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Smog, Smoke, Fire Season?


yaely

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Yesterday's peak at Chiang Rai station 57t was actually 386 ug/m3 PM10, 24hr value. Check it out at 0400hr, 18th March 2015.

This should be a new national record, from what I can gather. Previous record was 382 ug/m3 set on 14th March 2007.

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I checked and think nobody has posted this in the CR forum, hence I'm posting it here. Not breaking news though....

They finally reported the highest value hit, 383 ug/m3 PM10, 24-hr mean value. (actually it was 386 ug/m3 PM10 24-hr mean for 57t at 0400h 18th Mar). Nevertheless, technically it's still above the previous record of 382 ug/m3 PM10 24-hr value recorded on 14th Mar 2007.

Credit :

http://www.chiangrai...g-rai-haze.html

CHIANG RAI – The Military Junta has ordered authorities to work with neighbouring countries to tackle haze pollution in the northern provinces caused by slash-and-burn farming. Calling on authorities to enforce laws regarding land burning.

The Nation reported that Thai Military mobilised all its resources yesterday to combat the haze crisis in the North, which threatens to be the worst in recent history, with air pollution in some parts of Chiang Rai province already three times beyond safety limits.

The situation has worsened to the point that several military aircraft, including two Chinooks from Singapore, are actively spraying the area with water in a bid to reduce the smog.

The Thai-Myanmar Joint Border Committee will convene a meeting in Chiang Rai’s Mae Sai district to discuss the smog problem today. The air pollution in this district stood at 280 micrograms of particulate matter per cubic metre of air yesterday. The particulate matter is less than less than 10 microns in diameter (PM10).

The amount of PM10 per cubic metre of air was also alarmingly high at 383mcg in Chiang Rai’s Muang district between 7am and 9am yesterday.

The amount of PM10 should never exceed 120mcg per cubic metre of air.

Chiang Rai’s disaster-prevention-and-mitigation chief Sawang Momdee said “We are now seriously advising people to wear face masks when going outside.”

Thick smog reduced visibility on the road to just 500 metres, though it did not affect flight services to and from the province yesterday. Chiang Rai Airport has installed extra lighting on its runway to improve visibility.

The Pollution Control Department said the situation will worsen today due to overall weather conditions, adding that the amount of PM10 will most likely rise in all eight smog-hit provinces in the North by between 2 and 8 per cent.

Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha said “It’s difficult to persuade locals not to burn off forests and land. Authorities need to enforce laws prohibiting the practice.”

The practice is part of local cultural heritage, he added.

Prayut has ordered the Natural Resources and Environment Ministry to lead other ministries in tackling the haze problem.

The Foreign Ministry would be ordered to send a letter to neighbouring countries and request cooperation in dealing with a number of haze pollution hot spots, said Wichien Jungrungruang, chief of the Pollution Control Department.

Singaporean Assistance

Apart from Chiang Rai, the provinces of Mae Hong Son, Chiang Mai, Phayao, Nan, Lampang, Phrae and Uttaradit are also struggling with air pollution.

Royal Thai Air Force (RTAF) spokesman ACM Monthon Satchukorn said yesterday that Singapore Air Force, which is taking part in Cope Tiger 2015 joint military exercises, will deploy its two Chinook helicopters to help Thailand deal with the smog and forest-fire problem. These helicopters will join the several that Thailand’s armed forces have deployed for the mission. By Nattawat Laping, Panya Thiosangwan,Ayuthai Nontirat

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Post removed. Forum rule 26) The Bangkok Post and Phuketwan do not allow quotes from their news articles or other material to appear on Thaivisa.com. Neither do they allow links to their publications. Posts from members containing quotes from or links to Bangkok Post or Phuketwan publications will be deleted from the forum.

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If you have an aircondition unit in your house , the run it,shut doors and windows. The condenser will cause water droplets to form with some smoke particle and so reduce the pollution in your room. Definitely sleep in such a room. It works . Be healthy ANGIOLO

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I just read this article on Chiang Rai Times, Ban on Burning Won't Work. It is nice that they are finally placing some blame on the corn industry. Anyone who has driving the backcountry roads of Northern Thailand has seen the mountains planted in corn for are far as you can see. They say that 5 mil rai of the 7 mil rai of corn is planted in the North plus there is more across the border.

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I just read this article on Chiang Rai Times, Ban on Burning Won't Work. It is nice that they are finally placing some blame on the corn industry. Anyone who has driven the backcountry roads of Northern Thailand has seen the mountains planted in corn for as far as you can see. They say that 5 mil rai of the 7 mil rai of corn is planted in the North plus there is more across the border.

Two small corrections I missed the first time around.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The air quality is not bad today but there is always that one guy who sees that as an open invitation to start another fire. Pardon the photo quality but I only had the iPhone while walking the dogs. I am intrigued, and find it oddly attractive, the way the smoke travels low over the fields without rising into the sky.

smoke%2520%2520001%2520%25281%2529.jpg

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The air quality is not bad today but there is always that one guy who sees that as an open invitation to start another fire. Pardon the photo quality but I only had the iPhone while walking the dogs. I am intrigued, and find it oddly attractive, the way the smoke travels low over the fields without rising into the sky.

The inversion layer at work perhaps, newly created hot air (containing polution) is trapped at low levels by a layer of cooler air which stops the polluted air from rising, consequently it travels horizontally until it is able to escape. Typically ocurs before 2:00pm, before which time the sun has had time to warm the colder air, allowing it to rise.

