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pinkpanther99

Foreign teachers in Thailand now need education degree?

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I am just going to throw this out here and hope I can get some information: I previously had no intention of working in Thailand. My fiance and her family are all professionals and have suggested I teach, in order to at least have some daily occupation and not grow idle. I felt I could offer no real skill, so have remained suspect. I do have two bachelors (BS) and a masters (MS). I did major in English in my undergrad. I suspect the only thing others would be interested in is if I taught English. I have no other English credentials, except book writing.

Can I teach here? Do I have a background that would be useful? Am I approximately qualified as my peers?

Edited by arjunadawn
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I am a retired American teacher with a degree in English Education. I can't get a job teaching English in the Thai public school system because I am too old. Two years ago I did some consulting work at a local college. All the classes I worked were on the third or fourth floors. I would go to the classrooms with teachers in their 30's and 40's. By the third floor I had to slow down so as not to embarrass them.

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I read AJARN daily....and have not seen this "requirement" as stated in this post. Perhaps this is a troll post???? Perhaps the OP could identify specifically where this AJARN info is located (if it truly exist????). It would be nice to review it. Could the OP provide a link? Perhaps this type of fact-lacking post should be deleted if proper facts can not be provided??

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I read AJARN daily....and have not seen this "requirement" as stated in this post. Perhaps this is a troll post???? Perhaps the OP could identify specifically where this AJARN info is located (if it truly exist????). It would be nice to review it. Could the OP provide a link? Perhaps this type of fact-lacking post should be deleted if proper facts can not be provided??

My Filipino guitar tutor told me teachers at her school were being asked for this. However, they are other music teachers (that are qualified in music performance, not music ed) and are now required to go back to get some sort of extra qualification. They are also Filipino's and I get the sneaky suspicion that things would be harder for them here in Thailand than with westerners (believe it or not...)

It was actually music performance I was interested in studying for at ABAC. Not sure if I want to waste 4 years if it won't let me get another teaching job (whether it be teaching English or music) at the end of it though bah.gif

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go back home and get qualified then come back to sunny thailand if that is the rules then thats the rules live with it.

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English teachers, as an owner of an eng language school I feel I'm qualified to comment. I find those with a degree in education and or English really not up to much for teaching English as a second language. To be a good English teacher you need to be able to "step outside the box" & those trained to teach in western schools aren't to happy about changing their method of teaching. I'll employ & pay well some one with a TEFL or such, but also pay some one with a masters in TEFL even better. I must say I prefer mature teachers, rule of thumb, they're reliable & punctual & actually hand in lesson plans. Younger ones are there for the money & can't get out the door quick enough at the end of the day. These are my thoughts & experiences in the teaching industry in Australia ; however, having taught in Thailand. I saw pretty much the same.

In addition to the decent qualified teachers we've had at my middle of the way school, we also had some really bad ones. One had serious mental problems and other couldn't teach his way out of a paper bag. There are TEFL only teachers much better at the job.

But hey ho, no piece of paper, no joy.

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go back home and get qualified then come back to sunny thailand if that is the rules then thats the rules live with it.

Tell them darn it. They still do not understand, tell them again.

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They wont get many teachers with a degree for the khinial wages that they pay

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As an English teacher, and having been here for over 2 years now, I can say that the system DOES need to be overhauled. However, making an Education degree a requirement is NOT the way to go. I myself do not have an Education degree. I have been teaching for a large amount of my life though in military, corporate and government settings. I do have a TEFL certificate.

By the standards that have been proposed, I will be out of a job when my extension of teaching license expires in 2 years, and will have to return to the USA. I have done continuing education, and I have also challenged the Thai teachers' test, passing 4 of the 9 sections. Now though, the test has been discontinued and there is no clear steps anymore for us to get a license other than to have the Education degree.

I agree that the backpackers with nothing to do that are just teaching to pass the time until the weekend should go. The teachers that are working on a tourist visa should go - the visa runs have effectively killed that now. But make all of us have an Education degree, and there are going to be NO teachers in this country inside of a year. Salaries are not competitive (out in the sticks in Phrae province, I make 30ish K Baht, and live comfortably, but near any city or tourist center it would be difficult to live on.

If the requirement for an Education degree goes into effect, a higher salary MUST be paid. End of story. I can't afford to go back to school on my salary to get my M. Ed. degree....so unless something changes I, too, will be leaving Thailand in 2 years.....even though my school has already offered to keep me on permanently.

Thats a crying shame as you seem to care,far more than the ones you mentioned in your post.

good luck and hope you continue teaching

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I have noticed a few positions on Ajarn lately requiring a PGCE as well as TEFl....I assume this is what the OP means rather than Ba. Bsc which has been a requirement for many years although not always adhered to

the education ministry probably dont know what they mean themselves.

i have gone for a couple of jobs with education agents where qualifications weren't mentioned until i thought i should mention i had a CELTA - they didnt know what it was. i didnt take work through these agents as the obviously had no idea what they were talking about.

its highly likely education department staff dont know what a PGCE is.

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I think it's only right that a teacher of English should have an education degree., just being a native English speaker doesn't make an English teacher. That would be like saying because i can drive a car, that makes me a mechanic.

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