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French Bread Baking At Home


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The biggest problem for home maked breads in Thailand is:

Getting a good and fresh flour! Most of the flours in supermarkets are far to old and they just don't work.

Fresh yeast is not easy available, I am using dry yeast and it's fine. Nearly all of the big bread factories here are using it.

Bread improver: Should be used about 1-2% from the whole recipe amount(average bread recipe=

1Kg flour and 600ml water).

When I bake my bread at home I don't use it.

Start baking always with a high heat and with some steam, then gow down gradually with the heat.

I've stopped to make my own bread at home, to many friends found out and asked for it :o

You also can make braed with out any yeast:

Google for: berliner+sour, a bit more complicated but a great result if you like a german style bread.

Gerd

(Chef&Baker)

gerd...what kind of baking gear do you have (ie., oven). Anyone else care to describe their baking arrangement? I gots me one of them basic/standard Whirlpool cookers with the temp gauge in the oven window...hard to control the temperature...

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For 5 pieces of Barguette.

1 kg Flour

40 g fresh or dried yeast

3/8 l water ( lauwarm)

4 tsp salt

Flour and yeast and water mix together. Leave the yeast going for 15-20 mins. Then put salt and then knead. Sorry I can only describe in german. Leave again for 2.30 hours to get a double volume.

Cut into 5 pieces and making a barquette form, cover with piece of clothes to let it a volume again for 15 mins.

Put the temperature 220-250 c. Make a small cut on barguette form and spread with lauwarm water on the bread. Put a small cup with water in the oven and put the bread to bake for about 35-40 mins or if you see the bread has already nice color, then it is finished.

Bon Appertite !

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For 5 pieces of Barguette.

1 kg Flour

40 g fresh or dried yeast

3/8 l water ( lauwarm)

4 tsp salt

Flour and yeast and water mix together. Leave the yeast going for 15-20 mins. Then put salt and then knead. Sorry I can only describe in german. Leave again for 2.30 hours to get a double volume.

Cut into 5 pieces and making a barquette form, cover with piece of clothes to let it a volume again for 15 mins.

Put the temperature 220-250 c. Make a small cut on barguette form and spread with lauwarm water on the bread. Put a small cup with water in the oven and put the bread to bake for about 35-40 mins or if you see the bread has already nice color, then it is finished.

Bon Appertite !

With all the earlier talk of bread machines, Kathe finally mentioned kneading and rising.

The bread machine is only used for this process, not the actual baking.

IMO, a bread machine is an expensive tool for this.

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The biggest problem for home maked breads in Thailand is:

Getting a good and fresh flour! Most of the flours in supermarkets are far to old and they just don't work.

Fresh yeast is not easy available, I am using dry yeast and it's fine. Nearly all of the big bread factories here are using it.

Bread improver: Should be used about 1-2% from the whole recipe amount(average bread recipe=

1Kg flour and 600ml water).

When I bake my bread at home I don't use it.

Start baking always with a high heat and with some steam, then gow down gradually with the heat.

I've stopped to make my own bread at home, to many friends found out and asked for it :o

You also can make braed with out any yeast:

Google for: berliner+sour, a bit more complicated but a great result if you like a german style bread.

Gerd

(Chef&Baker)

gerd...what kind of baking gear do you have (ie., oven). Anyone else care to describe their baking arrangement? I gots me one of them basic/standard Whirlpool cookers with the temp gauge in the oven window...hard to control the temperature...

I am using two different oven but from Thailand(about 2000Baht each)available in Tesco, BigC etc.

I forgot to mention: When your bread is in the proving process do not forget to cover it with some plastic sheet otherwise the surface starts to dry out and cracks.

I am lucky to have some imported german bread mixes which are used in many hotels and bakery shops :D

Gerd

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Hi, I have been making bread in Thailand since I arrived here (two years ago) I brought with me from England a bread maker (cost 1750 bt) and have used Thai flour and dried yeast and never had a problem. I have never had to use bread improver, I don't see the advantage of using it.

As an ex-baker of twenty years I can tell you that even under ideal conditions French bread is very tricky to make! I would never attempt to make it at home! let us all know how you get on.

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Hi, I have been making bread in Thailand since I arrived here (two years ago) I brought with me from England a bread maker (cost 1750 bt) and have used Thai flour and dried yeast and never had a problem. I have never had to use bread improver, I don't see the advantage of using it.

