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Neeranam

Would You Send Your Kids To An EP?

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I would never even consider sending my kids to a Thai English program.

I'm guessing you are well off or you don't live in Thailand.

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As someone mentioned 'checkout the EP program'. Do that carefully. I know a couple of schools that have started EP programs and they have no idea what they are doing. The staff is reasonably good and competent, but they keep changing the job description and it has a negative impact on the staff, and that affects learning. They do know how to collect the additional money, however.

I have a feeling the schools will get their act together, but it is going to take some time. The main advantage right now is that the students do get a lot of English and it has a good student to staff ratio.

The Thai admin, however, think that they can wave a magic wand and make a new program happen. It really doesn't happen quite that way.

Not all EP's have high turnover. Right now in my office there are 5 teachers. We have over 50 years teaching experience, mostly accrued in our current school. I'd suggest there are good and not-so-good EP's around. Most of the better schools will be in BK or surrounds.

There's also some good ones in Chiang Mai.

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I would never even consider sending my kids to a Thai English program.

I'm guessing you are well off or you don't live in Thailand.

Ha. I taught in Thailand at one of the better EP's I'd say. It was a joke. I would not send my kid anywhere near the place unless I wanted their education to be about how to disrespect teachers and get away with it etc etc etc.

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I would never even consider sending my kids to a Thai English program.

I'm guessing you are well off or you don't live in Thailand.

Ha. I taught in Thailand at one of the better EP's I'd say. It was a joke. I would not send my kid anywhere near the place unless I wanted their education to be about how to disrespect teachers and get away with it etc etc etc.

I taught in a school on Convent Road, which was one of the most prestigious in Thailand - Thaksin's daughter was there! The first year they started their English program with P1-3.

There were were 2 chronic alcoholics there who always taking time off sick, one Cockney guy who left school at 15 who asked me once how to spell 'sugar', who subsequently went on to smuggle large quantities of drugs for the guy who owned Pat Pong, where many of the teachers hung out(including me smile.png). There were 3 Filipinos, 2 Germans, an American who boasted about his Khao San Road Masters. There was an Scottish criminal who nobody understood, apart from me. He had moved to Thailand racking up a debt on credit cards for 100k GBP. Actually a good, friendly bunch but very sad for the little girls studying there. There were two females who smoked dope and could drink most men under the table. I would be very surprised if was in the top 20 schools in Bangkok these days, unless they really cleaned u their act.

Name and reputation mean very little.

Edited by Neeranam

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I would never even consider sending my kids to a Thai English program.

I'm guessing you are well off or you don't live in Thailand.

Ha. I taught in Thailand at one of the better EP's I'd say. It was a joke. I would not send my kid anywhere near the place unless I wanted their education to be about how to disrespect teachers and get away with it etc etc etc.

I taught in a school on Convent Road, which was one of the most prestigious in Thailand - Thaksin's daughter was there! The first year they started their English program with P1-3.

There were were 2 chronic alcoholics there who always taking time off sick, one Cockney guy who left school at 15 who asked me once how to spell 'sugar', who subsequently went on to smuggle large quantities of drugs for the guy who owned Pat Pong, where many of the teachers hung out(including me smile.png). There were 3 Filipinos, 2 Germans, an American who boasted about his Khao San Road Masters. There was an Scottish criminal who nobody understood, apart from me. He had moved to Thailand racking up a debt on credit cards for 100k GBP. Actually a good, friendly bunch but very sad for the little girls studying there. There were two females who smoked dope and could drink most men under the table. I would be very surprised if was in the top 20 schools in Bangkok these days, unless they really cleaned u their act.

Name and reputation mean very little.

I know the school, and yes it is a very typical EP program.... meaning it is scary. In fairness there are much better options, but not too much better. The only improvements you will see are superficial. The teaching is really no better at the EP programs that top the "convent school," and the reason is because the teachers are not given the authority to do any sort of real discipline. The students always win. The Thai teachers also show disdain for the foreign teachers, which I am sure you experienced, and student behavior follows suit. It is fine by me, but it is their school system and it is a complete abomination, so do what you may.

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I am a teacher in a mini EP, and my son goes to my school. He is 8 years old and is educated in the Thai system, not the EP. His English is fluent so he has no need for English exposure. I would personally put any child I had in the "ordinary" classes, and pay for English tuition out of school. I have worked in 3 similar programmes that have all been the same, that is, run as a business.

The students I have encountered learn that they will get great grades no matter what, and this makes them lazy in class. I submit grades that reflect the tests, yet I have students who have scored 10% receiving a grade 4. A good EP will have students that fail, so ask about pass rates One home room teacher where I am at the moment demanded at least 80% for all the students in her class, if you see something like this run for the hills.

If you are going to put a child in an EP check on class sizes, and look for a max of 30 students. Make an impromptu visit and sit in on a class run by a native speaker. Check out the homeroom teacher and the co-teacher and make sure they can communicate with you in English. The facilities to me are not the most important thing (or my son would be in an EP), but multimedia lessons are more interesting and set context much easier for students, so look for them and ask how they are used.

