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boomerangutang

What I'd like to see develop in Chiang Rai

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A decent library
The current one is small, drab and has few books. US libraries have magazines, e-books, meeting rooms, internet access (C.Rai's used to have internet, but no more).

Hiking and bicycling trails
There are many possibilities, not least; a trail skirting both sides of the Mae Kok river. If there was willingness and cooperation from some local Thai VIP's such trails could wind for miles. Most of the potential trail site is currently fallow and public property.

More and larger parks.
There's a large undeveloped site which already has big trees, which is unused. It's private property, owned by a rich Chinese-Thai family (who else). It has a defunct crematorium on it, so Thais probably think it's haunted. Even so, the city could buy it and have itself a 5 rai lovely natural park downtown. It's 2 Km south from Swensen's on east side of main road, on way to Central.

A 'Creative Center' for budding entrepreneurs.
Stocked with resources, tools and some raw materials. It could be a place where innovative people could develop tangible ideas and inventions, while interacting with like-minded others. Instead of having to invest in expensive tools and work space, some of that would be provided.

Dinosaurs
If there one place in the Chiang Rai region which has any fossils - of any plants or animals? How about a display of interesting rocks or stone tools? Perhaps Chiang Rai never had any interesting plants or animals. I'd find that hard to believe. Thais seem to think that the only history that's significant is about the Royals or Buddhism.

Animals

Could wild deer be re-introduced to rural Chiang Rai? They'd keep down some weeds, which currently grow up to 4 meters. How about monkeys? Granted, they're a pest, to some degree, but they were here a lot earlier than humans, and there is still abundant habitat (including wild fruit trees) for deer and monkeys - if people don't go and kill them - and that's a BIG IF. Another animal we rarely see much of: raptors (birds of prey). How about monitor lizards? There are some wild ones in southern Thailand, but none north of Hua Hin.

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I admire your passion and enthusiasm for your causes but I just can’t get behind most of them. I think people should be allowed to develop and follow their own path. Your path seems to be tantamount to swimming upstream in a raging river, but while not my cup of tea I am sure it has the potential to build character, so I wish you good luck.


Like so many other things libraries look to me like they may become relics of a bygone age. For younger generations every things seems to have gone digital and they usually have access to a school library if they really want or need one.


With so much open farmland and so many forests, streams, waterfalls and national parks within minutes of our small town I really don’t get your obsession with inner city parks. There is a plethora of places to hike and bike, nearby.


If you re-introduce wild animals they would no doubt eat someone’s crops and soon end up on someone’s dinner plate. People love to hunt, fish and scavenge the local forests for anything remotely edible.


My favorite raptor is the Pied Harrier but they are only here part of the year but there are Kites and others that I see on my rides. Maybe one doesn’t see them so often in town, I don’t know.


As for “Creative Centers” isn’t that what schools and universities are supposed to be?

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I admire your passion and enthusiasm for your causes but I just can’t get behind most of them. I think people should be allowed to develop and follow their own path. Your path seems to be tantamount to swimming upstream in a raging river, but while not my cup of tea I am sure it has the potential to build character, so I wish you good luck.

Like so many other things libraries look to me like they may become relics of a bygone age. For younger generations every things seems to have gone digital and they usually have access to a school library if they really want or need one.

Libraries can provide paper books while concurrently adapting to tech advances and still be inspiring places to peruse. If there aren't great books available to peruse, then youngsters won't have much appreciation for books. However, if such books are readily accessible, then they will be appreciated, by some at least.

With so much open farmland and so many forests, streams, waterfalls and national parks within minutes of our small town I really don’t get your obsession with inner city parks. There is a plethora of places to hike and bike, nearby.

Yes, there are some trails and semblances of natural habitat around town. There could be much more, both in town and in outlying areas. It wouldn't cost much to develop trails for hiking and bicycling. Many trails that are passable now are 'hit and miss' and a hiking enthusiast not already familiar with a trail would need a guide, probably paid.

