Jump to content

10 restaurants demolished on Phuket’s Sai Kaew Beach


Recommended Posts

Good news ! The end of corruption continues its way ! As in national parks illegal houses built on lands owned by government. Without a chanote at your name you cannot pretend own a land ! Army progress to make Thailand a better country without that shit corruption !

Edited by Westaurel
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 67
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Let's not get sidetracked by that enormous photo!! My comment about it was not that serious...


Believe me my friend , these people that like to look poor earn more than 100.000 / month

I know the ones on NY beach who earn that sort of money. They drive the latest Fortuna down to their business in the morning and then hide their car where the tourists can't see it.

But living at NY since 2002, I haven't seen new Fortuna's by the bamboo restaurants.....

Anyway, I agree that ALL illegal structures should be removed from the beach, but so far I'm not seeing that principle in physical action.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done...

all those restaurants on public land has been operating paying bribes to corrupt police for decades, with no respect to the nature and public environment.

And you have evidence of this do you?

For those not familiar with this location, it's to the north of the Phuket Checkpoint, about half a kilometre before the Sarasin Bridge. There is absolutely nothing in the area, until you get close to the bridge. Between the road and the beach itself is perhaps only around 50 metres or so wide. From what I've seen when I've been there, none of the restaurants were on the beach itself, instead being under pine trees. It's not an area that would attract environmentall tourists as it's just a destination for day out visitors (almost wholly Thais) using the restaurants themselves.

Shame really that they've gone, perhaps would have been better to regularise whatever agreement (verbal, written or otherwise) and made these arrangements public. If the land is owned by the Treasury Department, does that make it outside the National Park?

They were all undoubtably family owned and operated, so that's 10 sets of locals without income, I would imagine in the region of 50 or so people.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done...

all those restaurants on public land has been operating paying bribes to corrupt police for decades, with no respect to the nature and public environment.

And you have evidence of this do you?

For those not familiar with this location, it's to the north of the Phuket Checkpoint, about half a kilometre before the Sarasin Bridge. There is absolutely nothing in the area, until you get close to the bridge. Between the road and the beach itself is perhaps only around 50 metres or so wide. From what I've seen when I've been there, none of the restaurants were on the beach itself, instead being under pine trees. It's not an area that would attract environmentall tourists as it's just a destination for day out visitors (almost wholly Thais) using the restaurants themselves.

Shame really that they've gone, perhaps would have been better to regularise whatever agreement (verbal, written or otherwise) and made these arrangements public. If the land is owned by the Treasury Department, does that make it outside the National Park?

They were all undoubtably family owned and operated, so that's 10 sets of locals without income, I would imagine in the region of 50 or so people.

Yep...just some low key Thai businesses catering to Thai customers. Pretty low environmental impact also as they were off the primary dune. And definitely no mafia on farang action at that site. There are no swimmers or beach goers there as it is far too dangerous with the rips and sandbanks from the flow out at the channel at Sarasin. It is way off the grid as far as the average tourist goes.

This is just more workaday Thai small business people disenfranchised by the Bangkok elite. Meanwhile the illegal Bangkok owned mega resorts such as Pullman trade on with impunity.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

<script type='text/javascript'>window.mod_pagespeed_start = Number(new Date());</script>

Well done...

all those restaurants on public land has been operating paying bribes to corrupt police for decades, with no respect to the nature and public environment.

And you have evidence of this do you?

For those not familiar with this location, it's to the north of the Phuket Checkpoint, about half a kilometre before the Sarasin Bridge. There is absolutely nothing in the area, until you get close to the bridge. Between the road and the beach itself is perhaps only around 50 metres or so wide. From what I've seen when I've been there, none of the restaurants were on the beach itself, instead being under pine trees. It's not an area that would attract environmentall tourists as it's just a destination for day out visitors (almost wholly Thais) using the restaurants themselves.

Shame really that they've gone, perhaps would have been better to regularise whatever agreement (verbal, written or otherwise) and made these arrangements public. If the land is owned by the Treasury Department, does that make it outside the National Park?

They were all undoubtably family owned and operated, so that's 10 sets of locals without income, I would imagine in the region of 50 or so people.

Yep...just some low key Thai businesses catering to Thai customers. Pretty low environmental impact also as they were off the primary dune. And definitely no mafia on farang action at that site. There are no swimmers or beach goers there as it is far too dangerous with the rips and sandbanks from the flow out at the channel at Sarasin. It is way off the grid as far as the average tourist goes.

This is just more workaday Thai small business people disenfranchised by the Bangkok elite. Meanwhile the illegal Bangkok owned mega resorts such as Pullman trade on with impunity.

That is the huge danger: chucking out the baby with the bath water.

Of course the majority totally agrees that things need to be cleaned up big time. The problem in this county is that the mess is so enormous and setting priorities and getting the balance right is close to impossible.