As an ex-baker of twenty years I can tell you that even under ideal conditions French bread is very tricky to make! I would never attempt to make it at home! let us all know how you get on.

what?... 'don't try this at home?'...a number of posters on this thread have said that their efforts have resulted in a satisfactory product. In my original post I said that I was inspired to attempt the undertaking after watching bread production in a supermarket in HCMC under what appeared to be rudimentary circumstances (a tin device in the middle of the bakery section operated by a sweaty teenager loading gobs of dough after the fresh loaves fell out...a wonderful product)

what is needed is the weight of experience (I once attempted to make tortillas from surplus commodity corn meal in Eugene, Oregon in 1971 when on acid...an utter failure) an that is what I solicited on this thread...

please advise regarding the random pitfalls that one would encounter in an attempt to make homade french bread in rural thailand...otherwise, with respect I would suggest that your comment regarding the associated difficulties is without merit..

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what?... 'don't try this at home?'...a number of posters on this thread have said that their efforts have resulted in a satisfactory product. In my original post I said that I was inspired to attempt the undertaking after watching bread production in a supermarket in HCMC under what appeared to be rudimentary circumstances (a tin device in the middle of the bakery section operated by a sweaty teenager loading gobs of dough after the fresh loaves fell out...a wonderful product)

what is needed is the weight of experience (I once attempted to make tortillas from surplus commodity corn meal in Eugene, Oregon in 1971 when on acid...an utter failure) an that is what I solicited on this thread...

please advise regarding the random pitfalls that one would encounter in an attempt to make homade french bread in rural thailand...otherwise, with respect I would suggest that your comment regarding the associated difficulties is without merit..

Have you tried to make french bread yet? if not how can you say my comments are without merit. In reply to your question : note the following:

1. You need a basic understanding of how to make bread, watching 'sweaty teenagers' is not enough.

2. You will need real French flour (never seen it in Thailand).

3. You will need to learn how to hand mould.

4. You will need to know how to keep the dough at the prime temp.

5. You will need to how to get steam into you oven to get the crust.

Etc.etc.etc.... I did not mean my answer to discourage you in any way, just to warn you that it is not easy (ask any real baker) very best of luck!!!!!!!!!!! :o

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what?... 'don't try this at home?'...a number of posters on this thread have said that their efforts have resulted in a satisfactory product. In my original post I said that I was inspired to attempt the undertaking after watching bread production in a supermarket in HCMC under what appeared to be rudimentary circumstances (a tin device in the middle of the bakery section operated by a sweaty teenager loading gobs of dough after the fresh loaves fell out...a wonderful product)

what is needed is the weight of experience (I once attempted to make tortillas from surplus commodity corn meal in Eugene, Oregon in 1971 when on acid...an utter failure) an that is what I solicited on this thread...

please advise regarding the random pitfalls that one would encounter in an attempt to make homade french bread in rural thailand...otherwise, with respect I would suggest that your comment regarding the associated difficulties is without merit..

Have you tried to make french bread yet? if not how can you say my comments are without merit. In reply to your question : note the following:

1. You need a basic understanding of how to make bread, watching 'sweaty teenagers' is not enough.

2. You will need real French flour (never seen it in Thailand).

3. You will need to learn how to hand mould.

4. You will need to know how to keep the dough at the prime temp.

5. You will need to how to get steam into you oven to get the crust.

Etc.etc.etc.... I did not mean my answer to discourage you in any way, just to warn you that it is not easy (ask any real baker) very best of luck!!!!!!!!!!! :o

Thanks Wolf!

It's difficult to explain this procedure and you need a "feeling" to do this.

Bakers, Chefs etc. have learned it through many hard years and tears when we were a young apprentice.

But as Wolf said: Good luck!

Gerd

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what?... 'don't try this at home?'...a number of posters on this thread have said that their efforts have resulted in a satisfactory product. In my original post I said that I was inspired to attempt the undertaking after watching bread production in a supermarket in HCMC under what appeared to be rudimentary circumstances (a tin device in the middle of the bakery section operated by a sweaty teenager loading gobs of dough after the fresh loaves fell out...a wonderful product)

what is needed is the weight of experience (I once attempted to make tortillas from surplus commodity corn meal in Eugene, Oregon in 1971 when on acid...an utter failure) an that is what I solicited on this thread...

please advise regarding the random pitfalls that one would encounter in an attempt to make homade french bread in rural thailand...otherwise, with respect I would suggest that your comment regarding the associated difficulties is without merit..