If you re-introduce wild animals they would no doubt eat someone’s crops and soon end up on someone’s dinner plate. People love to hunt, fish and scavenge the local forests for anything remotely edible. That's the 'glass half empty' argument. The 'glass half full' is hoping people won't continue killing animals willy nilly, and instead appreciate wild animals being alive and sharing the region. Just because Thais are generally primitive, in their attitudes against 'wildness' (and spooked by raw nature) doesn't mean they can't change and/or can't come to appreciate raw nature as time rolls by. Even in built-up regions of the US, one can sometimes find flocks of geese foraging in a field, or a group of deer in a suburb. Ok, some cultured plants get eaten, but the trade-off - of having beautiful wild animals, unafraid, in the neighborhood, more than compensates.

My favorite raptor is the Pied Harrier but they are only here part of the year but there are Kites and others that I see on my rides. Maybe one doesn’t see them so often in town, I don’t know.

As for “Creative Centers” isn’t that what schools and universities are supposed to be?

In the US, such 'Creative Centers' (different appellation) are catching on and proving popular and productive. I rather doubt Thai U's are doing much more than taking money from students' parents - to get youngsters from entry point to exit - with a paper diploma in their hands. I'll be glad to be proved wrong.

The things I mentioned would not only improve 'quality of life' for Thai and farang and hill tribers residing here, but would also be a big boost for tourism. Since bringing in money is paramount, that's probably the way to showcase such improvements, when presenting such ideas to someone who could help implement them.

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I'm hoping for a Burger King. licklips.gif.pagespeed.ce.v-hsVd-Wpu.gif

Have it your way! I would be a regular, but it would have to have some parking available! A not overly large dirt bike and a sense of adventure will let you cover most of the area within a day's ride in about 2 years. I've followed many a road til it was dirt, then a trail, then a dead end path to a bamboo hut. The "mountains" north of the city (northern area of the province) are Chiangrai's natural blessing. The city, pretty much is what it is.

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A good library that could also be a venue for clubs like reading, chess, photography, art, etc. would be very welcome. I also would like to see the rail line extended from Chiang Mai to CR. I think it has to happen sometime.

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The rail line will be from Lampang to Chiang Rai city and Chiang Kong. This is in the budget that the army has approved. We could use a good highway between Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai.

We are suffering from lack of infrastructure based on the current rate of growth.

Anything new built downtown would be wasted money as you could never find a place to park. Better to move the government office buildings out of the center of town. New infrastructure should be built where there roads and parking places along with police enforcing the law.

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Some good suggestions by the OP, but I think the financial outlay would be significant. In "rich, developed" western countries, governments are cutting back on what most people consider basic necessities (art and music classes, pensions, welfare payments, etc.), so I think the authorities in CR might have some difficulties in funding these improvements.

Perhaps the local Chamber of Commerce can be asked for input.

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All the nature and human interest things are nice. However, I would like to see the army force the Chiang Rai Police to enforce traffic laws and control the traffic. You never see a policeman doing any of this. The traffic is getting worse by the day. On Sunday on the back road to the mall it was backed up for 1 hour.

They never stop building new bridges that are not needed. Would like to see a major effort to fill the road potholes and

switch from using cold patch tar and gravel to cement. The cold patch lasts for about 2 months.

People hate to go to the city because you can never find a place to park. The spaces are mostly taken up by employees of the business. If they would raise the parking rate to 25 Baht per hour for sure you could find a place to park.

Double parking on both sides of the roads makes it near impossible to pass so you have to stop and wait for a clearing. Why the police won't control the parking is far beyond me other than you never see them doing anything.

The current rate of population increase in Chiang Rai with 1 million Chinese across the river requires city planning, police work and citizens observing the rules of the road and laws. Running red lights, not stopping at stop signs and pulling out into a road without looking is a major cause of accidents.

These things are extremely important to the rapid growth of the population of Chiang Rai.

Ha ha, I was caught for one hour as well on Sunday on that same road. I had promised my daughters (who don't get to town much) a trip to Central. We couldn't get any where near it. They had some tuner car race thingy in the parking lot and 100's of cars circling the lot looking for a place to park. It was madness.

We went and got an Ice cream at Big C instead.

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