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Driving a small Thai motorcycle or scooter into Cambodia


Tomtomtom69

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Hi,

Just wondering if anyone knows whether a Thai registered motorcycle or scooter (a small one, 125cc) can be driven into Cambodia for a few days? I know that some borders will allow Thai cars across (such as Koh Kong) but I have never once seen a motorcycle or scooter cross or heard about any crossings by motorcycle, save for a few interpred travellers or a convoy of some sort, which don't seem to be organized very often. I haven't seen much posted over on Rideasia.net or GTrider either. Most riders there talk about heading over to Laos, which seems to be OK at certain crossings, but mainly if your bike is over 250cc. I have read almost nothing about Cambodia.

Phuketrichard, do you know anything? If I'm going to attempt this, I would like to be fairly certain Cambodian customs is going to be OK before I head over there, not waste my time all the while having to park my bike in the back of my pickup on the Thai side like last time at Nong Khai (reason I'm not taking my pickup across is that it's quite new and is still on finance and Thanachart Bank doesn't want to issue a power of attorney to allow my car to be taken outside of Thailand temporarily - so will probably have to wait until the car is paid off).

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no problem,

make sure u have the motorcyle green book in your name to clear customs in Thailand.

going into Cambodia, they might charge you 100-500 baht but.... They let bikes in at Koh Kong, Poi Pet and Osmach

Few things;

your insurance is no good in Cambodia so be carefull, also YOU can not ride with your lights on in the daytime ( but you can ride without them at night)

If you go to Shv expect to be stopped and fined

reason you dont see lots on gt riders (many of whom are based in Northern Thailand ) is the roads are getting worse an worse in Cambodia an are heavliy travelled.

Even if u talk to guys that live there an ride, they are real carefull, On my travels i have seen a few Thai bikes but not many.

Laos is heaven for a motoryclist compared to Cambodia thumbsup.gif

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no problem,

make sure u have the motorcyle green book in your name to clear customs in Thailand.

going into Cambodia, they might charge you 100-500 baht but.... They let bikes in at Koh Kong, Poi Pet and Osmach

Few things;

your insurance is no good in Cambodia so be carefull, also YOU can not ride with your lights on in the daytime ( but you can ride without them at night)

If you go to Shv expect to be stopped and fined

reason you dont see lots on gt riders (many of whom are based in Northern Thailand ) is the roads are getting worse an worse in Cambodia an are heavliy travelled.

Even if u talk to guys that live there an ride, they are real carefull, On my travels i have seen a few Thai bikes but not many.

Laos is heaven for a motoryclist compared to Cambodia thumbsup.gif

Green book is indeed in my name, so no problems there.

My bike, just like most other bikes built in Thailand in the last few years don't have an option of turning off lights during the daytime, so that won't be an option. In February I was in Phnom Penh and always forgot to turn off my lights during the day as I already had them switched on at night the previous night (how can I remember something that nobody riding a newer bike in Thailand has had to do for years, hehe?)

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any mechanic can easliy put in an on/off switch to turn the lights off

Or black tape over the headlamp.

You will be stopped with thai plates an lights on in shv, the rest of the country usualy no problem

I dont rent bikes but even driving, i avoid as much as i can driving at night

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any mechanic can easliy put in an on/off switch to turn the lights off

Or black tape over the headlamp.

You will be stopped with thai plates an lights on in shv, the rest of the country usualy no problem

I dont rent bikes but even driving, i avoid as much as i can driving at night

The black tape over the headlights is a better idea. Only thing is it might become a bit frustrating to have to take it away in the evening and then re-apply in the morning, but for a trip of just a few days it's fine. I realize the on/off switch would be an option but I don't want to do any unnecessary work on my bike as this will be my first ever trip across to another country on my bike and one I may not make on my bike again for a long time, so the easiest and cheapest solution is one I can do myself without investing in any tools, which is the black tape thing.

Have you seen a lot of Thai plated bikes driving inside Cambodia? I have seen some, but they seem exceptionally rare moving even a km away from the border. Just browsed over on some Thai language forums about Thais complaining they couldn't cross into Cambodia at Poipet last year on their bikes and assumed this was a reflection of the rules throughout the whole country, which clearly isn't the case.

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FYI;

the only times i have seen Thai licensed bikes are if there in a group, ( they get guys coming over from Pattaya sometimes)

but very few individual riders.

