Jump to content
BANGKOK
Sign in to follow this  
cgphuket

Yearly dodgy school recrutiment rush

Recommended Posts

Have you seen the Ajarn.com jobs list this week? What a joke. I have stopped taking calls from random numbers as it's always an Ajarn can't quite catch the second bit from a school in can't quite understand what she's saying Bangkok. It gets worse every year.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TBH, I'm going to do a Visa run, get that TOEIC test and then be available to be the next day at Nakhon Nowhere at 7:45 am sharp. That's the plan.

FYI, some schools haven't even advertized or tried hiring by any means yet. It boils down to some director benefitting financially from every day those foreign teachers are not hired. Just saying...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I started applying this late afternoon. Got the first desperate call. Apparently, tomorrow is some hiring deadline for government schools...

They wanted me to come overnight to Isaan! I explained that I have video and a scanner and they can witness me signing their contract... thumbsup.gif

Jesus, what a festering mess!

The border runs issue won't help and at some point, enough is enough and it's usually the best teachers who leave. coffee1.gif

Then there is another clear trend: schools and universities wishing to avoid paying for holidays. My last contract ended in February. But the students came to school in March... Things are happening for some financial reason. Remember that whistling.gif

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is sad that some schools complain about the low quality of teachers, and the reputation of SE Asian English teachers has taken a hit over recent years, but it is often the schools themselves that weed out the good teachers by treating them poorly, until many of the remaining applicants are low-tier. Of course, many applicants are unskilled, unreliable and dodgy, but it is the schools responsibility to screen their applicants. Agencies and language schools have put the final nail in the ESL coffins. I have met several teachers who did the math and their teaching clients brought 100-150k a month into the company, while making 25-35k for the privilege. Not all language school owners are rich, but one will never make good money unless they are the owner.

So direct labor is at 16-35%

That seems pretty high to me, what do you think it should be?

What is a fair margin for the owner(s)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is sad that (1) some schools complain about the low quality of teachers, and (2) the reputation of SE Asian English teachers has taken a hit over recent years, but it is often (3) the schools themselves that weed out the good teachers by treating them poorly, until (4) many of the remaining applicants are low-tier. Of course, (5) many applicants are unskilled, unreliable and dodgy, but it is the schools responsibility to screen their applicants. (6) Agencies and language schools have put the final nail in the ESL coffins. (7) I have met several teachers who did the math and their teaching clients brought 100-150k a month into the company, while making 25-35k for the privilege. Not all language school owners are rich, but one will never make good money unless they are the owner.

I count 7 unsubstantiated claims in that paragraph.

(1) some schools complain about the low quality of teachers

(2) the reputation of SE Asian English teachers has taken a hit over recent years

(3) the schools themselves that weed out the good teachers by treating them poorly

(4) many of the remaining applicants are low-tier

(5) many applicants are unskilled, unreliable and dodgy,

(6) Agencies and language schools have put the final nail in the ESL coffins

(7) I have met several teachers who did the math and their teaching clients brought 100-150k a month into the company, while making 25-35k for the privilege

There might be some truth to a few of the claims but this is the rant of someone who really should be doing something other than teaching in Thailand. Life is just too much of a burden for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is sad that some schools complain about the low quality of teachers, and the reputation of SE Asian English teachers has taken a hit over recent years, but it is often the schools themselves that weed out the good teachers by treating them poorly, until many of the remaining applicants are low-tier. Of course, many applicants are unskilled, unreliable and dodgy, but it is the schools responsibility to screen their applicants. Agencies and language schools have put the final nail in the ESL coffins. I have met several teachers who did the math and their teaching clients brought 100-150k a month into the company, while making 25-35k for the privilege. Not all language school owners are rich, but one will never make good money unless they are the owner.

So direct labor is at 16-35%

That seems pretty high to me, what do you think it should be?

What is a fair margin for the owner(s)?

Employees don't receive a percentage of a company's earnings unless they are part of a profit sharing agreement. They receive a salary. The salary is at least the market rate otherwise they wouldn't be able to recruit employees. This is fundamental economics in the real world. Too many foreign teachers live in a strange world where they believe businesses/schools should be run for their benefit.

I would also take his figures with a large pinch of salt. Unless he's audited the accounts of the school/business, he doesn't know where the money goes.

Edited by Loaded
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should try working for a moving company when teachers are moving out. Every quote I send is expensive. Everyone wants to send their 3 cubic metres of pants to the other side of the world for 50p

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is sad that some schools complain about the low quality of teachers, and the reputation of SE Asian English teachers has taken a hit over recent years, but it is often the schools themselves that weed out the good teachers by treating them poorly, until many of the remaining applicants are low-tier. Of course, many applicants are unskilled, unreliable and dodgy, but it is the schools responsibility to screen their applicants. Agencies and language schools have put the final nail in the ESL coffins. I have met several teachers who did the math and their teaching clients brought 100-150k a month into the company, while making 25-35k for the privilege. Not all language school owners are rich, but one will never make good money unless they are the owner.

So direct labor is at 16-35%

That seems pretty high to me, what do you think it should be?

What is a fair margin for the owner(s)?

Employees don't receive a percentage of a company's earnings unless they are part of a profit sharing agreement. They receive a salary. The salary is at least the market rate otherwise they wouldn't be able to recruit employees. This is fundamental economics in the real world. Too many foreign teachers live in a strange world where they believe businesses/schools should be run for their benefit.

I would also take his figures with a large pinch of salt. Unless he's audited the accounts of the school/business, he doesn't know where the money goes.

Fundamental economics also say when you have a lot of illegal workers (not correct visa or work-permit) in a certain kind of business, the salaries will be lower than it should be.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the people responding to the question of payment pointed out that market economics is to pay the least amount of money possible to those you employ. I hope this person is not a teacher. Teaching is more than merely standing in a room checking that students understand the grammar. There is a relationship between teacher and student which goes far beyond the financial reward. I do not say to my students that the lesson is finished on the hour. Questions they raise and their individual needs have to be met after school.

Employers too need to understand that if they hire at the lowest rate, the teachers will need to do too many hours to give time for preparation and quality lesson development. All participants in this market need to recognise the great divide between education and hourly money making. Once we understand this we can clearly draw the lines between the two different arena of employment.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is sad that some schools complain about the low quality of teachers, and the reputation of SE Asian English teachers has taken a hit over recent years, but it is often the schools themselves that weed out the good teachers by treating them poorly, until many of the remaining applicants are low-tier. Of course, many applicants are unskilled, unreliable and dodgy, but it is the schools responsibility to screen their applicants. Agencies and language schools have put the final nail in the ESL coffins. I have met several teachers who did the math and their teaching clients brought 100-150k a month into the company, while making 25-35k for the privilege. Not all language school owners are rich, but one will never make good money unless they are the owner.

So direct labor is at 16-35%

That seems pretty high to me, what do you think it should be?

What is a fair margin for the owner(s)?

Employees don't receive a percentage of a company's earnings unless they are part of a profit sharing agreement. They receive a salary. The salary is at least the market rate otherwise they wouldn't be able to recruit employees. This is fundamental economics in the real world. Too many foreign teachers live in a strange world where they believe businesses/schools should be run for their benefit.

I would also take his figures with a large pinch of salt. Unless he's audited the accounts of the school/business, he doesn't know where the money goes.

Employees absolutely do receive a percentage of a company’s earnings.

Where else would the company get money for payroll if not from earnings?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...