Jump to content
BANGKOK
Sign in to follow this  
podge

Wp Without Degree?

Recommended Posts

Actually the truth is teachers with degrees make the same as teachers without degrees (for the most part), that’s my argument. Uneducated teachers drive the wages down for all of us, as do illegal workers. I don't have any problems with anyone nor do I mean any disrespect to anyone but this has been a big problem in my country for years, unqualified workers and illegal workers. I know as a fact to teaching English, as a second language in my country requires a bachelor's degree. Face it most schools are in business to make money not to teach English. So, if I didn't choose my words quite right I apologize no offence intended.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed, Dr. Fisher (and no offence taken, either). My limited TEFL experience in northern Thailand found me competing with guys who had no degree, for the same dismal wages. They didn't have a TEFL cert, a longterm visa, etc., yet we were all competing for 25K jobs, even if we taught English, science, or maths.

At least in theory, if the less qualified and less legal TEFLers left northern Thailand (and BKK, etc.), you might think that the demand and salaries for better qualified teachers would go up. My guess, however, is that demand is inelastic, or that wages are inelastic. Oops, there I go again, thinking economically without asking my son.

Anyway, I doubt many schools around Thailand will raise the average salary to 45K just to get a teacher of EFL below the uni level. The skill of the students, and the English teaching skill of the Thai teachers, in secondary education here, just doesn't call for a BA-English or a B.Ed. in English. The secondary and primary schools would be foolish to pay the going wages for an international school teacher (100K) in programs that don't make a student fluent in English.

From what my BA-MEd certified daughter tells me, I'd have to have a BA in education and a teaching subject to teach ESL back home, and then I might need special ESL certification. But then, I'd start at around 160,000 baht per month.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why do so many foreigners believe they are worth 3 or 4 times the salary of Thai teachers who do the same job?

OK, relative to the west wages are low. There are real economic reasons for this: it's a bloody poor country. Even the Thais who we think must be loaded because they drive good cars have them on credit and return home to homes valued less than the car outside. There are exceptions, but most of them won't be coming back to Thailand for a while!

The salaries in Thailand are low. You know this before you come here. Why come here and then complain? The salaries in Japan are high, we all had a choice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having spent the best part of the last hour reading these posts on Wp's , degrees, no degrees etc I am more confused now than ever! I recently enrolled on a 4 month intensive (3 month distance learning 1 month classroom based) Trinity TESOL. I do not have a degree, but i still got on the course!!!! My intention is to go back to Asia to teach English to speakers of other languages as this, I feel, is the only option open for me to be able to live and work in Asia. I will try my best at what I want to do and can only wish, for the time being, of being able to exist permanently in that (IMO)wonderful part of the world. So wonderful that I am prepared to leave behind parents and sisters who love me in search of what makes me spiritually (even though i'm not religious, strange I know!) happy. I hope I dont upset anybody by wanting do this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some home truths:

1. Anyone who realises how much money the brigands who own/profit from most schools here make will quickly abandon the idea that Thailand (or Thai schools, anyway) is "poor." The salaries are poor because of the popularity of life here and the perception that the country is poor. If you don't understand what I mean, look at an EP program sometime with 1000 students or so paying 50-100K/term/head yet paying their two dozen or so foreign teachers 30-45K a month. An even better scam is a school charging, say, 1000B/student/month for one English lesson a week with the native speaker (I've heard of charges like this from Thai parents)- if a whole school of 1000 participates (and they're packed into, say, 20 classes of 50 students each) the program administrator gets 1,000,000B per month, losing a paltry 30-35K to the TEFL teacher.

To a lesser extent I have to agree with Fisher that the relative popularity of life here (compared to many other destinations) drives down salaries. But they are already artificially low in the region- even Vietnam, not a country well known for its market economics, pays more.

2. Japan does not have high salaries, except in absolute terms. A typical TEFLer in Japan earns a third or less what a "real" Japanese teacher does. In addition, expenses are much higher, on the order of 3-4x for most items (rent, transportation) and up to 10-15x for certain types of items (fruit, food, etc.). In effect, a TEFLer in Japan is a blue-collar worker, unless he hustles pretty darn hard and lives in very basic style.

3. We are worth more than the Thai teachers in teaching our native language using our native language by far. Anyone who's worked with a lot of Thai teachers knows how ineffective so many of them are even in communicating by themselves, much less transmitting the language to the students. In another sense, economically while there is a demand for foreign teachers we are more valuable by simple law of supply and demand. This is how the market works. If we were getting paid what Thais do, we wouldn't be here. We are here because we don't.

Samui-Spen, life in Thailand *is* confusing. That's one of the challenges. There aren't any guarantees, and to be perfectly honest, this is not a very good time to be starting a teaching career here no matter what your qualifications are.

"Steven"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Having spent the best part of the last hour reading these posts on Wp's , degrees, no degrees etc I am more confused now than ever! I recently enrolled on a 4 month intensive (3 month distance learning 1 month classroom based) Trinity TESOL. I do not have a degree, but i still got on the course!!!! My intention is to go back to Asia to teach English to speakers of other languages as this, I feel, is the only option open for me to be able to live and work in Asia. I will try my best at what I want to do and can only wish, for the time being, of being able to exist permanently in that (IMO)wonderful part of the world. So wonderful that I am prepared to leave behind parents and sisters who love me in search of what makes me spiritually (even though i'm not religious, strange I know!) happy. I hope I dont upset anybody by wanting do this.

You'll have a great experience here. despite the negativity of some posts nearly everyone loves the place, and it's a wonderful place to live and work. Many people are here with the same cirumstance as you and they have good and secure jobs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Loaded's right- the place is great (after all, I'm still here after all is said and done). But it can be a rocky ride and it can take a long time to get legal (or even to know what constitutes legal- some of the schools still don't).

If you tough it out, you can be quite happy here. It's not what I'd call a cakewalk, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...