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10 restaurants demolished on Phuket’s Sai Kaew Beach


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Well write home about it as that certainly is what you're supposed to do. So far I see no big fish frying, only harassment of low income workers. As I've said before I do hope I'm wrong about the Junta, because if I'm right, it will lead to a very very bad situation.

I think, to date, the Mayor of Karon has been the biggest fish to go into the fry pan. It will be interesting to see just how "cooked" he gets. smile.png

If one is arrested, the next step is ensuring that both the prosecutors office, and the judiciary are clean. That is often not the case here. Here are some excerpts from international organization on the Thai judiciary. It appears to be highly compromised. How do you fix the system without addressing this?

Individual Corruption

According to the Human Rights Report 2013, the judiciary is subject to corruption. Thailand's judicial system functions at a very slow pace: Drawn-out procedures encourage the bribing of civil servants charged with overseeing regulations to speed up legal procedures, and such practices are reportedly common. Thailand´s Anti-Corruption Strategy 2010, released by the National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC), describes the judicial system as weak and continuously manipulated by influential people, such as the Thai mafia and politicians.

The Human Rights Report 2013 notes that the government provides free legal advice to the poor; however, the aid was intermittent and of low quality. In addition, there were NGO reports of instances where legal aid lawyers forced their clients to pay extra fees directly to them. According to human rights groups, the lack of progress in several high-profile cases involving alleged police and military abuse have diminished the public's trust in the justice system. Nevertheless, less than one fifth of respondents in the Global Corruption Barometer 2013 felt that the judiciary was corrupt/extremely corrupt.

Business Corruption

According to the Investment Climate Statement 2013, Thailand's judiciary enforces property and contract rights effectively. However, it should be mentioned that the legal process is very lengthy. Similarly, the Index of Economic Freedom 2014 notes that the judiciary generally enforces property and contractual rights but that it is vulnerable to political interference. On a positive note, enforcement of bankruptcy judgments has been eased and streamlined since 2004.

Litigants sometimes influence judgments through extra-legal means, including bribes. The Human Rights Report 2013states that even though the judiciary is generally considered independent, it is subject to corruption and outside influences. Companies need to be aware that decisions by foreign courts are not recognised in Thai courts and thus cannot be enforced. Therefore, disputes that need to be settled in court and recognised in Thailand have to go through the Thai justice system.

Political Corruption

Corruption and self-interested behaviour is found throughout the political and judicial systems. This is supported by theHuman Rights Report 2012, which reports that the judicial system lacks progress in tackling high-profile cases, such as police and military abuse of power. In addition, the Transformation Index 2012 also states that the judiciary is corrupt to a certain extent. On a positive note, according to Freedom in the World 2013, with the new Constitution of 2007, judicial independence is guaranteed and the independent Constitutional Court has been re-established.

Frequency

The World Bank & IFC: Doing Business 2014:

- On average, enforcing a commercial contract involves 36 procedures and takes 440 days at a cost of 15% of the contract value.

World Economic Forum: The Global Competitiveness Report 2013-2014:

- Business executives give the independence of the judiciary from influences of members of government, citizens or companies a score of 3.8 on a 7-point scale (1 being 'heavily influenced' and 7 'entirely independent').

- Business executives give the efficiency of the legal framework for private companies to settle disputes and challenge the legality of government actions and/or regulations a score of 3.9 and 3.5, respectively, on a 7-point scale (1 being 'extremely inefficient' and 7 'highly efficient').

Transparency International: Global Corruption Barometer 2013:

- Citizens perceive the judicial system to be somewhat corrupt, giving it a score of 2.5 on a 5-point scale (1 being 'not at all corrupt' and 5 'extremely corrupt').

- 18% of households surveyed believe the judiciary is either 'corrupt' or 'extremely corrupt'.

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Well write home about it as that certainly is what you're supposed to do. So far I see no big fish frying, only harassment of low income workers. As I've said before I do hope I'm wrong about the Junta, because if I'm right, it will lead to a very very bad situation.

