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sirchai

Would A BA In Social Pedagogy From A German University Be Considered As A Degree In Education?

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Hello and Swasdee khrap,

As the title already says.would such a degree, which I'd translated into Thai a couple of years ago, considered a degree in education, or not?

Just curious, as pedagogy is an educational field. Any response would be deeply appreciated.

My point being is that some Asians do have degrees in education, but were actually made in Tagalog, or other Asian languages.

Please be aware that this is NOT a Filipino bashing post. Thank you for your consideration.-.wai2.gif

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P.S. I didn't translate the degree/transcripts myself. It was done by an accredited office and is approved.

Edited by sirchai

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As it's a BA and not a B.Ed., I don't think it will be considered to be an educational degree. I have a B.A. in TEFL and I was refused a Teachers License as I do not hold a B.Ed.

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As it's a BA and not a B.Ed., I don't think it will be considered to be an educational degree. I have a B.A. in TEFL and I was refused a Teachers License as I do not hold a B.Ed.

Sad to hear that they'd refused your TL.

I wanted to go for a Master's in English on weekends, which would have taken my weekends for about three years at Rajabhat Ubon R.

But that's not even considered to receive the TL by the TCT in Bangkok. Do these guys at the TCT actually know what pedagogy means?

Unfortunately, it seems that the word pedagogy isn't widely used in the English language,It's usually called Social education.

And pedagogy is a part of education.

Whatever they want to see, don't you think that 10 years of teaching English in Thailand doesn't qualify somebody who doesn't even have a BA?

So let's play with BA's in social education and B in education. You should read the e-mails, I've received from the TCT.

Finest Oxford English, where you'll have to have the ability to read between invisible lines.

So an educational degree conducted in Tagalog qualifies you, right?-wai2.gif

Edited by sirchai

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<script type='text/javascript'>window.mod_pagespeed_start = Number(new Date());</script>

As it's a BA and not a B.Ed., I don't think it will be considered to be an educational degree. I have a B.A. in TEFL and I was refused a Teachers License as I do not hold a B.Ed.

Sad to hear that they'd refused your TL.

I wanted to go for a Master's in English on weekends, which would have taken my weekends for about three years at Rajabhat Ubon R.

But that's not even considered to receive the TL by the TCT in Bangkok. Do these guys at the TCT actually know what pedagogy means?

Unfortunately, it seems that the word pedagogy isn't widely used in the English language,It's usually called Social education.

And pedagogy is a part of education.

Whatever they want to see, don't you think that 10 years of teaching English in Thailand doesn't qualify somebody who doesn't even have a BA?

So let's play with BA's in social education and B in education. You should read the e-mails, I've received from the TCT.

Finest Oxford English, where you'll have to have the ability to read between invisible lines.

So an educational degree conducted in Tagalog qualifies you, right?-wai2.gif alt=wai2.gif width=20 height=20>

If you speak Tagalog, and it's from an accredited institution, yes.

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All of the Degrees that I have seen from the Philippines are in both English and Tagalog. The transcripts are in English.

I doubt that your degree would be accepted. I know of someone with a Master's Degree in Educational Psychology and that didn't qualify for a TL.

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I honestly believe that this requirement for a B.Ed was a brain-child of some fat cat in the MOE who thought they could make money by squeezing the farang teachers to attend, just the same as the culture courses. It has fallen flat on its face and now they are not evening running the courses regulary or at all. The number of native speakers are disappearing rapidly and the void is being filled with people who speak it as a 2nd or 3rd language. It's so sad to see and only makes you wonder what will come of the future generation of Thai's trying to intergrate with the rest of the western world when they are still unable to communicate with it. Well done to the Fat cat and the MOE and the TCT!! Bravo for messing it all up out of greed and ignorance!

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<script type='text/javascript'>window.mod_pagespeed_start = Number(new Date());</script>

As it's a BA and not a B.Ed., I don't think it will be considered to be an educational degree. I have a B.A. in TEFL and I was refused a Teachers License as I do not hold a B.Ed.

Sad to hear that they'd refused your TL.

I wanted to go for a Master's in English on weekends, which would have taken my weekends for about three years at Rajabhat Ubon R.

But that's not even considered to receive the TL by the TCT in Bangkok. Do these guys at the TCT actually know what pedagogy means?

Unfortunately, it seems that the word pedagogy isn't widely used in the English language,It's usually called Social education.

