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Jingthing

Stuck in a rut ... ideas for easy or moderate level exotic recipes you can cook in Thailand

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JT... have you cooked that mysterious dish yet ... the one that is Libyan.

Is it difficult to get authentic ingredients in Thailand for that?

Or, are you making do?

Dude ... go get baking.

Thai Visa awaits ... licklips.gif

.

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Hmmm... just yesterday I cooked fried spring rolls wrapped in rice paper - not perfect, but damn near the original, much better than the wheat wrap version they serve everywhere because Thai cooks are too lazy to do the real thing.

previous achievements include:

- delicious aged ribeye steaks (makro) with proper french fries and sauce béarnaise (perfectly made, if I may say so)

- crispy-baked chicken wings (in the oven). this is again something that local restaurants don't serve since they prefer to go the easy way of frying the wings which loose all flavour in the process

- Russian pelimenie

Want to share your recipe?

this one is really quite easy:

- marinate the wings in the fridge with your spice mixture of choice (I use a little of neutral oil, paprika-based spice mix plus italian herbs and a good amount of salt)

Important: make sure your spice mix contains just a little tiny bit of sugar, not more (sugar carbonizes at high temperatures), usually commercially available spice mixes already contain sugar, no need to add more.

- pre-heat the oven to 200 °C

- put the wings on an oven platter and bake about 15-20 mins the first side, 10-15 mins the other side... ready!

If you want extra-crispy wings, deep freeze them before baking, then the times become 25 minutes first side, 20 minutes other side.

Good one, thanks a lot!

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Well, it took me this long to finally get around to cooking this "new to me" Libyan dish so now I will post about it. So exciting.

http://www.jpost.com/Not-Just-News/Cooking-with-JPost-Roasted-caulfilower-383998

LIBYAN "ROASTED" CAULIFLOWER!

Chef's dish:

post-37101-0-29507000-1422096199_thumb.j

My dish:

post-37101-0-54054500-1422096234_thumb.j

Dudes, the guidelines of this thread are to post about NEWER things you have started to cook ... rather than things you have cooked for years.

When you try something new for the first time, sometimes there are mistakes, sometimes the mistakes are edible and sometimes not ... so it's always a risk to try anything new, in cooking or in life

Sure enough on my new to me Libyan dish I did indeed make some mistakes, some BIG mistakes actually, and STUPID ones, but the result was still very delicious, so no regrets, and will know more to correct next time.

This recipe involved buying some new ingredients for my kitchen:

Turmeric

Cumin

Flour

Cauliflower

Cilantro

Raisins

I thought I needed a sifter but it turns out you can do sifting by whisking the flour instead, at least I read that, and did

I watched the video for the recipe and read the ingredients and steps. I got all the ingredients right but being macho I didn't write it down and ended up with some big mistakes.

First, I cut the cauliflower florets WAY TOO BIG ... so needed more cooking time, causing an issue

Secondly, I stupidly didn't mix the cumin and turmeric into the dredging flour but rather added it to the saute pan after the onions were soft (with the garlic).

It's the first time I ever tried dredging anything in flour and my technique was very clumsy but once in the pan it was clear to me the florets were too big and that the mess would burn on the recommended high heat after throwing in the florets. So the flour came off the florets and I had to add water (not in the recipe) to increase cooking time so the end result wasn't raw cauliflower.

So instead of a "dry roast" kind of dish, the end result was more like a combination of a curry and a French roux! (As the flour thickened a sauce).

From the picture I can tell you there were more raisins than it looks, they are hidden.

So I think mainly I got the intended FLAVOR of these ingredients but the way I cooked it the texture was different and probably a lot more sauce, though still a dryish sauce.

Next time I will know better. Not that what I did was bad. I loved the flavor. I have never seen a Libyan dish in a restaurant but I can say the flavor profile of these ingredients was something entirely new to me. I guess if I can say one thing it reminded me of a tiny bit is "Kugel" probably because of the mix of sweet raisins and spice.

Given that I put all the cumin and turmeric in a roux/curry style sauce I got a lot more of that spice than I would if it had just been off the dredge flour. Also it smelled up the house. But it was certainly not too spicy for me and I think I will add more spice to the flour dredge just so I get that kick again.