Have you tried to make french bread yet? if not how can you say my comments are without merit. In reply to your question : note the following:

1. You need a basic understanding of how to make bread, watching 'sweaty teenagers' is not enough.

2. You will need real French flour (never seen it in Thailand).

3. You will need to learn how to hand mould.

4. You will need to know how to keep the dough at the prime temp.

5. You will need to how to get steam into you oven to get the crust.

Etc.etc.etc.... I did not mean my answer to discourage you in any way, just to warn you that it is not easy (ask any real baker) very best of luck!!!!!!!!!!! :o

You're certainly right about your points.....honestly , to get it a nice French Bread you need to improvise a lot when doing at home....Home appliances and Commercial Appliances are just not the same. It certainly needs the right amount of kneading with the right Shaping Technique too. This is specially needed as this is "strengthening" the Dough (makes the Gluten do what it is supposed to do - providing strenght).

About Flour . I have been doing French Bread with all kind of Flours. Naturally the french Flours were best , but you can get along and make Baguettes with German Flours, Dutch.....you will find some good flours suitable for Baguettes in many Countries(some Countries it just isn't poossible to find good flours though). Having done my baking on Cruise Vessels i can sing you a song about the variances of the Flour qualities. When Flour has questionable qualit ...thats when Bread Improver comes in handy.

Regardless, i do believe that some People do make decent baguettes at home....and those who aren't there yet. Don't give up trying , it'll come right one day.

I do certainly encourage Homebaking....it is possible to make decent French Bread at home , just need to get the swing of it ,

good luck,

rcm :D

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what?... 'don't try this at home?'...a number of posters on this thread have said that their efforts have resulted in a satisfactory product. In my original post I said that I was inspired to attempt the undertaking after watching bread production in a supermarket in HCMC under what appeared to be rudimentary circumstances (a tin device in the middle of the bakery section operated by a sweaty teenager loading gobs of dough after the fresh loaves fell out...a wonderful product)

what is needed is the weight of experience (I once attempted to make tortillas from surplus commodity corn meal in Eugene, Oregon in 1971 when on acid...an utter failure) an that is what I solicited on this thread...

please advise regarding the random pitfalls that one would encounter in an attempt to make homade french bread in rural thailand...otherwise, with respect I would suggest that your comment regarding the associated difficulties is without merit..

Have you tried to make french bread yet? if not how can you say my comments are without merit. In reply to your question : note the following:

1. You need a basic understanding of how to make bread, watching 'sweaty teenagers' is not enough.

2. You will need real French flour (never seen it in Thailand).

3. You will need to learn how to hand mould.

4. You will need to know how to keep the dough at the prime temp.

5. You will need to how to get steam into you oven to get the crust.

Etc.etc.etc.... I did not mean my answer to discourage you in any way, just to warn you that it is not easy (ask any real baker) very best of luck!!!!!!!!!!! :o

You're certainly right about your points.....honestly , to get it a nice French Bread you need to improvise a lot when doing at home....Home appliances and Commercial Appliances are just not the same. It certainly needs the right amount of kneading with the right Shaping Technique too. This is specially needed as this is "strengthening" the Dough (makes the Gluten do what it is supposed to do - providing strenght).

About Flour . I have been doing French Bread with all kind of Flours. Naturally the french Flours were best , but you can get along and make Baguettes with German Flours, Dutch.....you will find some good flours suitable for Baguettes in many Countries(some Countries it just isn't poossible to find good flours though). Having done my baking on Cruise Vessels i can sing you a song about the variances of the Flour qualities. When Flour has questionable qualit ...thats when Bread Improver comes in handy.

Regardless, i do believe that some People do make decent baguettes at home....and those who aren't there yet. Don't give up trying , it'll come right one day.

I do certainly encourage Homebaking....it is possible to make decent French Bread at home , just need to get the swing of it ,

good luck,

rcm :D

well, indeed...I hadn't realized that there was a 'flour' question. Thailand not being a big bread consumer one would presume that the flour quality required for a good baguette may not be available. Here in VN where people eat bread there must be good flour available as the quality of bread is quite good...although I couldn't compare to France as I haven't been there in a while. After 6 years in the Gulf I'm more used to arabic bread which is a different product altogether.

to our respected bakers rcm, thaigerd and wolf359 what flour can you recommend when one attempts to make baguettes in Thailand keeping in mind the selection usually available at tescos, Carrefour, etc? How about Betty Crocker (to plug a national product as a patriotic American...)?