Poi pet is dicey to let you in,

Osmach and Koh Kong are the best bets

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FYI;

the only times i have seen Thai licensed bikes are if there in a group, ( they get guys coming over from Pattaya sometimes)

but very few individual riders.

Poi pet is dicey to let you in,

Osmach and Koh Kong are the best bets

Thanks a lot. I think that's because at Poipet they only want to let you in if you're on a pre-arranged tour. Read about this on a Thai language forum where a Thai guy complained about it and assumed these rules were in place at every Cambodian border and that going on a tour was the only way in. Obviously the guy was a bit naive assuming that the country would do everything consistently and by the book - it seems like he chose the wrong border crossing and never attempted any others.

Anyway, I will try Koh Kong. I have seen recent trip reports of individuals going in on bikes, including one over on gt-rider.com and another few on rideasia.net, all the riders in question crossed at either Koh Kong, Ban Pakkard/Prom or O'Smach except one who managed at Poipet but that crossing I wouldn't try due to it's uncertainty and the large number of people anyway. Maybe it's the uncertainty and lack of consistent rules that stops larger numbers of riders crossing over from Thailand to Cambodia, but at the same time I've never seen even one Cambodian plated bike on the Thai side, perhaps they are not being let in (only Cambodian cars are).

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i know more than one expats with Cambodian bikes that cross over into Thailand with zero troubles

Then I should have no trouble going in the opposite direction either, particularly as I am a holder of a Cambodian 1-year visa (and therefore an expat of sorts, even though I only obtained the 1-year extension to save myself applying for a new visa every time I travel as I am making a lot of Cambodian entries this year) and a Thai bike and I am going across at a crossing that allows entry of Thai and foreign vehicles (Koh Kong).

Although, I have read on the Phnom Penh Post website that Cambodian motorcycles have been prevented from crossing into Thailand at the O'Smach crossing, even though they were just going to the market (due to protests by Thai vendors). Perhaps only non-Cambodian foreigners are allowed to bring a Cambo motorcycle into Thailand, or it depends on the size of the bike (I hope not, but the report by two Thais driving Thai scooters into Cambodia at Koh Kong has reassured me somewhat).

BTW I have heard reports that the Cambo side doesn't provide any documents for temporarily imported foreign vehicles. Does this mean when I enter Cambodia with my bike that I'd only have with me the Thai export papers, I might have to pay the guy at the gate 100 Baht and then I'm free to go? How does it work? I asked the customs guy there about taking a car across and he said it was 100 Baht, but didn't mention any documents, nor did I ask about motorcycles as I didn't think about it at the time.

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ahh now ur asking the questions :-)

I have heard Cambodians are not being allowed to use the Osmach crossing to visit the market as well.

MY experiences

Thailand gives you the temp export papers, at Osmach you enter Cambodia an thats that, one time they photographed my license plate an that was all.

Koh Kong, both times i entered there they TOOK my thai export papers and asked how long i was going in for one time i said 5 days, one time 2 days

100 baht /day charge,they issued me a red plastic plate an told me i was only allowed to drive in Koh Kong Province.

I exited at Pailin and poi pet, both times just told them I lost the export papers when i came onto thailand, They just gave me new ones to fill out.

When i was stopped in SHV once for running a red light the cop gave me a 20 minute lecture in PERFECT english ( he also knew my gf personally) why he had stopped me, the legality of driving a Thai car in Cambodia, why i should not be there etc etc, a real nice guy, Than asked for $20 an explained that there were 4 of them so $5 each. He told me if i wanted a receipt i could follow him to the Police station but there it might cost more an they might confiscate my car...

Its Cambodia 555555

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"ahh now ur asking the questions :-)


I have heard Cambodians are not being allowed to use the Osmach crossing to visit the market as well."



Since the coup I have see seen zero Cambodian vehicles on the Chong Chom Market side of the crossing. Only those with a valid passport allowed to enter Thailand.


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ahh now ur asking the questions :-)

I have heard Cambodians are not being allowed to use the Osmach crossing to visit the market as well.

MY experiences

Thailand gives you the temp export papers, at Osmach you enter Cambodia an thats that, one time they photographed my license plate an that was all.

Koh Kong, both times i entered there they TOOK my thai export papers and asked how long i was going in for one time i said 5 days, one time 2 days 100 baht /day charge,they issued me a red plastic plate an told me i was only allowed to drive in Koh Kong Province.