And they would have to come up with a "development plan" for those who now loose their livelihood. Just washing hands by taking an "we get it clean now" attitude without addressing the consequences is will have on local people who, kinda understandably, adjusted to this messy way of running Thai affairs, will only make people resist more and more as the "cleaning operation" progresses... Heroic operations lead all to often to the death of the patient on the operation table... I hope they understand that and have a good game plan.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

<script type='text/javascript'>window.mod_pagespeed_start = Number(new Date());</script>

Well done...

all those restaurants on public land has been operating paying bribes to corrupt police for decades, with no respect to the nature and public environment.

And you have evidence of this do you?

For those not familiar with this location, it's to the north of the Phuket Checkpoint, about half a kilometre before the Sarasin Bridge. There is absolutely nothing in the area, until you get close to the bridge. Between the road and the beach itself is perhaps only around 50 metres or so wide. From what I've seen when I've been there, none of the restaurants were on the beach itself, instead being under pine trees. It's not an area that would attract environmentall tourists as it's just a destination for day out visitors (almost wholly Thais) using the restaurants themselves.

Shame really that they've gone, perhaps would have been better to regularise whatever agreement (verbal, written or otherwise) and made these arrangements public. If the land is owned by the Treasury Department, does that make it outside the National Park?

They were all undoubtably family owned and operated, so that's 10 sets of locals without income, I would imagine in the region of 50 or so people.

Yep...just some low key Thai businesses catering to Thai customers. Pretty low environmental impact also as they were off the primary dune. And definitely no mafia on farang action at that site. There are no swimmers or beach goers there as it is far too dangerous with the rips and sandbanks from the flow out at the channel at Sarasin. It is way off the grid as far as the average tourist goes.

This is just more workaday Thai small business people disenfranchised by the Bangkok elite. Meanwhile the illegal Bangkok owned mega resorts such as Pullman trade on with impunity.

That is the huge danger: chucking out the baby with the bath water.

Of course the majority totally agrees that things need to be cleaned up big time. The problem in this county is that the mess is so enormous and setting priorities and getting the balance right is close to impossible.

And they would have to come up with a "development plan" for those who now loose their livelihood. Just washing hands by taking an "we get it clean now" attitude without addressing the consequences is will have on local people who, kinda understandably, adjusted to this messy way of running Thai affairs, will only make people resist more and more as the "cleaning operation" progresses... Heroic operations lead all to often to the death of the patient on the operation table... I hope they understand that and have a good game plan.....

A "good" plan for Phuket would have started with the removal of the huge mega resorts that are built on national park land. An effective manager always puts the most difficult tasks at the top of his to do list.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A "good" plan for Phuket would have started with the removal of the huge mega resorts that are built on national park land. An effective manager always puts the most difficult tasks at the top of his to do list.

be real, in many cases "demolition" is not a practical option (even though it of course needs to be considered and assessed on a case by case basis).

Get a fast track court in place, with good resources, to check "the big guy", confiscate assets where public resources have been misused and put the abusers in jail. During the process, assign a caretaker manager and auction off to new owners where demolition is too expensive, kills to many jobs or take too long.

And let the auction profit flow back into the community for improvements and job creation !!!

We can't turn back the clock everywhere. But this way the illegal is turned legal, a new owner gets a clean start and the money helps to develop the community.

Prove that this works in top-priority "hot spots / pilot areas" where maximum efforts are made "to get this right", learn along the way and then roll that out that concept across the island (and Thailand for that matter).

As hard/difficult as it is: if too many peoples lives will be destroyed then they will not follow the "cleaning path". And that is of course that the ex-big shots are waiting for....

Edited by TTom911
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done...

all those restaurants on public land has been operating paying bribes to corrupt police for decades, with no respect to the nature and public environment.

And you have evidence of this do you?

For those not familiar with this location, it's to the north of the Phuket Checkpoint, about half a kilometre before the Sarasin Bridge. There is absolutely nothing in the area, until you get close to the bridge. Between the road and the beach itself is perhaps only around 50 metres or so wide. From what I've seen when I've been there, none of the restaurants were on the beach itself, instead being under pine trees. It's not an area that would attract environmentall tourists as it's just a destination for day out visitors (almost wholly Thais) using the restaurants themselves.

Shame really that they've gone, perhaps would have been better to regularise whatever agreement (verbal, written or otherwise) and made these arrangements public. If the land is owned by the Treasury Department, does that make it outside the National Park?

They were all undoubtably family owned and operated, so that's 10 sets of locals without income, I would imagine in the region of 50 or so people.

The situation is exactly as Pagallim describes. I am very familiar with it, because for a long time when going back to Khao Lak from Phuket, I always stopped off there for a soft drink, it is right before the bridge to Phangnga. All the restaurants there are simple wood/straw/bamboo constructions that don't encroach on the beach, and the vast majority of the customers are Thais.

