry of Education regarding the salaries of Thai teachers. The NEW Thai teachers were making 8,000 a month plus "grey" money (such as a free suitcase on one occasion). The teacher with one year of experience was up to 11,000, and the eldest teacher, who had been working since 1983, was on 40,000 baths a month. None of those salaries including the "grey" money, and while I was there several of the senior teachers took an expenses-paid "research" trip to Switzerland to investigate Swiss teaching practices. This was at a relatively rural upcountry school, sure 25,000 is relatively high but the locals' salaries come with all the benefits of being local. I'd say consider yourself as making equal or less pay than the local teachers, hence why it's difficult to attract people who are interested in something other than boozing and whoring it up.

Edited by squarethecircle
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