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Retirement in Krabi.


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@ajarnsiam said "It is against UK law to claim a pension on the basis of a fraudulent UK residence when you are registered and living as a retiree in Thailand. I'm not sure what the penalty would be for this, but I guess it could jeopardise your pension rights as well as giving you a criminal record."

Australian Centrelink (Social Security) records are now linked to airport/immigration records so they know when you come and go automatically - so you could not achieve the above if you tried.

Don't suppose I would be registered as a retiree, wouldn't be on a.retirement visa just a marriage one?

Sent from my LG-P880 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

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Is it necessary or desirable to get a thai bank account or is it just as easy and cheap to use my UK bank?

Why not, if you are living here it makes sense. I would suggest Bangkok Bank they seem to offer the closest standard to what we are used to at home. But keep the UK account and ATM card, it can be useful.

If I marry my thai g/f, what kind of visa will I get that does away with visa runs?

I can never remember the letter but yes and you will just have to do a 90 day appearance at Immigration. The income requirements are much lower than a Retirement Visa, 400K for over two months or 40,000 per month income.

Anybody got any links to insurance for retired farangs?

I use AXA for international cover but sit down before you call them!

Oh! and I'd just like to add, I aint got the money for a retirement visa and I'm already renting a bungalow in Ao Nang for 3,500baht a month.

That is cheap, over her in Phuket you wouldn't even get a room for that, maybe a miniature one !

S

Are you serious about those money requirements? I aint even got that unless the baht nosedives.

Sent from my LG-P880 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

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Police order 777/2551

(6) In case of marriage with a Thai lady, the husband who is an alien must have an average annual income of not less than 40,000 baht per month or a money deposit in a local Thai bank of not less than 400,000 baht for the past 2 months for expenses within a year.

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Is it necessary or desirable to get a thai bank account or is it just as easy and cheap to use my UK bank?

Why not, if you are living here it makes sense. I would suggest Bangkok Bank they seem to offer the closest standard to what we are used to at home. But keep the UK account and ATM card, it can be useful.

If I marry my thai g/f, what kind of visa will I get that does away with visa runs?

I can never remember the letter but yes and you will just have to do a 90 day appearance at Immigration. The income requirements are much lower than a Retirement Visa, 400K for over two months or 40,000 per month income.

Anybody got any links to insurance for retired farangs?

I use AXA for international cover but sit down before you call them!

Oh! and I'd just like to add, I aint got the money for a retirement visa and I'm already renting a bungalow in Ao Nang for 3,500baht a month.

That is cheap, over her in Phuket you wouldn't even get a room for that, maybe a miniature one !

S

Are you serious about those money requirements? I aint even got that unless the baht nosedives.

Sent from my LG-P880 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

You can't live here as a retired without any money or visa for living here. Do you really like to spend your life as retired and old in a 3500 baht bungalow on the beach? And do visa and border runs all the time? The Immigration will probably not allow you to do it also. In the long run those visa and border runs will cost even more than the extension of stay. If you have 38k in pension. How can you say that there is no way you can afford 400k or 40k a month!!!!! You only need 2k more a month!! That's your pension and 24k on a bank account with the combo method.

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Are you serious about those money requirements? I aint even got that unless the baht nosedives.

Sent from my LG-P880 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

I'm afraid so. Well that's if you extend or convert it when you are here.

From memory, so please someone correct me if I'm wrong, the process is that you get a Non O visa in the UK (£150). This has to be based on some reason to come, such as a wife here, you cannot work or get a work permit on it, and you have to leave the country every 90 days. They did tell me to bring bank statements when applying, but never looked at them, just the marriage certificate. When I arrived I then changed this to a "marriage " visa and at that point had to show the 400K in my Thai bank account and every year since.

