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Rising numbers of non-communicable diseases in Thailand's working population


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Rising numbers of non-communicable diseases in Thailand's working population
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BANGKOK, Oct 6 -- Ninety thousand Thais are suffering from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) annually, with 37 per cent of working age or younger than age 60, Deputy Health Minister Dr Somsak Chunharas said yesterday.

Thailand's official statistics showed that in 2012, 89,775 persons died of NCDs, mostly from cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure and heart diseases, said Dr Somsak.

Of the total, 37 per cent--33,545 persons died while they were young and less than 60-year-old.

If left untreated, non-communicable diseases are likely to affect household economies because the death of a major income earner leaves a gap in family incomes, and in some cases aging people could be left alone if the family has only one child, he said.

The major causes of the diseases are attributed to eating habits--unhygienic food-- and a lack of exercise, Dr Somsak said.

He quoted information released by the National Statistical Office in 2011 saying that only 26 per cent of Thais aged above 11 engage in exercise and that most Thais love to eat spicy food.

On average they eat only 1.8 grammes of vegetables and fruits a day while the UN World Health Organisation says that people should eat between 4-6 grammes daily.

In a related problem, some 17 million Thais above age 5 suffer from obesity, and there are signs that the number would rise about 4 million yearly, according to 2012 data released by the Public Health Ministry.

It is also found that Thai children aged below five are suffering from obesity, second highest after Indonesia among Association of Southeast Asian Nations member countries.

Related government agencies have been assigned to tackle the problem, he said. (MCOT online news)

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-- TNA 2014-10-06

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People here cant seem to fight things the way farangs can. Obviously hospitals are not the same. When I'm sitting having a beer in the evening its a daily flow of bikes to the wat with ladies in black.

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4 to 6 grammes should be 4 to 6 ounces I suppose.

... "some 17 million Thais above age 5 suffer from obesity, and there are signs that the number would rise about 4 million yearly"...

That means that in about 12 years from now 100% of the Thais will suffer from obesity. Which is nonesense of course.

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"The major causes of the diseases are attributed to eating habits--unhygienic food"

something to do with all the pesticides, no regulation of food hygiene? the meat outside stalls for hours & hours ? no hygiene in cooking / preparing food ?

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4 to 6 grammes should be 4 to 6 ounces I suppose.

... "some 17 million Thais above age 5 suffer from obesity, and there are signs that the number would rise about 4 million yearly"...

That means that in about 12 years from now 100% of the Thais will suffer from obesity. Which is nonesense of course.

Ofcourse it is nonsense!! It should have been 110% whistling.gif

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One of the biggest silent killers in Thailand, which causes all sorts or organ failures and secondary cancers (which become hepatic, and cause renal failures) is leptospirosis. It usually occurs through eating local river fish and crabs. BEWARE the dried fish, or even the beautifully charcoal grilled fish. They're full of it!

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In twenty years time the number of Thai people with diabetes and high blood pressure will be enormous, maybe worse than in countries like Australia and America. So many, even with all the information available on the internet still have no idea about diet and it's impact on their health. Mention to anyone how eating those deep fried snacks every day when already overweight and with high bp might not be such a good idea, and you're the bad guy for even suggesting it... saai.gif.pagespeed.ce.f25DL0fHCd.gif

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One of the biggest silent killers in Thailand, which causes all sorts or organ failures and secondary cancers (which become hepatic, and cause renal failures) is leptospirosis. It usually occurs through eating local river fish and crabs. BEWARE the dried fish, or even the beautifully charcoal grilled fish. They're full of it!

Leptospirosis is transmitted by the urine of an infected animal, and is contagious as long as the urine is still moist. Rats, mice, and moles are important primary hosts—but a wide range of other mammals including dogs, deer, rabbits, hedgehogs, cows, sheep, raccoons, opossums, skunks, and certain marine mammals carry and transmit the disease as secondary hosts. In Africa, the banded mongoose has been identified as a carrier of the pathogen, likely in addition to other African wildlife hosts.[14] Dogs may lick the urine of an infected animal off the grass or soil, or drink from an infected puddle.

Humans become infected through contact with water, food, or soil that contains urine from these infected animals. This may happen by swallowing contaminated food or water or through skin contact. The disease is not known to spread between humans, and bacterial dissemination in convalescence is extremely rare in humans. Leptospirosis is common among water-sport enthusiasts in specific areas, as prolonged immersion in water promotes the entry of the bacteria. Surfers and whitewater paddlers[16] are at especially high risk in areas that have been shown to contain the bacteria, and can contract the disease by swallowing contaminated water, splashing contaminated water into their eyes or nose, or exposing open wounds to infected water.[1

Edited by akampa
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