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Wp Without Degree?

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Due to recent events that I was told would never happen…Well, they happened, as I was saying, get an education and then welcome, stay as long as you like, with out an education welcome as a tourist not a teacher. How long did you think it could go on? Denial? They have medication for that? Peace and blessings wherever you go I honestly wish you the best of luck. Who said they would teach my child and I would be happy? I would like to hear your answer now.

This is something Dr Matt of the Language Institute of Chiang Mai University posted on ajarn dot com concerning degreed teachers in general and more specifically working at CMU. Search on the site for Drmatt108 and you'll find it.

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Hate to contradict you, especially an old mate like you! but we DO hire people at the Language Institute who DO NOT have a degrees IF they have done the Chiang Mai University TEFL, this was the main reason that we started the program in the first place, so that we could have a supply of teachers. Something which is becoming critical now we are moving into our new teaching complex. We are able to do this and obtain WP's because the university has a provision with the MOE to hire "special lecturers" when needed. I, personally, believe that this is a good idea because I have seen A LOT of good teachers who don't have degrees and A LOT of teachers with degrees who are not such good teachers. So what I am saying is that a degree obviously isn't the mark of whether you can teach or not. We had a woman working with us since Oct 2005, who found it hard to get work elsewhere because her lack of degree and I would say that she is one of the best teachers we have. I also know that the Department of English has one or two non-degreed teachers who have taught there for many years and are knockout teachers. I suppose I am more than a little bias. I, myself, left school at 15 and worked till I was in my early 30's then started university at 34! Yes, it is true that we have a lot of applicants however we are attempting to hire more trainers. I usually interview applicants and what I am looking for, in general, is someone who I believe will get work in Thailand AND who might be able to work with us at the Language Institute (which is still the best place I have ever worked in my life). Sometimes, for a number or reasons I suggest that people consider TEFL's other than ours(We have a certain approach to EFL that not the right fit for everyone) Cheers. Matt Director,TEFL, CMU

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That would be the website administered by an established teacher at a southern matayom school, with a work permit and visa, who still doesn't have his bachelor's degree.

This brouhaha (sp?) over visas lately has said very little about teachers not having work permits without a degree. Teachers without proper visas, yes. Teachers having trouble getting a work permit (with or without a degree), yes.

But Dr. Fisher has a valid point: these recent visa changes do affect the foreign population for English teachers, and being without a degree makes it just that much more difficult. Some employers require a degree; others don't. Some Ministry of Labour officers might require a degree; others don't. We live in interesting times.

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I agree 100% with Dr Fisher as well that if I studied a subject at secondary school, college or uni level, I would expect my teacher to have at least a degree in that field as well as some sort of teacher training.

But TEFL teaching is very different in that you don't need a degree to be able to teach the present simple verb tense. Teacher training of a recognised standard is important though.

IMO

Edited by Loaded

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I agree 100% with Dr Fisher as well that if I studied a subject at secondary school, college or uni level, I would expect my teacher to have at least a degree in that field as well as some sort of teacher training.

But TEFL teaching is very different in that you don't need a degree to be able to teach the present simple verb tense. Teacher training of a recognised standard is important though.

IMO

True or False question:

A college degree, legitimate one, is required to meet the M.o.Ed. standards to teach in an MEP Program at a government school.

I was told this, just wondered if true? Cheers. Susan

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I agree 100% with Dr Fisher as well that if I studied a subject at secondary school, college or uni level, I would expect my teacher to have at least a degree in that field as well as some sort of teacher training.

But TEFL teaching is very different in that you don't need a degree to be able to teach the present simple verb tense. Teacher training of a recognised standard is important though.

IMO

True or False question:

A college degree, legitimate one, is required to meet the M.o.Ed. standards to teach in an MEP Program at a government school.

I was told this, just wondered if true? Cheers. Susan

Couldn't you see these rules being relaxed in the near future?

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I agree 100% with Dr Fisher as well that if I studied a subject at secondary school, college or uni level, I would expect my teacher to have at least a degree in that field as well as some sort of teacher training.

But TEFL teaching is very different in that you don't need a degree to be able to teach the present simple verb tense. Teacher training of a recognised standard is important though.

IMO

True or False question:

A college degree, legitimate one, is required to meet the M.o.Ed. standards to teach in an MEP Program at a government school.

I was told this, just wondered if true? Cheers. Susan

There's no such thing as a MoE approved MEP (Mini English Program). There are EPs (English Programs) approved by the MoE. It's true many schools run what they call MEPs or Bilingual Programs but they are just a product offered by a particular school and are not directly supervised by the MoE, but often these schools present their program in a way that convinces parents they are MoE approved EPs.

As far as I'm aware (could be wrong) there are no government schools with MoE approved EPs, just private schools.

So, in response to your question Susan the answer is false because the scenario you describe doesn't exist.

Cheers, Loaded.

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Good answer, Loaded. Furthermore, TEFL is not always (or even typically) taught as part of an MEP program- and would not be subject to the same qualifications, should they even formally exist.

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Actually going by the other site and who is leaving it seems that degreed teachers and legit ones at that are leaving over the non-degreed peeps. Strange!!!

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^If that's true, Ken, it's just what I predicted after the "Karr" episode.

It's not so strange when you consider that the only thing that can be done legally is to increase the legal restrictions- which makes it harder for those who aspire to legal status. If you never went for that anyway, why would you care? More hassle for those with certain levels of qualifications just means too much hassle for some, finally.

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^ Spot on mate. I was saying the same thing to a colleague this morning (will copyright it now though to you and send you 5 Baht every time :o ).

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People with better qualifications (degree, TEFL cert, good references, etc.) can afford to go elsewhere, get paid more, get more respect, etc. To where can an unqualified "cowboy" "backpacker" go?

I know some cowboys and cowgirls in Texas who made it up pretty high (US Ambassador to the UK, Court of St. James, for example), and I still use my own backback. :o

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I know some cowboys and cowgirls in Texas who made it up pretty high (US Ambassador to the UK, Court of St. James, for example), and I still use my own backback. :o

remember the bootlegger Kennedy who also made it to the court of St. James.

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I know some cowboys and cowgirls in Texas who made it up pretty high (US Ambassador to the UK, Court of St. James, for example), and I still use my own backback. :o

remember the bootlegger Kennedy who also made it to the court of St. James.

Right. I'm thinking of Anne Armstrong, on whose ranch Dick Cheney shot his friend this year. My ex-wife attended Trinity University with Richard Kleberg III ("Tres"), who graduated; the Klebergs own a small place of two million acres, the King Ranch.

Lyndon B. Johnson was a Texas cowboy who taught school after graduating from Southwest Texas Teachers College. He once said to his buddy, "John, I can't replace these cabinet secretarys that I inherited from Kennedy, because I can't find enough well qualified alumni from my alma mater." His friend John was a Connoly, governor of Texas, who got shot in the open Lincoln with Kennedy in Dallas.

J. K. Rawlings, the sterling billionaire, once taught EFL. Oh, but I don't know if she had an earned degree in education, so she probably doesn't know how to write for schoolchildren.

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