Sure, they might be on public land, but on a tiny sliver of land between the road and the beach, which could in no way be interesting for biologists or nature lovers, no matter what trees they might plant.

Those restaurants have been there for a very long time without being challenged by the authorities. It is a universal legal principle that rights can be acquired by customary law, and in most legal systems an order to pull down these places wouldn't hold up in court.

I would be sorry to see them go, purely a loss not compensated by anything positive.

Edited by keestha
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done...

all those restaurants on public land has been operating paying bribes to corrupt police for decades, with no respect to the nature and public environment.

And you have evidence of this do you?

For those not familiar with this location, it's to the north of the Phuket Checkpoint, about half a kilometre before the Sarasin Bridge. There is absolutely nothing in the area, until you get close to the bridge. Between the road and the beach itself is perhaps only around 50 metres or so wide. From what I've seen when I've been there, none of the restaurants were on the beach itself, instead being under pine trees. It's not an area that would attract environmentall tourists as it's just a destination for day out visitors (almost wholly Thais) using the restaurants themselves.

Shame really that they've gone, perhaps would have been better to regularise whatever agreement (verbal, written or otherwise) and made these arrangements public. If the land is owned by the Treasury Department, does that make it outside the National Park?

They were all undoubtably family owned and operated, so that's 10 sets of locals without income, I would imagine in the region of 50 or so people.

The situation is exactly as Pagallim describes. I am very familiar with it, because for a long time when going back to Khao Lak from Phuket, I always stopped off there for a soft drink, it is right before the bridge to Phangnga. All the restaurants there are simple wood/straw/bamboo constructions that don't encroach on the beach, and the vast majority of the customers are Thais.

Sure, they might be on public land, but on a tiny sliver of land between the road and the beach, which could in no way be interesting for biologists or nature lovers, no matter what trees they might plant.

Those restaurants have been there for a very long time without being challenged by the authorities. It is a universal legal principle that rights can be acquired by customary law, and in most legal systems an order to pull down these places wouldn't hold up in court.

I would be sorry to see them go, purely a loss not compensated by anything positive.

Nature lovers dont have jungle deer or armadillo on their menu. Dont worry about the families because most of them have also other good jobs such as policeman.........

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done...

all those restaurants on public land has been operating paying bribes to corrupt police for decades, with no respect to the nature and public environment.

And you have evidence of this do you?

For those not familiar with this location, it's to the north of the Phuket Checkpoint, about half a kilometre before the Sarasin Bridge. There is absolutely nothing in the area, until you get close to the bridge. Between the road and the beach itself is perhaps only around 50 metres or so wide. From what I've seen when I've been there, none of the restaurants were on the beach itself, instead being under pine trees. It's not an area that would attract environmentall tourists as it's just a destination for day out visitors (almost wholly Thais) using the restaurants themselves.

Shame really that they've gone, perhaps would have been better to regularise whatever agreement (verbal, written or otherwise) and made these arrangements public. If the land is owned by the Treasury Department, does that make it outside the National Park?

They were all undoubtably family owned and operated, so that's 10 sets of locals without income, I would imagine in the region of 50 or so people.

The situation is exactly as Pagallim describes. I am very familiar with it, because for a long time when going back to Khao Lak from Phuket, I always stopped off there for a soft drink, it is right before the bridge to Phangnga. All the restaurants there are simple wood/straw/bamboo constructions that don't encroach on the beach, and the vast majority of the customers are Thais.

Sure, they might be on public land, but on a tiny sliver of land between the road and the beach, which could in no way be interesting for biologists or nature lovers, no matter what trees they might plant.

Those restaurants have been there for a very long time without being challenged by the authorities. It is a universal legal principle that rights can be acquired by customary law, and in most legal systems an order to pull down these places wouldn't hold up in court.

I would be sorry to see them go, purely a loss not compensated by anything positive.

Nature lovers dont have jungle deer or armadillo on their menu. Dont worry about the families because most of them have also other good jobs such as policeman.........

Bit of a sad post from you (what do Deer or Armadillo to do with this location?). Virtually all the police on location at the Checkpoint live in barracks there.

This area is virtually wholly long time Phuket/Phang Nga natives, and amongst the most accommodating and genuinely friendly people on the island.

Sent from my GT-I9500 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Bulldozer is talking about White Beach Resort which is half way between Nai Thon and Trisara. A year ago there was huge excavation above it on the hill which caused massive wash down when it rained. You can still see the sand bags by the road. The excavations have stopped but the scar is enormous. Bulldozer asks many good questions. There are many anomalies. Take Layan. Most of the bamboo structures have gone but Reggae Bar still operating. And Nikki Beach beach club? That's only been affected by the gales and sea spray.