I'm sure that someone (I'm in a different screen on my ipad so I can't remember who it was, perhaps Sandy) just gets the Non- O visa for a year and then goes back to the UK when it expires for a holiday, and then just gets another Non-O when he wants to come back. In theory that brings your annual costs down to £150 a year plus flights to and from the motherland, so not bad. Also a good opportunity to stock up on Marmite & PG/Tetley which are so expensive here or not available at all.

I'm not sure if there is a limit on the amount of consecutive Non - O's you can get , but I doubt it.

I can't remember, do you have property in the UK ? If you so don't sell it but rent it out instead, for additional income and a safety net.

I like Ao Nang, not as busy as over here and a lot of pleasant people.

Regards

SDM

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Are you serious about those money requirements? I aint even got that unless the baht nosedives.

Sent from my LG-P880 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

I'm afraid so. Well that's if you extend or convert it when you are here.

From memory, so please someone correct me if I'm wrong, the process is that you get a Non O visa in the UK (£150). This has to be based on some reason to come, such as a wife here, you cannot work or get a work permit on it, and you have to leave the country every 90 days. They did tell me to bring bank statements when applying, but never looked at them, just the marriage certificate. When I arrived I then changed this to a "marriage " visa and at that point had to show the 400K in my Thai bank account and every year since.

I'm sure that someone (I'm in a different screen on my ipad so I can't remember who it was, perhaps Sandy) just gets the Non- O visa for a year and then goes back to the UK when it expires for a holiday, and then just gets another Non-O when he wants to come back. In theory that brings your annual costs down to £150 a year plus flights to and from the motherland, so not bad. Also a good opportunity to stock up on Marmite & PG/Tetley which are so expensive here or not available at all.

I'm not sure if there is a limit on the amount of consecutive Non - O's you can get , but I doubt it.

I can't remember, do you have property in the UK ? If you so don't sell it but rent it out instead, for additional income and a safety net.

I like Ao Nang, not as busy as over here and a lot of pleasant people.

Regards

SDM

Yes he can get a multiple non-O in the UK. Based on Thai family. Or based on retirement. And there is no limit on consecutive visas. The immigration will probably question him after a few years going out and in every 90 days.

But going back to UK every year. And staying one or two weeks. Travelling to the embassy/consulate to get the visa. It will probably take two of his monthly pensions in cost every time. And that's a lot if you are on a tight budget

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I get by on just under 10k a month, rent for 1 year pre-paid (3200pm equiv), wife's shoe business covers utilities + wiffi (1,700), petrol and any titbits for friends & family. 10k car loan comes back on line in Sept after using up the tax refund.

10000 baht a month?

Even assuming you don't have kids and you are happy to go native you must have a very understanding wife!

I don't know why people invariably question the amount that others state they can live comfortably on; because this person feels that to live happily they need X amount has absolutely no bearing on others' ability to feel they are living like kings on a quarter of that sum. And what does an understanding wife have to do with it, for God's sake? A wife could well be the prime mover in such a lifestyle - such women do exist, even in Thailand and even in the cities, contrary to the image of Thai womanhood entrenched among certain elements on ThaiVisa

Probably because you make the OP a huge disservice when saying 10k is plenty of money for living here.

Reread his post. He says he lives on 10k outside of rent, utilities petrol, and tidbits. He's actually living on about 16-17k baht which is doable.,

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Simple answer to your question is no, it is not possible to live on 38,000 baht per month in Thailand as an ex-pat. You have to think about medical...can you afford to fly back to England for an operation....the airfare is 30,000 low season...what about somewhere to live, yes accommodation is cheap in Thailand but it isn't free, and it's more expensive in resort areas. Frankly pretty much everything is more expensive in Krabi/Ao Nang than in rural Thailand.

I know some guys who live in rural Thailand on a state pension, but they have savings for emergencies and have houses that they have built....they still run short of money from time to time and are forced into the embarrassing position of having to borrow a few thousand baht...