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I've baked bread in the US for over thirty years, and I don't know what "bread improver" is. I do add gluten to some recipes or when using whole grain flours. Is gluten the same thing as bread improvers?

Bread machines do the whole bread mixing, kneading, rising, and baking process automatically. They can't do French bread, though. The baguette loaf shape and the need for the steam in the oven aren't possible in a bread machine. They do make good white and wheat bread, and some have a cycle of 60 to 80 minutes for a loaf, as well as the full 2.5 to 3.5 hours for a full cycle.

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I've baked bread in the US for over thirty years, and I don't know what "bread improver" is. I do add gluten to some recipes or when using whole grain flours. Is gluten the same thing as bread improvers?

Bread machines do the whole bread mixing, kneading, rising, and baking process automatically. They can't do French bread, though. The baguette loaf shape and the need for the steam in the oven aren't possible in a bread machine. They do make good white and wheat bread, and some have a cycle of 60 to 80 minutes for a loaf, as well as the full 2.5 to 3.5 hours for a full cycle.

Hi there,

No, Gluten and Bread improver are not the same... The wording Bread Improver doesn't exist there(US). There is a variety of names available for "Bread Improver" (this starts with Bread Stabilizer... Dough conditioner..) , Gluten should only be added if the Flour doesn't have enough of it...too much turns the Baguette into something soft. and chewy - but Baguette should be crispy .... The US flour that i know (i mostly used the one from General mills but i have tried others too) has normally added Gluten already (just to mention one of the added things...), so if you try it without the extra Gluten you might even get a better result.

And you're right to make baguette in a Bread machine is impossible...the one thing you might want to try is the mixing the Dough in the Breadmaker and than you take the dough out and "do the handwork" . This is difficult to write about...better to show. It needs a good amount of "feeling" for this and also very important is the consistency of the Dough - too soft not good -too hard the same...

You can make decent Baguette without adding the Bread Improver ...the bread improver is often a good help to "equalize" problems that are caused due to bad flour quality or other possible problems.

As for the Baking you can do an artificial steam or so in your Oven...so you must imrovise there.

The best advise for Tutsiwarrior in regards of the flour, try to do mixtures of flour , high Gluten and bread Flour or mix whatever Brands you have available , you'll find the right mixture for sure. Just need to be patient and up for experiments.

keep trying and good luck,

rcm :o

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  • 1 month later...

I have been baking sourdough bread in a bread machine with just great results.

I make a 2 pound loaf.

The starter is dead easy-

In a non metal container put 1 cup of bread flour 1 cup of “warm” water” adds 1 packet of yeast “ I got tired of trying to do it the “natural way”. Cover with a cloth and let sit overnight.

In the first few hours it will start to bubble, this is good. You should very soon start to smell the sourdough.

Use this recipe as a basic sourdough recipe and you are good to go.

· 2 Cups of sponge (proofed starter)

· 3 Cups of unbleached flour “bread flour is just fine”

· 2 tablespoons of olive oil or softened margarine

· 4 teaspoons of sugar

· 2 teaspoons of salt

YOU CAN'T BUY BREAD THIS GOOD!

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I have been baking sourdough bread in a bread machine with just great results.

I make a 2 pound loaf.

The starter is dead easy-

In a non metal container put 1 cup of bread flour 1 cup of “warm” water” adds 1 packet of yeast “ I got tired of trying to do it the “natural way”. Cover with a cloth and let sit overnight.

In the first few hours it will start to bubble, this is good. You should very soon start to smell the sourdough.

Use this recipe as a basic sourdough recipe and you are good to go.

· 2 Cups of sponge (proofed starter)

· 3 Cups of unbleached flour “bread flour is just fine”

· 2 tablespoons of olive oil or softened margarine

· 4 teaspoons of sugar

· 2 teaspoons of salt

YOU CAN'T BUY BREAD THIS GOOD!

sounds good jc...can you use part of the old starter to begin a new batch?...and are you sure that 2 cups of starter are required for 3 cups of flour?...

man,...if I could make a nice sourdough inna machine I'd be in heaven...have that wonderful sourdough smell in the kitchen when the kids get home from school?...they would mow me down...

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