Nikki Breach is on private land, IMO it is over height, as it is Zone 1 with a 6 meter restriction, ( and loudly obnoxious) but will it be forced to lop off the top 10 meters or so? Not likely, just like it's not likely Lotus Restaurant in the middle of Bang Tao will be forced to demolish either, because these are WEALTHY Thai owned businesses.

I've heard Catch at Surin used as an example of rich getting their businesses knocked down or really just the patio on the beach, but that is foreigner owned, along with parent co, American owned under Amity, Twin Palms.

It really is a war on the poor. I just wrote in another thread it seems if you want to incite unrest, and political instability, this is a good way to do it. Meanwhile, right on plan, legion of expats are writing home about it all "Thailand is changed.."singing the praises of a dictatorship.

Oh man I do hope I'm wrong... but I am very glad to be leaving.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to be clear, I've posted ( along with others) specifically abouut these particular 10 restaurants located to the north of Mai Khao, , approximately 1km south of Sarasin Bridge.

Sent from my GT-I9500 using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sigh... I am sooooo tired of reading posts from numpties who know nothing of Phuket or of the real facts.

Lets take Max, the young Thai lad who built up the Go Surfing Clubhouse at Kamala that comprised of a bamboo bar, and a rack with a few surfboards for rent. Max lost his immediate family in the Tsunami. He managed to struggle on alone working as a beach boy and built a small (and low environmental impact) business on the beach. His high season is right now, the monsoon low season as that is the only time there are waves at Kamala. However, right at the start of his high season, the Junta arrived and a week later tore down his business and home. No time for forward planning, job transition, or relocation. Max lost everything, his business, his home, even his identity.

Max's story is just one of many other similar ones amongst the beach vendors, and yet the Bangkok owned illegal mega resorts such as the Pullman at the North end of Nai Thon are trading on with impunity. In fact they are currently working overtime on further additional construction.

With any big job or project, an effective manager will always tackle the most difficult tasks first. Here on Phuket that meant removing the big illegal developments such as Trisara, Pullam, Bliss etc. However, all that has been done so far is to tear down some bamboo and destroy the lives of the poor people. Perhaps it is just poor management on behalf of the Junta. Or perhaps it is more sinister. Rember, the Bangkok elite are now in control of Phuket.

If the Junta does not deal with the big (and rich) criminals that have major illegal developments along the west coast, they should expect civil unrest from the disenfranchised beachside vendors.

However, my guess is that it will be business as usual for the rich...and the poor will get poorer...

That's so sad story about Max who lost his income which he based on 10 years after the tsunami, over the land he 'borrowed' from the ordinary people around him. So sad.

But did you ever thought about his friend Xam, who decided to educate himself and got an degree with engineering. Xam was the guy who decided not to use other people's assets to get himself rich over the years.

Xam's life was not easy. He had to study hard, eat poor food and did not have time nor money to have parties with his friends. He had a goal to graduate, to get a better life afterwards.

Xam managed to find the love of his life while studying, not uncommon as there were similar minds around. Xam stayed happy, quite unlike Max who was expecting everybody to respect him for his power and wealth.

Xam might be at this moment one of the guys who are trying to get Thailand back to the state it should be. Should Xam be fair to his old friend who did not study, but used the common wealth to improve his life?

Link to post
Share on other sites

You are cheering the Junta on, but from where I am sitting I just see the poor people wiped out.

Read the article, they say ALL of the beaches are now cleaned (this being the last) including Nai thon and Nai Yang.

Perhaps you don't even live in Thailand, but if you do take a drive to Nai Thon beach and have a look. The poor punters have been cleared off the beach, but the rich (bangkok owned) mega resorts are untouched. Have a look at the Pullman resort at the North end of the beach, they are trading on with total impunity, in fact they are still carrying further building works as I type. Have a look at the environmental disaster at the southern end of the beach on the mountainside, where just a few months back a half dozen bulldozers and hundreds of Burmese day labourers showed up and clear felled a whole mountainside of National Park...and NO ONE stopped them. Now on that same mountainside there is a collection of shockingly substandard cement structure which breach both the local height codes and slope codes. You will also notice that they have accelerated their building activity in the last few weeks. Oh and lets not forget White haven beach that tuned a public beach into a private enclave, or Trisara that did the same.

And that is just Nai Thon.

Perhaps Simon43 would like to chime in here to give his opinion about whether all of the illegal structures are now completely cleared from Nai Yang...

Believe me my friend , these people that like to look poor earn more than 100.000 / month and its not because people are poor they should allow them to open a shop on nature land and run business with no tax

Sigh... I am sooooo tired of reading posts from numpties who know nothing of Phuket or of the real facts.

<snip>

Pot, kettle, black comes to mind!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...