It is my opinion that the basic EP is a way to make money for a school, and for parents to appear hi-so. There is no doubt that your kids will be hobnobbing with other "rich" kids and is thus great for networking. However, I think to suggest that the standard of teaching in an EP is different to that in a general programme is wrong. It depends who is teaching and the motivations that the students have.

By the way, The Mini EP I work for is no where near the worst, and is actually the best, I have worked in (as is the school).

If you are serious about education send your kids to a school that follows a foreign curriculum, or do a lot of home tutoring (as me and my wife do). Come the time for Matayom school, my boy will either be in a private school or I will be moving back home.

Can you please tell me where I can get the information and content about home tutoring?

Edited by billd766

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I am a teacher in a mini EP, and my son goes to my school. He is 8 years old and is educated in the Thai system, not the EP. His English is fluent so he has no need for English exposure. I would personally put any child I had in the "ordinary" classes, and pay for English tuition out of school. I have worked in 3 similar programmes that have all been the same, that is, run as a business.

The students I have encountered learn that they will get great grades no matter what, and this makes them lazy in class. I submit grades that reflect the tests, yet I have students who have scored 10% receiving a grade 4. A good EP will have students that fail, so ask about pass rates One home room teacher where I am at the moment demanded at least 80% for all the students in her class, if you see something like this run for the hills.

If you are going to put a child in an EP check on class sizes, and look for a max of 30 students. Make an impromptu visit and sit in on a class run by a native speaker. Check out the homeroom teacher and the co-teacher and make sure they can communicate with you in English. The facilities to me are not the most important thing (or my son would be in an EP), but multimedia lessons are more interesting and set context much easier for students, so look for them and ask how they are used.

It is my opinion that the basic EP is a way to make money for a school, and for parents to appear hi-so. There is no doubt that your kids will be hobnobbing with other "rich" kids and is thus great for networking. However, I think to suggest that the standard of teaching in an EP is different to that in a general programme is wrong. It depends who is teaching and the motivations that the students have.

By the way, The Mini EP I work for is no where near the worst, and is actually the best, I have worked in (as is the school).

If you are serious about education send your kids to a school that follows a foreign curriculum, or do a lot of home tutoring (as me and my wife do). Come the time for Matayom school, my boy will either be in a private school or I will be moving back home.

Can you please tell me where I can get the information and content about home tutoring?

There are home tutoring sites and forums all over the net.

I simply compliment what is being taught to my kids as I find it necessary. Though reinforcement is a great tool, I want my kids to have more quality time than Thai kids, so I don't teach everything in the curriculum to them. I concentrate on English using comprehension exercises as they need no conversation (both born in the UK), and comprehension covers reading, writing, new vocab, grammar, and understanding. I can teach maths to my kids age range easily (I have taught up to M6 .......without a.degree, and yes, that is too high for me to be totally competent), and I also teach science through everyday life and general conversation,concentrating on questions he has from school work when applicable. My one son is 8, the other 4, and I believe I can teach them until M4 in science (when it splits from general science into biology, chemistry, and physics)with what I know already from teaching and research, and maths (confidently) to M4 too.

As I said, I do not have a degree in science or maths, but I am confident while teaching both subjects (I am in a Prathom school at the moment). Whether, as a paying parent, I would want somebody like myself teaching my kids I am not sure. However, I know that my kids will not suffer from my teaching, and that their lessons will be more interesting than the rote learning that I have seen in science classes here.

Edited by nellyp

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I love this stuff, but it is more for high school students:

http://www.youtube.com/user/crashcourse

Bu there is loads of stuff out there. Even entire Home Schooling curriculum. Google is your friend.

Or Buddha? And Facebook.?

Edited by lostinisaan

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Sent both kids to private bilingual school for primary school. not govt EP and all in all quite happy.

Proper foreign teachers so it wasn't cheap but the kids are well up with fitting into school in UK. International is very hit and miss. Some are good and some are truly horrible.

EP in govt school. Can't say I know anyone who is universally happy with it.

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I sent my daughter to an EP because of financial constraints. She went on graduate from an English university. However, I doubt the teachers at her school were qualified as they said and they certainly didn't have degrees in their subject. She needed private tutoring. If I could turn back time, I would send her to a normal Thai program. The people who benefit in an EP are the directors and to some extent the teachers.

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.... even using American accent.

And what's wrong with an American accent? tongue.pngbiggrin.png

Nothing. It's a good thing :)

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.... even using American accent.

And what's wrong with an American accent? tongue.pngbiggrin.png

Nothing. It's a good thing smile.png

In america.

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Absolutely not...

I don't have kids yet, but I would certainly want my child/children to have a better quality, internationally recognised education from my home country than one that can be paid for and that they can't fail. I would take my kid back home to the UK for free education where they have to earn their place. They could continue to learn Thai from their mother and when the child is old enough, if he/she wants, we can come back to Thailand.

The refusal to acknowledge failure and/or stupidity is the main problem with the Thai education system... Nobody fails and stupid kids get lumped in the same class with the genuinely bright kids who actively try to learn, want to be there and actually deserve to be there through merit, not just daddies bank balance...

Many kids in my school are not in the EP, but have better understanding of the English language than kids that are... Those kids should be in EP on merit... but of course, hard work earns dick all in Thailand when money is involved...

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