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dereklev

Virus In Korat

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There are, as yet unconfirmed reports, of an unknown virus affecting young children in Korat and the surrounding area.

It has been suggested that it maybe be Dengue Fever, Meningitis or Enterovirus.

It is said that more than a week after it was first talked about that the local Doctors still have no idea of what the virus is.

There have been reports of several deaths in young children.

Can anyone shed any light on this??

Admin/Mods I have posted this in the Health Forum and the Isaan Forum in the hope of getting maximum coverage, There are a lot of very concerned parents of young kids up here, me included!! We would appreciate it if you could leave it in both Forums. Thanks

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Children don't die in numbers from Common Flu.

SO!

What do the children who have this " virus"complain of ? ( symptoms)

What signs of illness do they have?

Does any pyrexia ( high temperature) respond to aspirin/paracetamol and fluids +++?

In any case the patient with a headache vomiting ,fever, poor feeding or lethargy should be isolated, in hospital until diagnosed.

In the case of these and a stiff neck, menigitis should be suspected.

In the case of small children, who may not show all these symptoms immediately, assume menigitis AND TREAT AS until proved otherwise.

Is there a Public Health Dept in Korat and what are they doing about it? Are they arranging a mass vaccination programme in case?

Menigitis is highly contagious.

Treatment is IMMEDIATE Intra venous, benzyl penicillin 600mg for young children ( half for infants)

(Double for adults).

Some patients are sensitive to Penicillin and the Cefotaxime group are indicated.

An "information directory notice" ? dereklev

Let me know if you need further help.

Edited by Korat Correct

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There are, as yet unconfirmed reports, of an unknown virus affecting young children in Korat and the surrounding area.

It has been suggested that it maybe be Dengue Fever, Meningitis or Enterovirus.

It is said that more than a week after it was first talked about that the local Doctors still have no idea of what the virus is.

There have been reports of several deaths in young children.

Can anyone shed any light on this??

Admin/Mods I have posted this in the Health Forum and the Isaan Forum in the hope of getting maximum coverage, There are a lot of very concerned parents of young kids up here, me included!! We would appreciate it if you could leave it in both Forums. Thanks

I spoke to a friend at Maharat, and was told that the cases last week were not Dengue, it was a unknown and very potent enterovirus viral infection. It attacked the heart and lungs and brain within in 24 hours after the child's temperature started to to rise. She explained to me that this virus was very difficult to treat and caused death in children in all the cases that they have seen. There has been no more cases since last week. She said that it is very easy to prevent the children from getting the virus, as it spread through bodily fluid such as tears, saliver, feces and contaminated surfaces. It can also be passed by contaminated water supply too. Basically I was advised to improve hygiene in the home and minimize exposer to other possible ways of of contracting the virus. So I'm now putting my son in a sterile plastic bag.

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There was a virus here on Koh Phangan recently, my husband had it, symptoms were high fever, bad headache and aching body (no nausea). His temp was 41. He said, at one point, his body was shaking so hard, he could barely walk (presumably from the fever). He took paracetamol and the fever came down quite quickly.

He had his blood tested for dengue and malaria and tested neg for both.

My husband told me that a famous Thai actor was hospitalized with the same symptoms.

Oddly enough, two weeks before my husband was ill my nephew had the same symptoms in the US.

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Surely the main hospitals in Korat will know something.

As I said Lazykhao......

It is said that more than a week after it was first talked about that the local Doctors still have no idea of what the virus is.

...so clearly they don't.. :o

KC there are many posts on the KEC Information Directory website, I was just trying to widen the catchment area for responses.

The symptoms include Pyrexia (high temp), fever, dehydration etc.

This is a quote from 1st July by someone who works at one of the major govenment hospitals in Korat......

She said that there appears to be a new viral infection that has caused 4 deaths in her hospital and 3 deaths in non government hospitals. Parents are bringing their children into hospital with high temperatures and within 24 hours the virus has attacked the heart and lungs causing respiratory failure and death in 24 hours.

That is all I know as of now....

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It is said that more than a week after it was first talked about that the local Doctors still have no idea of what the virus is.

There appears to be a similar problem around here. Three children died near our village (half hour drive SW of Sisaket) a couple of weeks ago. I tried to ascertain the symptoms and told it was from mosquitos - I said Malaria? and was told "something like that"!

I don't have a lot of faith in the diagnostic abilities of hospitals around here - I've spent a fair amount of time visiting Sisaket hospital recently, a man was admitted to the ward we were in who my wife recognised as an old school friend. He had been transferred from Prang Khu with suspected heart attack. On diagnoses in Sisaket it was found to be TB. He was dead within a few hours and the bed occupied by a new victim - same linen and all!

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Actually korat correct is incorrect. Children do die from the flu.From the US CDC:

BACKGROUND: Although influenza is common among children, pediatric mortality related to laboratory-confirmed influenza has not been assessed nationally. METHODS: During the 2003-2004 influenza season, we requested that state health departments report any death associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza in a U.S. resident younger than 18 years of age. Case reports, medical records, and autopsy reports were reviewed, and available influenza-virus isolates were analyzed at the

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. RESULTS: One hundred fifty-three influenza-associated deaths among children were reported by 40 state health departments. The median age of the children was three years, and 96 of them (63 percent) were younger than five years old. Forty-seven of the children (31 percent) died outside a hospital setting, and 45 (29 percent) died within three days after the onset of illness. Bacterial coinfections were identified in 24 of the 102 children tested (24 percent). Thirty-three percent of the children had an underlying condition recognized to increase the risk of influenza-related complications, and 20 percent had other chronic conditions; 47 percent had previously been healthy. Chronic neurologic or neuromuscular conditions were present in one third. The mortality rate was highest among children younger than six months of age (0.88 per 100,000 children; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.52 to 1.39 per 100,000). CONCLUSIONS: A substantial number of influenza-associated deaths occurred among U.S. children during the 2003-2004 influenza season. High priority should be given to improvements in influenza-vaccine coverage and improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of influenza to reduce childhood mortality from influenza. Copyright 2005 Massachusetts Medical Society.