Other have made the comment that retirement visas require several thousand in the bank for 3 months before you apply and can be costly if you want a re-entry permit. The other way to do it is to leave the country every 90 days...I know a lot of people who do this, and don;t seem to mind....but to mu way of thinking immigration to Thailand is not getting any easier for poorer people....Thailand wants people who spend money in the country not foreigners living on a pittance...so future changes in immigration are likely to make it harder to stay, rather than easier.

Personally mate, I stay at home unless you have a couple of hundred thousand savings or proceeds from the sale of you house...it ain't much fun being a poor farang in Thailand.

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I left the UK to work overseas in 1973 and then paid voluntary Class 3 contributions sufficient for the maximum basic UK pension. Hence, the SERPS contribution was only for one or two years and doesn't amount to much.

I would still like to know how the OP has a UK gov pension of GBP 163.

On expenses in Thailand, I keep detailed records and my ACTUAL average monthly expenditure in Bangkok (with wife and kid) are as follows:

2010 = 33,418 baht / month.

2011 = 41,477 baht / month.

2012 = 43,781 baht / month.

2013 = 41,405 baht / month.

I own my own condo outright (but I have another condo). Above does not include school fees, health expenses, capital items (new washing machine, etc), travel, car maintenance, entertainment, and hobbies.

I definitely do not live a lavish lifestyle.

Good luck on 38K a month.

It is quite easy if you spent your working life in the UK. My pension is larger than that and is made up of 5 components. The largest after the basic is the "earnings related"

You need to pay class 1 contributions to get the additional state pension. On the NHS issue it is only class 1 that carries the NH contribution. When they talk about 10 years contributions, they mean 10 years class 1.

I haven't spent all my working life in the UK, but most of it, and obviously enough as that is the quote the lady in the pension office gave me when I signed on.

They changed the rules a couple of years back so you only have to do 30 years class 1 to get the full basic and any additional entitlement.

When it was 44 years you only had to miss a few years before losing some of your pension.

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I'm somewhat perplexed that a poster who has been a member of this forum since 2009 and has more than 1200 posts under his belt would ask such a naïve, newbie type question!

He frequently posts vehemently about Thai politics, but knows nothing about COL and visa issues?

I note he hasn't been back to his thread to respond to any answers.

While an interesting discussion for many, I have to wonder about the OP's motives in starting it.

Im sorry I've somewhat perplexed you, simple answer is, I'm a live for the moment type, never been organised or a planner, never thought about retirement but now I've reached 65 I'm thinking about it. Had a longtime association with Thailand, first visited in '66, then not again till '88 but since many times including 2 times for 12 months, 3. times for 6 months, numerous 3 months and even a fair splattering of month or shorter trips. Got a future wife in Ao Nang and a really good deal on a small bungalow we've had since 2009. My choice is basically, keep working and only visit once a year for 3 weeks but live quite well in the UK, or go for it and see how the cookie crumbles.

Sent from my LG-P880 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

Just like you, I was a member of Thaivisa for 5 years, and visited many times for longer and longer periods, before I moved here, so I shouldn't really be perplexed. tongue.png

A few differences, I was studying for, and planning, my move from day one, so I knew everything possible about COL, visas, etc, I could without actually being there. And, I stay out of local politics!

It greatly depends on what you are leaving behind, but I would say go for it if the money works for you. Owning a residence makes a huge difference.

However, I don't think I would have been brave enough to do it on your level of income.

Good luck.

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Where did you get the 163 from? The basic state pension - which excludes GMP and SERPS - is currently 113.10. It is intended it should increase substantially in 2016, but not to 163. And you will need to have enough years' contributions to qualify - 35 years for those retiring after 2016. You can defer the pension and benefit from the equivalent of an extra 10.4% per year, or a [taxable] lump sum, enhanced by 2.0% over base rate.

And someone mentioned that you will not benefit from annual increases if you live outside of the UK. Not exactly right. You certainly will lose out in Thailand, but not, for example, if you live in the Philippines, which has a reciprocal agreement with the UK - though reciprocal in what way is not entirely clear.

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The responses to your question is very good and balanced content from the contributors.