I think, to date, the Mayor of Karon has been the biggest fish to go into the fry pan. It will be interesting to see just how "cooked" he gets. smile.png

If one is arrested, the next step is ensuring that both the prosecutors office, and the judiciary are clean. That is often not the case here. Here are some excerpts from international organization on the Thai judiciary. It appears to be highly compromised. How do you fix the system without addressing this?

Individual Corruption

According to the Human Rights Report 2013, the judiciary is subject to corruption. Thailand's judicial system functions at a very slow pace: Drawn-out procedures encourage the bribing of civil servants charged with overseeing regulations to speed up legal procedures, and such practices are reportedly common. Thailand´s Anti-Corruption Strategy 2010, released by the National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC), describes the judicial system as weak and continuously manipulated by influential people, such as the Thai mafia and politicians.

The Human Rights Report 2013 notes that the government provides free legal advice to the poor; however, the aid was intermittent and of low quality. In addition, there were NGO reports of instances where legal aid lawyers forced their clients to pay extra fees directly to them. According to human rights groups, the lack of progress in several high-profile cases involving alleged police and military abuse have diminished the public's trust in the justice system. Nevertheless, less than one fifth of respondents in the Global Corruption Barometer 2013 felt that the judiciary was corrupt/extremely corrupt.

Business Corruption

According to the Investment Climate Statement 2013, Thailand's judiciary enforces property and contract rights effectively. However, it should be mentioned that the legal process is very lengthy. Similarly, the Index of Economic Freedom 2014 notes that the judiciary generally enforces property and contractual rights but that it is vulnerable to political interference. On a positive note, enforcement of bankruptcy judgments has been eased and streamlined since 2004.

Litigants sometimes influence judgments through extra-legal means, including bribes. The Human Rights Report 2013states that even though the judiciary is generally considered independent, it is subject to corruption and outside influences. Companies need to be aware that decisions by foreign courts are not recognised in Thai courts and thus cannot be enforced. Therefore, disputes that need to be settled in court and recognised in Thailand have to go through the Thai justice system.

Political Corruption

Corruption and self-interested behaviour is found throughout the political and judicial systems. This is supported by theHuman Rights Report 2012, which reports that the judicial system lacks progress in tackling high-profile cases, such as police and military abuse of power. In addition, the Transformation Index 2012 also states that the judiciary is corrupt to a certain extent. On a positive note, according to Freedom in the World 2013, with the new Constitution of 2007, judicial independence is guaranteed and the independent Constitutional Court has been re-established.

Frequency

The World Bank & IFC: Doing Business 2014:

- On average, enforcing a commercial contract involves 36 procedures and takes 440 days at a cost of 15% of the contract value.

World Economic Forum: The Global Competitiveness Report 2013-2014:

- Business executives give the independence of the judiciary from influences of members of government, citizens or companies a score of 3.8 on a 7-point scale (1 being 'heavily influenced' and 7 'entirely independent').

- Business executives give the efficiency of the legal framework for private companies to settle disputes and challenge the legality of government actions and/or regulations a score of 3.9 and 3.5, respectively, on a 7-point scale (1 being 'extremely inefficient' and 7 'highly efficient').

Transparency International: Global Corruption Barometer 2013:

- Citizens perceive the judicial system to be somewhat corrupt, giving it a score of 2.5 on a 5-point scale (1 being 'not at all corrupt' and 5 'extremely corrupt').

- 18% of households surveyed believe the judiciary is either 'corrupt' or 'extremely corrupt'.

Well, that summarizes what we/Thailand are up against.... a task ("cleansing the system") of absolutely gigantic proportions which would require a hero of Mandela stature to succeed... It get's scary when you start thinking of the full picture... This is not going to be a walk in the park... GOOD LUCK (honestly)...

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That's an enormous photo Stuarty! Screwed up my browser display completely!!

Totally agree.

Chrome can handle it.....but Stuarty should have resized less generously

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You are cheering the Junta on, but from where I am sitting I just see the poor people wiped out.

Read the article, they say ALL of the beaches are now cleaned (this being the last) including Nai thon and Nai Yang.