And pedagogy is a part of education.

Whatever they want to see, don't you think that 10 years of teaching English in Thailand doesn't qualify somebody who doesn't even have a BA?

So let's play with BA's in social education and B in education. You should read the e-mails, I've received from the TCT.

Finest Oxford English, where you'll have to have the ability to read between invisible lines.

So an educational degree conducted in Tagalog qualifies you, right?-wai2.gif alt=wai2.gif width=20 height=20>

If you speak Tagalog, and it's from an accredited institution, yes.

I know that I know nothing.

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"So an educational degree conducted in Tagalog qualifies you, right?"

I think you're confused about the difference between the content of the degree and the language it's taught in.

"The number of native speakers are disappearing rapidly and the void is being filled with people who speak it as a 2nd or 3rd language"

And we all know how well the native speakers did.

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I don't really understand the term "social pedagogy." I would really have to look at the transcripts and see what courses you've really taken. If there are sufficient courses concerning syllabus construction, classroom management, testing, setting educational goals and arranging incentives, then it would begin to look like a degree in education to me.

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"So an educational degree conducted in Tagalog qualifies you, right?"

I think you're confused about the difference between the content of the degree and the language it's taught in.

"The number of native speakers are disappearing rapidly and the void is being filled with people who speak it as a 2nd or 3rd language"

And we all know how well the native speakers did.

To TerryLH, we will have to see if this goes full circle because I have already heard stories of students paying for the native speaker and not having one teach them. The parents who are "customers" are now starting to complain about this! The system is going to break down yet again and do a re-start. I am guessing you are either a non-native speaker or one who thinks that he has met the grade and that Thailand will not move the bench mark again for people who think they are safe..............Salut and good luck!

Edited by Eddy B

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"So an educational degree conducted in Tagalog qualifies you, right?"

I think you're confused about the difference between the content of the degree and the language it's taught in.

"The number of native speakers are disappearing rapidly and the void is being filled with people who speak it as a 2nd or 3rd language"

And we all know how well the native speakers did.

Nope, I'm not confused, was just trying to get some information about somebody who's got a fake degree from there. It’s almost impossible to get an answer.

What I'm trying to say is that the percentage of fake degree holders from the Philippines is pretty high, which might explain the often poor educational performance of some of them

And that's from a Filipino friend, who's working in a good position at a well- known university.

She really apologized to me that so many fellow countrymen of her are going this way. We started teaching together in 2005, and she speaks and writes very good English. And has a real teacher's license from her country.

.I can back my statement up, so I do not intent to make all of them to liars.Nor is it a Filipino bashing post.

With your last sentence, you threw all of them in one pot. There're many good guys, doing a great job, with or without degrees in education.

How much do you really know about English education in Thailand, the loss of face and the no- fail policy? Good week to all!!!---wai.gif

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If you are concerned about fake degrees, then hiring those with a Bachelor's Degree in Education and a TL from the Philippines is one way around it. There is a website which shows all those who have taken the Licensure exam. That one can't be faked.

The site also contains those from other professions such as nursing and engineering that are licensed.

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If you are concerned about fake degrees, then hiring those with a Bachelor's Degree in Education and a TL from the Philippines is one way around it. There is a website which shows all those who have taken the Licensure exam. That one can't be faked.

The site also contains those from other professions such as nursing and engineering that are licensed.

Totally agree.

From what I've found out, are more Asian cheaters from the Philippines in this system, than any other native English speaking, or European teachers in Thailand.

All five of the Filipinos at my former school had sent my Thai culture course certificate from 2008 to Khurusapa, a year ago, just put their names on it.\

Weird is that none of them had an idea where that course was, some were not even in Thailand when the course took place.

Now I'm talking about five cheaters at only one school. None of them speaks an acceptable English, nor-are they able to write an easy speech for a third grader..

. A check on three degrees doesn't look good for them ,as they haven't even got transcripts for them.

So they'd forged a "certifying letter" to "certify" their degrees and made that too unprofessional. One was signed in the year 202. Holy buffalo kee.-facepalm.gif

Edited by sirchai

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In fairness to the professional teachers from the Phillipines that are here my niece, who was taught by one for the last few years and has just entered M1 speaks nice sounding correctly pronounced english even if it has a Phillipine accent. At her new school she has 6 Foreign Teachers teaching her classes and most of them are NES. I can hope they will be just as professional.

Edited by harrry

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