Other than my stupid mistakes, it was not a hard dish per se (except the flour dredging new to me), the prepping is a little involved, but the worst part is that's its a MESSY dish (the turmeric and flour) so cleanup is a bit much.

So I doubt I'll make it super often, but definitely will add this gem to my repertoire, as it is so bloody delicious!

I'm the kind of person that if reading a cookbook and I find even ONE dish that I know is easy enough for me to cook and something I want to eat, would be more than I expected. I kind of knew this Libyan dish spoke to me and I was surely right. I do recommend trying it.

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!. JT, don't buy a flour sifter. The next time you're in Tesco or big C buy a large metal strainer. The ones the actually have metal screen. You can put your ingredients in the strainer and sift them but stiring them with a spoon making them go through the screen. Flour sifters have the same screen on them but are limited to sifting flor. You can use the stainer for many things especially making sauces straining the ingredients from the liquid.

2. The next time that you want to "stir fry" cauliflower, parboil it first for a couple of minutes, strain it and let it cool. You can even use the boiling water in your recipe if it needs some liquid as it does retain some of the cauliflower liguid.

3. I made a Liberian dish last week for the first time. Mozarabe Spiced Chicke with green olives. Saw the recipe on TV, Master Chef, I think, but one of the ones that show someone cooking it and at the end they show the ingredients list fo a few nanoseconds and expect that you have a photographic memory. Cooked it in my pressure cooker, whole chicken, carrots (Ilke cooked carrots so I used a lot) and it lot of spices. The only thing that I didn't have was saffron and figs. I left out thesaffron and threw in some dried mango for the figs Came out really good. I turned the leftovers into some excellant and flavorful soup. Unlesss I am baking something I never measure anything so no recipe. It had cumin, paprika, chilli flakes, celery, onion. olives, pak chee, parsley, honey, and preserved lemon in it. I used the pressure cooker but it could be cooked in a big pot.

Keep trying new things. It's fun to cook something without a recipe adding the spices that you think you will like. I've come up with some delicious food and others that my dogs wouldn't even eat. You never know, next year they might have a new Television show Master Chef Thai Visa and you could add another trophy to your case!

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get your defib :

I made perogies stuffed with ooodles of sharp chedder cheese / mashed potato, boiled then gently pan-fried in butter.

Topped off with crispy bacon, cooked onions and mounds of sour cream. Add salt and close your eyes and enjoy.

Not recommended for those concerned about fat and cholesterol but are concerned with spoiling yourself from time to time :)

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...[snip]...

2. The next time that you want to "stir fry" cauliflower, parboil it first for a couple of minutes, strain it and let it cool. You can even use the boiling water in your recipe if it needs some liquid as it does retain some of the cauliflower liguid.

I was thinking that as well. Parboiling might be better. Without it, frying could take a long time until they're done.

Looks like a nice dish though.

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!. JT, don't buy a flour sifter. The next time you're in Tesco or big C buy a large metal strainer. The ones the actually have metal screen. You can put your ingredients in the strainer and sift them but stiring them with a spoon making them go through the screen. Flour sifters have the same screen on them but are limited to sifting flor. You can use the stainer for many things especially making sauces straining the ingredients from the liquid.

2. The next time that you want to "stir fry" cauliflower, parboil it first for a couple of minutes, strain it and let it cool. You can even use the boiling water in your recipe if it needs some liquid as it does retain some of the cauliflower liguid.

3. I made a Liberian dish last week for the first time. Mozarabe Spiced Chicke with green olives. Saw the recipe on TV, Master Chef, I think, but one of the ones that show someone cooking it and at the end they show the ingredients list fo a few nanoseconds and expect that you have a photographic memory. Cooked it in my pressure cooker, whole chicken, carrots (Ilke cooked carrots so I used a lot) and it lot of spices. The only thing that I didn't have was saffron and figs. I left out thesaffron and threw in some dried mango for the figs Came out really good. I turned the leftovers into some excellant and flavorful soup. Unlesss I am baking something I never measure anything so no recipe. It had cumin, paprika, chilli flakes, celery, onion. olives, pak chee, parsley, honey, and preserved lemon in it. I used the pressure cooker but it could be cooked in a big pot.

Keep trying new things. It's fun to cook something without a recipe adding the spices that you think you will like. I've come up with some delicious food and others that my dogs wouldn't even eat. You never know, next year they might have a new Television show Master Chef Thai Visa and you could add another trophy to your case!