Perhaps you don't even live in Thailand, but if you do take a drive to Nai Thon beach and have a look. The poor punters have been cleared off the beach, but the rich (bangkok owned) mega resorts are untouched. Have a look at the Pullman resort at the North end of the beach, they are trading on with total impunity, in fact they are still carrying further building works as I type. Have a look at the environmental disaster at the southern end of the beach on the mountainside, where just a few months back a half dozen bulldozers and hundreds of Burmese day labourers showed up and clear felled a whole mountainside of National Park...and NO ONE stopped them. Now on that same mountainside there is a collection of shockingly substandard cement structure which breach both the local height codes and slope codes. You will also notice that they have accelerated their building activity in the last few weeks. Oh and lets not forget White haven beach that tuned a public beach into a private enclave, or Trisara that did the same.

And that is just Nai Thon.

Perhaps Simon43 would like to chime in here to give his opinion about whether all of the illegal structures are now completely cleared from Nai Yang...

Believe me my friend , these people that like to look poor earn more than 100.000 / month and its not because people are poor they should allow them to open a shop on nature land and run business with no tax

Edited by Incobart
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That's an enormous photo Stuarty! Screwed up my browser display completely!!

Totally agree.

Chrome can handle it.....but Stuarty should have resized less generously

But completely distords the photo.

I'm sorry, a photo of this size is just way, way overdone. Just make it a thumbnail and let people click to enlarge f they like to see larger.

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A link to a large image has been removed, not all browsers correctly scale large images, please think of others when posting.

Why not use the Attach File function which places a thumbnail on the post and links to the full sized image if clicked on?

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Just cannot wait for them to start on Samui. My partner used to have a very lucrative massage berth employing 6 genuine masseurs in front of a Cheong Mon resort. Although they have never owned the beach, the resort owner wife charged my partner Bht 27000 per month to be there. After she found out that my partner had done a customer deal with a neighbouring 5 star resort, the woman demanded Bht 37000 per mth. My partner just worked the month out and "pulled the plug" Now there are two diffrent operators there, both paying Bht30000 mth to someone who does not own the beach ! Also much rubbish around the site which neither of the 3 women will clean up. My partner, a uni educated lady from Suratthani, was always very particular about cleaning and tidyness. The present masseurs just don't see rubbish. Just hope that the Generals boys chase these litterers away and the resort lady finds herself Bht 60000 mth in the red.

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Just cannot wait for them to start on Samui. My partner used to have a very lucrative massage berth employing 6 genuine masseurs in front of a Cheong Mon resort. Although they have never owned the beach, the resort owner wife charged my partner Bht 27000 per month to be there. After she found out that my partner had done a customer deal with a neighbouring 5 star resort, the woman demanded Bht 37000 per mth. My partner just worked the month out and "pulled the plug" Now there are two diffrent operators there, both paying Bht30000 mth to someone who does not own the beach ! Also much rubbish around the site which neither of the 3 women will clean up. My partner, a uni educated lady from Suratthani, was always very particular about cleaning and tidyness. The present masseurs just don't see rubbish. Just hope that the Generals boys chase these litterers away and the resort lady finds herself Bht 60000 mth in the red.

But isn't it the resort lady that should find the army on its way, not the massage ladies?

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Just cannot wait for them to start on Samui. My partner used to have a very lucrative massage berth employing 6 genuine masseurs in front of a Cheong Mon resort. Although they have never owned the beach, the resort owner wife charged my partner Bht 27000 per month to be there. After she found out that my partner had done a customer deal with a neighbouring 5 star resort, the woman demanded Bht 37000 per mth. My partner just worked the month out and "pulled the plug" Now there are two diffrent operators there, both paying Bht30000 mth to someone who does not own the beach ! Also much rubbish around the site which neither of the 3 women will clean up. My partner, a uni educated lady from Suratthani, was always very particular about cleaning and tidyness. The present masseurs just don't see rubbish. Just hope that the Generals boys chase these litterers away and the resort lady finds herself Bht 60000 mth in the red.

I guess we agree: Those should be busted, BIG TIME

But, unfortunately that's what many Thai regard as "smart business", most would not even understand what we are bitching about, for them it's totally normal. And, if the circumstance would allow, they (I don't say "everyone", but almost everyone...) would do EXACTLY the same, if they could... It's just how things are done here...

Edited by TTom911
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