Alternatively, there's a bloke to the right, out of camera, with a really large vacum cleaner, what his business is remains a mystery.

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The air quality is not bad today but there is always that one guy who sees that as an open invitation to start another fire. Pardon the photo quality but I only had the iPhone while walking the dogs. I am intrigued, and find it oddly attractive, the way the smoke travels low over the fields without rising into the sky.

The inversion layer at work perhaps, newly created hot air (containing polution) is trapped at low levels by a layer of cooler air which stops the polluted air from rising, consequently it travels horizontally until it is able to escape. Typically ocurs before 2:00pm, before which time the sun has had time to warm the colder air, allowing it to rise.

Alternatively, there's a bloke to the right, out of camera, with a really large vacum cleaner, what his business is remains a mystery.

In situations like this, I choose to ignore the science and simply enjoy the visual wonder before me. Of course that is easier to do when it is far enough away that I cannot smell it or feel it burning my eyes.

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The air quality is not bad today but there is always that one guy who sees that as an open invitation to start another fire. Pardon the photo quality but I only had the iPhone while walking the dogs. I am intrigued, and find it oddly attractive, the way the smoke travels low over the fields without rising into the sky.

The inversion layer at work perhaps, newly created hot air (containing polution) is trapped at low levels by a layer of cooler air which stops the polluted air from rising, consequently it travels horizontally until it is able to escape. Typically ocurs before 2:00pm, before which time the sun has had time to warm the colder air, allowing it to rise.

Alternatively, there's a bloke to the right, out of camera, with a really large vacum cleaner, what his business is remains a mystery.

In situations like this, I choose to ignore the science and simply enjoy the visual wonder before me. Of course that is easier to do when it is far enough away that I cannot smell it or feel it burning my eyes.

I was hoping someone else would correct the above misrepresentation of inversions. I guess it is up to me. Normally air rises and cools at a regular rate. If it encounters a warmer than expected layer of air, the upward movement is stalled, with the air and in this case smoke, being trapped below this layer of warmer air. The inversion is not created by a layer of cooler air. This seems to be a common occurrence here in the north.

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I can’t speak for the other amateur snappers but I aim to please the many, not the few, so I will no doubt continue to add photos when I feel it is appropriate. Sorry to hear about your bad connection and hope you get a faster connection soon.

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Hmm, if you got outside of the suburbs more often you'd know that the networks (all of them) are not 100%. I would have thought you must also be aware that storms affect even the most urban of networks.

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  • 10 months later...

I see from the posted dates these are from last year. What is the current status? Also, I have tried to backtrack some threads to find out the best-recommended breathing mask, make number etc.

I see suggestions for 3M p95 masks is that the recommended one?

We are still having snow here in Saskatoon Saskatchewan Canada so as well as big temp difference the air quality will be a big thing .

I am prone to respiratory hassles from 30+ years of wreaking my lungs by smoking for 30 + years.

I know by the time I get there it will start to clear in a month but I don't need to start my visit off with respiratory problems.

So any suggestion would be greatly appreciated.

I am certainly looking forward to getting home after an extended time away.

I will be coming back to Chiang Rai on the 8 April.

Thanks in advance

Randell

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I see from the posted dates these are from last year. What is the current status? Also, I have tried to backtrack some threads to find out the best-recommended breathing mask, make number etc.

I see suggestions for 3M p95 masks is that the recommended one?

We are still having snow here in Saskatoon Saskatchewan Canada so as well as big temp difference the air quality will be a big thing .

I am prone to respiratory hassles from 30+ years of wreaking my lungs by smoking for 30 + years.

I know by the time I get there it will start to clear in a month but I don't need to start my visit off with respiratory problems.

So any suggestion would be greatly appreciated.

I am certainly looking forward to getting home after an extended time away.

I will be coming back to Chiang Rai on the 8 April.

Thanks in advance

Randell

Have a read of this thread.

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/900706-haze-starts-to-cover-phayao-despite-60-day-burning-ban/

It is about Phayao but has a lot of info and stats for Chiang Rai

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I see from the posted dates these are from last year. What is the current status? Also, I have tried to backtrack some threads to find out the best-recommended breathing mask, make number etc.

I see suggestions for 3M p95 masks is that the recommended one?

We are still having snow here in Saskatoon Saskatchewan Canada so as well as big temp difference the air quality will be a big thing .

I am prone to respiratory hassles from 30+ years of wreaking my lungs by smoking for 30 + years.

I know by the time I get there it will start to clear in a month but I don't need to start my visit off with respiratory problems.

So any suggestion would be greatly appreciated.

I am certainly looking forward to getting home after an extended time away.

I will be coming back to Chiang Rai on the 8 April.

Thanks in advance

Randell

The best masks are N95. You don't need N99 or N100, those are expensive and not needed for current levels. See if you can get a 3M 9210, do a google to see how it looks. It is foldable so it's much easier to bring around.

It should be easy to find in pharmacies in Canada.

I posted some latest updates in this thread. It seems to be deteriorating day by day. http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/900706-haze-starts-to-cover-phayao-despite-60-day-burning-ban/page-4#entry10559701

Not sure what would the conditions be on April 8th though, rains are supposed to come, but don't bet on it for this year as it's the trailing end of a Super El Nino year and the El Nino conditions are still very bad now.

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Thank you. Vivid and Ripstanley for you quick response. I will check out the Phayao thread. I will also check for those masks here before I come. Thanks again . Really looking forward to getting home even with the present conditions.

Randell

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