Some good ideas there.

I will try the metal strainer idea ... sifters are expensive here and I wouldn't use it for anything else, not a baker.

Even though my picture looks like a stir fry result actually it's not really a stir fry dish, more like a stick it in there and "roast" it but my prep mistakes made that impossible.

I agree about recipes ... no need to use them as a crutch, they can be a starting point to spur on more creativity.

A number of my favorite regular dishes ... totally improvised.

In the case of the Libyan cauliflower I still think the recipe version is probably superior .. I'll find out.

BTW, I did substitute lime for lemon and in this case ... I think it's probably worth paying more for the lemon.

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I deep fry cauliflower along with onion rings at times - actually whatever veggie is available. I make a thin batter with flour, salt and pepper and use club soda instead of water as it aerates it so that the final product is crisp. Next time I'll add some turmeric and cumin to it for kicks.

Deep fried mozzarella cheese is great with a spicy marinara dipping sauce but I use the normal flour/egg/bread crumb preparation and freeze it before frying.

I've live here for over 16 years and I don't think that I have ever used a real yellow lemon since moving here, but, I can pick the green Thai limes directly from the tree by reaching over my back patio fence. I do have to open the gate and take a short walk to get fresh oranges, pomelo, mangos, papaya, jack fruit, bananas, custard apples, guava and and assortment of spices and Thai veggies some of which I don't even know the name. My wife often "cuts the lawn and picks some flowers" and uses it in whatever she is cooking.

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get your defib :

I made perogies stuffed with ooodles of sharp chedder cheese / mashed potato, boiled then gently pan-fried in butter.

Topped off with crispy bacon, cooked onions and mounds of sour cream. Add salt and close your eyes and enjoy.

Not recommended for those concerned about fat and cholesterol but are concerned with spoiling yourself from time to time :)

Don't forget that cholesterol checkup James. ;)

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get your defib :

I made perogies stuffed with ooodles of sharp chedder cheese / mashed potato, boiled then gently pan-fried in butter.

Topped off with crispy bacon, cooked onions and mounds of sour cream. Add salt and close your eyes and enjoy.

Not recommended for those concerned about fat and cholesterol but are concerned with spoiling yourself from time to time :)

Don't forget that cholesterol checkup James. ;)

Only once every few months smokes, too much work

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I like to watch the food network to get some ideas but the last time True reorganized the channels they omitted the food network from all 3 channels it is supposed to be on

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Hello Jingthing,

This is a good thread and an interesting stimulus. You mentioned that you don't wish to buy a new selection of implements but I think it may help to define what you may need for specific dishes.

What I make that is not an everyday dish:

Chicken liver pate with Thai truffles in season.

Pork and chicken terrine en croute

Devilled kidneys

Various daals

Hummus

Refried beans and salsas.

Apple and apricot pie.

I have purchased all ingredients at common supermarkets.

Implements:

Food processor. 3500 Baht

Sieve. 60 Baht

benchtop fan oven. 1500 Baht

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Not a recipe, but a spice mix I made recently - merguez. Usually used with lamb, but I have found it to be very versatile, using it in pork patties, vegetable stews etc.

Here's is one list of ingredients - there are variations on the web, but this is a basic mix. All ingredients can be found locally. I pulverised the mix and keep it in a sealed jar in the fridge.

1/4 cup sweet paprika

2 tablespoons ground fennel seeds

2 tablespoons ground cumin

1 tablespoon ground coriander seeds

2 tablespoons salt

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 teaspoon cayenne pepper

3/4 teaspoon black pepper

-------------------------

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In 11 years, other then an occasional , very small taste, forced upon me by the cook, I have avoided actually consuming any Thai meals, ( fried chicken/spaghetti not Thai originals ), and wonder why any Sane

person would want to duplicate their culinary disasters ?

That being said I can offer the following recipe :

1 average sized chicken

1 " " Onion

1 " " carrot

3 " " potatoes

4 Small bags of any green , weedlike, so called veggies

with leaves, branches & inhabitants

In oven 2.8 hours, at 343 F while basting continuously with a combination of Smirnoff Vodka and Jack Daniels.

Being very careful taking from hot oven , extract the solid ingredients. discard and. DRINK THE GRAVY !

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