I exited at Pailin and poi pet, both times just told them I lost the export papers when i came onto thailand, They just gave me new ones to fill out.

When i was stopped in SHV once for running a red light the cop gave me a 20 minute lecture in PERFECT english ( he also knew my gf personally) why he had stopped me, the legality of driving a Thai car in Cambodia, why i should not be there etc etc, a real nice guy, Than asked for $20 an explained that there were 4 of them so $5 each. He told me if i wanted a receipt i could follow him to the Police station but there it might cost more an they might confiscate my car...

Its Cambodia 555555

But he didn't tell you that it wasn't legal to enter Cambodia using a Thai car right (and what did he mean by "why you shouldn't be there"?) Anyway, looks like he didn't care, and police aren't customs. In general there aren't many foreign registered vehicles driving anywhere in Cambodia, whether they are Thai (have seen Thai trucks and buses traveling between Poipet and Phnom Penh and BKK-Siem Reap vv, but that's part of an official agreement between the two countries), a couple of Thai cars in Phnom Penh, one Lao car in Phnom Penh and one time near Kampong Cham, one Chinese car (surprisingly!) back in 2011 driving near Sisophon towards the Thai border (probably came in via O'Smach as coming in any other way that car probably would have been refused as Chinese cars can't enter Vietnam and while they can easily enter Laos, Laos to Cambodia doesn't work very well although in the other direction it tends to be OK) and only one Vietnamese car in Phnom Penh earlier this year (this was a government license plate though). Vietnamese buses are of course plentiful in PP and Siem Reap too, but foreign registered private vehicles are not commonly seen in Cambodia.

You mentioned these red number plates, but how would one fit one on a motorcycle, by unscrewing the THai number plate and affixing the temp Cambodian one? Or are they only given to cars?

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"ahh now ur asking the questions :-)

I have heard Cambodians are not being allowed to use the Osmach crossing to visit the market as well."

Since the coup I have see seen zero Cambodian vehicles on the Chong Chom Market side of the crossing. Only those with a valid passport allowed to enter Thailand.

I have responded to your thread about the Thai side not allowing Thai vehicles out of Thailand or Cambodian vehicles into Thailand at the Chong Chom crossing. I wonder whether it's a temporary measure due to the coup, or perhaps more permanent (I hope not).

Also wondering if maybe the other crossings are like that as well, particularly Koh Kong.

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it is 100% legal

BUT to be 100% legal, your supposed to obtain permission in advance from the transport office in PP. Who can be bothered ( although i do know one one guy did do that)

I have seen; Lao, Russian, Chinese, German and UK cars in Cambodia

Also Chinese, Laos, Thai and even one Swedish motorcycles

As to red plate, i have only told you my personal experience with a car.

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it is 100% legal

BUT to be 100% legal, your supposed to obtain permission in advance from the transport office in PP. Who can be bothered ( although i do know one one guy did do that)

I have seen; Lao, Russian, Chinese, German and UK cars in Cambodia

Also Chinese, Laos, Thai and even one Swedish motorcycles

As to red plate, i have only told you my personal experience with a car.

Maybe the Russian cars were the same ones I saw in Mae Sot, coming over from Myanmar late last year.

Sounds like you've spent a lot more time in Cambodia than I have, but apart from a few local cars near the border, i.e. mainly the Thai border and perhaps near the Lao border too (although these days there are effectively no more private vehicles allowed to cross between Vietnam and Cambodia) chances are that such sightings of foreign registered vehicles in Cambodia, from any other countries other than the aforementioned local ones are exceptionally rare, you might see one foreign car/motorcycle every few months or something, unlike in most parts of Laos where you see foreign registered vehicles everyday.

It seems there are no rules as to who is allowed across or not, you just take a gamble when you arrive and see if they permit you or not. I have read various reports of non-local traffic crossing, including an Australian motorcyclist who was refused at one of the crossings near Surin, but was finally allowed to cross at nearby Chong Jom, but such reports are spread apart by a few years. Anyway, now doesn't seem like the right time to cross into Cambodia with your own vehicle, given the Thai coup tightening up things and whereas up until a few years ago you could drive a Lao, Cambodian or other at least LHD vehicle (or motorcycle) between Vietnam and Cambodia, nowadays even local vehicles are refused - only commercial vehicles can cross now.

I wonder if any of these other foreign registered vehicles you have sighted obtained permission from PP (likely that would necessitate a trip in person before finally coming back with your car), by the sounds of it, probably not.

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