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Smog, Smoke, Fire Season?


yaely

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In that case I would wait until the rainy season starts in May or June. Wait until we have at least one big storm which lasts for more than one day. Then the sky will be beautiful.

Will it really? What about the small fires people make in their backyards? Here in Chanthaburi we are yet to find neighborhood where one can breatthe freely. I'm assuming it's the same around CR and CM?

You are correct in assuming people burn throughout the year. What changes is the volume of burning and the meteorological conditions. I have photographic evidence of how nice it can be but it is not that way all the time.

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No two days are ever the same. We have good days and bad days but with a little common sense there is no reason a healthy person can't adapt to the changes. At least we aren't going to freeze to death in a blizzard.

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Went to Chiang Mai last Saturday and saw fire-fighting units along the way. I kind of find this a bit worrying because if they do not allow the fires to occur, forest floor debris accumulates and in later years could be more fuel for larger - more intense fires that eventually kill the trees. So Human intervention to suppress these fires could actually be causing more danger to the forest in later years. Low intensity forest fires, on the other hand allows tree seeds to germinate. Fire is one way of scarifying seeds. Scarification is the process of weakening the nut to allow the seed to germinate.

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The thing is, this yearly burning is human intervention as well and clearly not natural.

One does wonder what would happen to those huge teak leaves on the forest floor, if they were left alone. Would they work their way into the soil and improve its quality, spurring more growth? Would they create a dense carpet of organic material and perhaps suppress the growth of unwanted plants? Maybe they would remain dry tinder and lead to massive uncontrolled forest fires.

I keep expecting one of our local fires to get out of control and scorch an entire mountain or burn down someone’s home. Surprisingly my worst fears have yet to become a reality, at least in our area. I clearly don’t appreciate this time of year, and how it curtails some of my favorite activities, but I seem to lack the certainty of others when it comes to opinions on how to fix the problem.
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I'm going to go way out on a limb (pun intended)

Wildfires are exclusive to conifers? In a forest where fire suppression is priority... take the famous Yellowstone fire.

Here, the leaves on the forest floor would not provide enough fuel to create the heat and the teak trees do not burn like a conifer?

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Reasons for Prescribed Buring

There are many potential benefits to be gained from using prescribed burning as a tool in forest resource management, including the reduction of hazardous fuels; the preparation of sites for seeding or planting; the improvement of wildlife habitat; the disposal of logging debris; disease control; etc.

A single prescribed burn can achieve multiple benefits. For example, a well-planned burn can reduce fire hazard and also improve wildlife habitat, and almost any prescribed burn improves access. Prescribed fires are not always beneficial, however. When conditions are wrong, prescribed fire can severely damage the very resource it was intended to benefit. Prescribed fire is a complex management tool, and should be used only with care under controlled conditions.

Reduce hazardous fuels

Forest fuels accumulate rapidly in the pine stands of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains. In five to six years, heavy "roughs" (the live understorey and dead fuels that accumulate on the forest plains over time) can build up, posing a serious threat from wildfire to all forest resources. Prescribed fire is the most practical way to reduce dangerous accumulations of combustible fuels under southern pine stands.

The appropriate interval between prescribed burns for fuel reduction varies with several factors, which include the rate of fuel accumulation, past wildfire occurrence, and values at risk. The interval between fires can be as little as one year, although a three- or four-year cycle is adequate to attain most objectives.

http://www.fao.org/docrep/t9500e/t9500e07.htm

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It's not a bad year for smoke really. It is worse the last week or so then it was, but it has been much worse by this time previous years. We should be through the worst of it in a couple of weeks.

To the OP, there is no difference in the general area around Chiang Rai province for smoke. It moves with the wind and comes from the whole region, and Burma and Laos too. So trying to pick a place to live in the province to miss the smoke would be quite impossible. However, most of the year it won't be an issue. As far as the masks go, If you think you can wear them 24/7 go ahead and buy them, but if it were me I would come up and see for myself first. If you are arriving on the 20th, it is possible the smoke is already thinning out for the year. March is the worst part generally.

I wrote this post before the sun came up. The last three days have been pretty bad. Hopefully this is the peak.

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It's not a bad year for smoke really. It is worse the last week or so then it was, but it has been much worse by this time previous years. We should be through the worst of it in a couple of weeks.

To the OP, there is no difference in the general area around Chiang Rai province for smoke. It moves with the wind and comes from the whole region, and Burma and Laos too. So trying to pick a place to live in the province to miss the smoke would be quite impossible. However, most of the year it won't be an issue. As far as the masks go, If you think you can wear them 24/7 go ahead and buy them, but if it were me I would come up and see for myself first. If you are arriving on the 20th, it is possible the smoke is already thinning out for the year. March is the worst part generally.

I wrote this post before the sun came up. The last three days have been pretty bad. Hopefully this is the peak.

I hope you are right but this came on so quickly, it holds the potential to get much worse.

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Reasons for Prescribed Buring

There are many potential benefits to be gained from using prescribed burning as a tool in forest resource management, including the reduction of hazardous fuels; the preparation of sites for seeding or planting; the improvement of wildlife habitat; the disposal of logging debris; disease control; etc.

A single prescribed burn can achieve multiple benefits. For example, a well-planned burn can reduce fire hazard and also improve wildlife habitat, and almost any prescribed burn improves access. Prescribed fires are not always beneficial, however. When conditions are wrong, prescribed fire can severely damage the very resource it was intended to benefit. Prescribed fire is a complex management tool, and should be used only with care under controlled conditions.

Reduce hazardous fuels

Forest fuels accumulate rapidly in the pine stands of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains. In five to six years, heavy "roughs" (the live understorey and dead fuels that accumulate on the forest plains over time) can build up, posing a serious threat from wildfire to all forest resources. Prescribed fire is the most practical way to reduce dangerous accumulations of combustible fuels under southern pine stands.

The appropriate interval between prescribed burns for fuel reduction varies with several factors, which include the rate of fuel accumulation, past wildfire occurrence, and values at risk. The interval between fires can be as little as one year, although a three- or four-year cycle is adequate to attain most objectives.

http://www.fao.org/docrep/t9500e/t9500e07.htm

An interesting piece on fire management in the Southern United States but I am not sure how much of it can be viewed as relevant to our local situation.

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Tart,

The respirator N-95 works fine and should around $5-10 US dollars. They are disposable after a period of time/usage but that depends on the absorption of the contaminants. There is no disposal rule of thumb...

Someone mention wait to May - May is one of the worst weather months (Mar - May) so at the very least June but really depends on the first rains..

CB

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