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I have just spoken to my son's paediatrician at the Ratchasima Thonbori hospital.

He confirmed that there is a potentially lethal virus in the Korat area.

He confirmed that they do not know what the virus is at present. He said it could be as long as 10-14 days before they knew for sure. Samples (?) of the virus have been sent to BKK and overseas for testing.

He said that at present they are treating the virus as an Enterovirus.

I asked what precautions I should take to protect my son and was told that isololation from other children was the surest way of protecting my son. He particular mentioned NOT taking my son to nursery, markets, shopping centres etc. He said that they believe the virus is passed by saliva and other bodily fluids and can also be transmitted through contaminated food and water.

Do not let your children share food and drink with others!!!

He repeated all he said to me in Thai for my wife..........whether she will listen or not is another thing!!!

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There are more than 70 Enteroviral infection types.

They are spread by oral to oral or faecal to oral routes

Incubation is 2-5 days

They are highly contagious

After ingestion of the infected material EV's are implanted in the alimentary tract ( nose to gut)

Specific antibodies may be detected in serum after 1 week.

Affects children under 10 years and Neotates are known to suffer myocardial problems.

Treat the fever and replace lost fluids ( see entry before)

Oral lesions with mouthwashes.

Pleconaril is an antiviral drug !!!!!!!!!!!!

Watch out for Cardiac or Neurological complications. ( stiff neck partial paralysis. See before)

Enterovirals can be misdiagnosed and often are. See herpes simplex or influenza.

There is also the possibility of a bacterial gut infection ( common in UK)

(A gram negative organism can be treated with Erythromycin!!)

Often a non polio enteroviral but all children should have been given Polio vaccine and possibly the Meningitis Vaccine hence the Public Health Dept.

(An information directory notice)

Dereklev -- Prevention is definitely better than cure so you have been given that advice.

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There are more than 70 Enteroviral infection types.

They are spread by oral to oral or faecal to oral routes

Incubation is 2-5 days

They are highly contagious

After ingestion of the infected material EV's are implanted in the alimentary tract ( nose to gut)

Specific antibodies may be detected in serum after 1 week.

Affects children under 10 years and Neotates are known to suffer myocardial problems.

Treat the fever and replace lost fluids ( see entry before)

Oral lesions with mouthwashes.

Pleconaril is an antiviral drug !!!!!!!!!!!!

Watch out for Cardiac or Neurological complications. ( stiff neck partial paralysis. See before)

Enterovirals can be misdiagnosed and often are. See herpes simplex or influenza.

There is also the possibility of a bacterial gut infection ( common in UK)

(A gram negative organism can be treated with Erythromycin!!)

Often a non polio enteroviral but all children should have been given Polio vaccine and possibly the Meningitis Vaccine hence the Public Health Dept.

(An information directory notice)

Dereklev -- Prevention is definitely better than cure so you have been given that advice.

Thanks for the advice KC.....

I have however spent the last few days taking every PRACTICAL measure to keep my son safe.

Pleconaril is licensed to treat the common cold...

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=12412

Erythromycin is used in the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erythromycin

Here is a link from the KEC Information Directory that is relevant to Enterorviruses......

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/revb/entero...olio_entero.htm

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Surely the main hospitals in Korat will know something.

As I said Lazykhao......

It is said that more than a week after it was first talked about that the local Doctors still have no idea of what the virus is.

I believe this is an irresponsible post designed to cause alarm to people with young children.

What efforts locally have you taken to determine the facts? How do you know children have died from an unknown virus? Have YOU spoken to medical professionals in the area? If so what are their names or positions. Have schools been alerted, to your personal knowledge?

You say local doctors have no idea what the virus is so you are posting here to obtain authoritative information. Do you realise how ridiculous that appears?

No doubt you will pass on forum members expert speculation to the medical authorities.

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Dereklev,

In another thread in this forum you are inviting all members to a piss up at your house this Sunday.

Please demonstrate that my previous post is unworthy by cancelling your party because if a killer virus is infecting Korat any large gathering where children are present is irresponsible.

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Dereklev,

In another thread in this forum you are inviting all members to a piss up at your house this Sunday.

Please demonstrate that my previous post is unworthy by cancelling your party because if a killer virus is infecting Korat any large gathering where children are present is irresponsible.

Next Sunday ???

The 30th is weeks away. Next Sunday is the 9th, Lazykhao are you to lazy even to work that out ?

CF

Edited by Cheeky Farang

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Dereklev

The British National Formulary states that Erythromycin is also indicated as an alternative to penicillin in hypersensitive patients, campylobacter enteritis, pneumonia, legionnaires disease, syphilis etc..

It is for gram negative organisms,the kind found in the gut and safe for children.

I was only trying to be helpful.

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