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What Costs Are Involved In Becoming A Monk

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43 minutes ago, rockyysdt said:

Hi M.

 

You are fortunate.

 

The asking fee tells you that this isn't the place to invest your money and time.

 

Continue looking, and eventually you'll find a group whose focus aligns with the Buddha's teachings.

 

After all, this is your principal aim.

 

Good luck in your search.

-

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22 hours ago, Orton Rd said:

If they are not usually allowed to leave the Wats why do I see so many of them in the local central mall looking at phones every day?

Monks with less than 5 years in the monkhood are discouraged from going into town on their own.  Some temples are strict about this, some are not.  

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16 hours ago, rockyysdt said:

 

I understand what you're saying, however peace of mind is not the aim of the Buddha's teachings.

 

I remember attending regular Yoga classes.

After a set of challenging body movements and stretching we were then required to lie flat our backs and close the eyes and focus on breath.

The session went for 50 minutes followed by 5 minutes lying on the mat for meditation.

The teacher would then end the class by ringing a bell.

My state was so subtle that I had no awareness of how deep I had gone until the bell rang.

 

The Yoga had done its job, by totally relaxing the body and resulting in a deep steady breath.

Clarity of mind resulted.

 

My frustration would set it.

The Yoga prepared me for deep contemplation but the teacher ended the session.

Instead of the Yoga being the beginning of my practice, it was taught as the end of it.

 

The same with a solitary hike in the mountains.

It will bring a relatively calm and peaceful state.

However in can't in itself result in Awakening.

 

 

My understanding is that the reason for Monkhood is to provide an environment in which one can practice the Buddhas teachings full time.

This would include access to full time teacher/s and freedom from distractions by way of affirmation to adhere to rules (precepts).

 

I think, thousands of years ago, release from work, which would have involved long hours of heavy toil, would have been very important in order to free ones resources towards concentration and practice.

 

These days one has the option of setting up or joining dedicated retreats in which members are seriously devoted to practice.

This can be funded via a pension, savings, family or other) with access to countless sources of advice via the internet. A resource unheard of in the Buddhas time.

 

Alternatively the Monkhood can provide an original path.

The key here is to find a Sangha containing members who are dedicated to the path.

If one is lucky enough to have members who are Awakened then their influence would be immeasurable.

 

We need to remember that Monks are afflicted by the same poisons (greed, aversion, and delusion) as all of us.

 

There will always be many who will use the robes for personal gain.

Observers focus on this and tar all and the path with the same brush.

You are correct Rocky.  

"Alternatively the Monkhood can provide an original path.

The key here is to find a Sangha containing members who are dedicated to the path.

If one is lucky enough to have members who are Awakened then their influence would be immeasurable."

Dedicated teachers are getting harder and harder to find.  15 - 20 years ago there were quite a few around.  Now, they've mostly passed.  Wat Pah NanaChat is about the only Buddhist temple in Thailand I know of that still follows almost all of the Buddha's teachings.  And they have got very difficult to get into.  There are still a few of Ajahn Chah's students around who are now much older monks who are carrying on his teachings.  One in England, one in Australia, one in California and still one I know of in Thailand.  I'm talking about Farang monks.  There were several Thai monks I would have liked to have studied under, but my Thai was atrocious.  And now they are gone.  I'll destroy their names but here goes.  I'm sure you know who I'm talking about.  Luang Ta Boo Wah, Luang Phor Koon and the one from down South, you can find his books everywhere.  Forgot his name but was at his temple for a day once.  Kind of a heavy set guy with glasses.  I believe his temple still holds retreats.  I didn't stay a monk long enough to really be allowed to study with them.  And of course, there's the Thai language problem.  

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10 hours ago, khaowong1 said:

Dedicated teachers are getting harder and harder to find.  15 - 20 years ago there were quite a few around.  Now, they've mostly passed.  

 

Do you think this is the way Buddhism is going?

 

These days, more than ever, distractions are deeply invasive, and with instant access to the internet, extremely difficult to escape.

 

Reminds me of approaching the "event horizon" of a black hole.

 

Without Awakened ones will it be all over?

 

 

Edited by rockyysdt

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13 hours ago, rockyysdt said:

 

Do you think this is the way Buddhism is going?

 

These days, more than ever, distractions are deeply invasive, and with instant access to the internet, extremely difficult to escape.

 

Reminds me of approaching the "event horizon" of a black hole.

 

Without Awakened ones will it be all over?

 

 

I think this is the way Buddhism will go because of the internet.  Almost instant answers to questions and theories.  Very little personal interaction with dedicated teachers.  Until, maybe, another of the "Awakened" ones comes to light.  I really don't see any of those on the horizon.  

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14 hours ago, khaowong1 said:

I think this is the way Buddhism will go because of the internet.  Almost instant answers to questions and theories.  Very little personal interaction with dedicated teachers.  Until, maybe, another of the "Awakened" ones comes to light.  I really don't see any of those on the horizon.  

 

I don't know if you felt it K.

 

When I stayed on retreat at Wat Suan Mokkh I felt this indescribable deep feeling of (deep serenity does not capture it).

 

I'm thinking it comes from the many who stay here in dedicated group practice.

 

At this place rules are strictly enforced.

I've seen participants expelled for talking, amongst other indiscretions.

 

Can't say whether this aura is emanating from the current group of Monks, or from the power of retreatants in group meditation, or from Buddhadasa Bhikku's influence, or all three, but we definitely need more of it.

 

It's experiences like this which are difficult to recreate from reading data online.

Edited by rockyysdt

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10 hours ago, rockyysdt said:

 

I don't know if you felt it K.

 

When I stayed on retreat at Wat Suan Mokkh I felt this indescribable deep feeling of (deep serenity does not capture it).

 

I'm thinking it comes from the many who stay here in dedicated group practice.

 

At this place rules are strictly enforced.

I've seen participants expelled for talking, amongst other indiscretions.

 

Can't say whether this aura is emanating from the current group of Monks, or from the power of retreatants in group meditation, or from Buddhadasa Bhikku's influence, or all three, but we definitely need more of it.

 

It's experiences like this which are difficult to recreate from reading data online.

I agree.  I was only at Wat Suan Mokkh for a day with my abbot.  We were given kind of a tour.  Loved the place and most definitely felt something there also.  Buddhadasa Bhikku was one of my favorites.  Read almost all his books. I would have loved to meet him.  Don't know of any around now like him.  He was not well liked at his time for his stances on poverty and inequality.  Now he's a hero.  Did you know that when he was alive, there were no Buddha statues on his property?  He didn't want people worshiping his image, he wanted them to learn his teachings.  

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