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Chantal

Spare Ribs?

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Lots of options so for what it is worth here is what I do:

First cut into sizes that you want to serve.

Second cook in boiling water for about 30 minutes.

Third and all the rest:

Get some Heinz BBQ sauce available in many Thai stores as well as Footland etc.

Then cover ribs with paint brush (buy a good one because you will be using it over and over again) using the Heinz BBQ sauce on all sides.

Then cook in oven at 185C for an hour and brush again with BBQ sauce and cook 15 minuites more. Ready to eat.

Alternative is same up to the point of putting them in the oven but instead put on Grill using some form of charcoal, and cooking less time.

Enjoy they are delicious.

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We got some ribs to BBQ a few weeks ago but then the heavens opened. I searched the net and found this:

about 1.5 kg ribs

a large onion, thinly sliced

2 limes, sliced

1 cup of ketchup

1/2 cup of worcester sauce

1 tsp cayenne pepper

a few dashes of tobasco

salt

pepper

Put the ribs in a baking tray, meat side down. Sprinkle on salt and pepper. Cook at 200 degC in an oven for 30 minutes. Remove, turn the ribs over, season again and cover with the sliced onion and lime. Cook for a further 30 minutes, same heat.

Mix the ketchup, worcester sauce, cayenne, tobasco and salt and pepper in a pan and heat it up. Add a little water if it appears too thick.

Remove the ribs from the oven, remove the lime slices and pour on the sauce. Return to the over for 30 minutes at a slightly lower temperature.

Get 'em down yer neck while they're 'ot!

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We got some ribs to BBQ a few weeks ago but then the heavens opened. I searched the net and found this:

about 1.5 kg ribs

a large onion, thinly sliced

2 limes, sliced

1 cup of ketchup

1/2 cup of worcester sauce

1 tsp cayenne pepper

a few dashes of tobasco

salt

pepper

Put the ribs in a baking tray, meat side down. Sprinkle on salt and pepper. Cook at 200 degC in an oven for 30 minutes. Remove, turn the ribs over, season again and cover with the sliced onion and lime. Cook for a further 30 minutes, same heat.

Mix the ketchup, worcester sauce, cayenne, tobasco and salt and pepper in a pan and heat it up. Add a little water if it appears too thick.

Remove the ribs from the oven, remove the lime slices and pour on the sauce. Return to the over for 30 minutes at a slightly lower temperature.

Get 'em down yer neck while they're 'ot!

I always cook ribs (racks) wrapped in a layer of tin foil for 30 mins with whetever spices , condiments , marinade you prefer(ever tried curried ribs mmmmmm) . Then after put them on the BBQ for about 5-10 mins to colour the outside, this is also the time to add extra BBQ sauce.

You get the real mealt in your mouth texture without the loss of flavour that I feel boiling them does.

Cheers

EDIT times could well be wrong always work on the smell + look basis.

Edited by percy2

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I know its slightly of topic. But the Great American Rib Company in Bangkok is fantastic.IMHO oFf course.

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Thanks so much people - I'm going to try all your recipes. Off to Don's now to buy the ribs! MMMmm!

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up in rural Suphanburi and living close to a pig abbatoir ribs are cheap and plentiful...but, ribs ain't nothin' without a good marinade before the roasting. The wife just chops them up and deep fries them...ugh!

I have experimented with making my own marinade, unsuccessfully, I'm afraid, so I look to see what tescos has got that is suitable. At the Suphan tescos they got a brown kikkoman 'cooking sauce' in a tall bottle that fills the bill. Trouble is that the sauce costs more than a kilo of ribs from the local market. The label is all in japanese so I can't make out the ingredients but it has whiffs of tropical fruit as well as the usual ingredients.

Anyway...if you can get a good marinade (if you google one could get dozens of recipies) take 2 kilos of ribs and arrange in a large baking dish and smother them with the marinade. Cover with tin foil (to be used later when roasting) and put in the fridge overnight, turn the meat over before going to bed. Next day remove the ribs and squeeze off the clinging marinade and re-arrange in the baking dish. Cover with the foil and roast in the oven on medium heat for 2 hours. Remove and let sit, it's cooked when the meat falls off the bone...even the hardest of relatives that distain falang food will be diggin' in

now, I could get started on my famous garlic chicken...a big hit hereabouts...

coming up next...Chez tutsi, catering to the deprived palates of rural Suphanburi

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Read somewhere that marinating more than 5 min is a waste of time, some chefs were discussing it and they all agreed.

Apparently meat is saturated with liquid (water) and will not absorb anything, unless maybe if you physically puncture it.

The taste you get from the marinade will be the same after 24 hours as it will be after 5min.

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Put them in the oven or on the grill after you bring them home from Villa Supermarket Sukhumvit 33... The best I've ever had!

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Read somewhere that marinating more than 5 min is a waste of time, some chefs were discussing it and they all agreed.

Apparently meat is saturated with liquid (water) and will not absorb anything, unless maybe if you physically puncture it.

The taste you get from the marinade will be the same after 24 hours as it will be after 5min.

dunno about that...there is a dehydration process that occurs when anything is placed in a refrigerator for any amount of time...in plant process for drying air for various purposes a refridgerant dryer is used. Normally if there is a disequilibrium as in moisture leaching from meat when covered by marinade in a fridge the moisture in the marinade has to go somewhere.

I would agree that at room temperature the marinade process would be less effective as you need the temperature differential from room temp to fridge temp to effect the process. That's why it is recommended to keep the marinade mixture in the fridge overnight.

Not that I say the chefs' perspective is buhshed...when you cook alot you pick up a lot regarding basic heat transfer and thermodynamics; heat to food and the reverse, controlling heat to the process to give the required effect, not wanting a boiling arrangement when a slow simmer is correct...also chemical processes with combining ingredients; you can make your baked halibut either acidic or alkaline depending on your ingredients...why does highly acidic fresh mexican salsa complement stodge like tortillas and frijoles?...something about the pH...also, if you aint got lots of rice you don't eat a whole lot of acid pet mak mak thai food, except for those that like somtam...and they are masochists anyway...

plus chefs bring alot more to the world in terms of entertainment and pleasure than engineers do...

tutsi's culinary theses...on the cathedral door of TV...

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