Retirement here is a very contextual decision and can only really be understood by being here for some time - I would suggest for this for you to invest £750 on a 3/6 months for flight and stay - Your living costs in a non expensive part of Bangkok can be around £550 / month (Rent, food, beer, travel, utilities) - The costs in saving from not being in UK will somewhat / pay offset the Bangkok cost for same things. And for example just on savings from utilities, House insurance, Local authority charge(UK), food, beer can be a significant contribution to lowering your offset amount.

Location - Making this investment will help you become a wiser man to make the choice more easy for you. I recommend you make Bangkok your base for the ease and options to travel from Bangkok to potential areas to investigate the location possibilities for longer term retirement

On the financial side - Your earnings from state pension are doable, but as everyone on this forum knows everyone has different needs and lifestyles - However there are many that are living on what your earning on state pension and having a good life here.

Health costs can be a problem if you have a sudden need arising and this is a worry that most of think about by being here - But also need to balance this with feeling better everyday by being here and possibly being more healthy - If you do not go off the rails with the temptations on offer.

State pension fixed - It does get fixed at a level once you retire here, but this is not immediately since you are not considered as being resident by UK until you have been here 2/3 years - Also you can reset the freeze on the retirement pension fixed point by periodically going back to UK and becoming a resident again in UK - The rules on all pension you do however need to talk with UK Gov pensions since there have been a number of changes in how long it takes to be a non resident and also what are the conditions for resetting the pension indexation as being regarded as resident in UK. So my details here are for general guidance only.

UK residence/non-residence rules have changed, changed, and changed again. It certainly isn't 2/3 years, now.

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I must have a hole in my pocket. My rent is similar, her pocket money is 5k more, electric is the same, water is less, travel costs are similar and do have fast internet and a lot of TV channels but I go through twice that a month. I don't drink, don't buy hookers and all my massages are free. I did spent 3k at Top Market yesterday though. I'm certainly not saving anything by living here.

I'm living on 65.000 a month.

17.000 Rent (could find a cheaper house but like to live comfortably)

1.000 electricity

200 water

15.000 pocket money for wife and kids

32.000 for the other things like car, bike, travel...

00.000 left at the end of the month

Wouldn't like to restrict myself too much.

But compare how you would live on your pension in the UK/Thailand.

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I'm somewhat perplexed that a poster who has been a member of this forum since 2009 and has more than 1200 posts under his belt would ask such a naïve, newbie type question!

He frequently posts vehemently about Thai politics, but knows nothing about COL and visa issues?

I note he hasn't been back to his thread to respond to any answers.

While an interesting discussion for many, I have to wonder about the OP's motives in starting it.

Im sorry I've somewhat perplexed you, simple answer is, I'm a live for the moment type, never been organised or a planner, never thought about retirement but now I've reached 65 I'm thinking about it. Had a longtime association with Thailand, first visited in '66, then not again till '88 but since many times including 2 times for 12 months, 3. times for 6 months, numerous 3 months and even a fair splattering of month or shorter trips. Got a future wife in Ao Nang and a really good deal on a small bungalow we've had since 2009. My choice is basically, keep working and only visit once a year for 3 weeks but live quite well in the UK, or go for it and see how the cookie crumbles.

Sent from my LG-P880 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

Just like you, I was a member of Thaivisa for 5 years, and visited many times for longer and longer periods, before I moved here, so I shouldn't really be perplexed. tongue.png

A few differences, I was studying for, and planning, my move from day one, so I knew everything possible about COL, visas, etc, I could without actually being there. And, I stay out of local politics!

It greatly depends on what you are leaving behind, but I would say go for it if the money works for you. Owning a residence makes a huge difference.

However, I don't think I would have been brave enough to do it on your level of income.

Good luck.

What is COL?

I do stay out of local politics, especially as all my local friends are yellow and I'm not. I have one friend of 20yrs I have spoken a bit to, but even he's the same, they all just look down on northern people and refuse to see them as equals.

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