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george

Why are white people expats when the rest of us are immigrants?

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falang is people from outside of country. If they are white, that falang is polite, smart, and have some money. So if you are white, dont worry too much.

Falang that is black, ie africa origin, it is not thought of nicely. For example, too black, dumb, white teeth( they laugh at this time too), with a big dingdong.

Asian girls with white guy is better than with black guy in their view. But tell that to the NBA players in America, it doesn't work.

I guess its in the asian culture, to not stir up trouble, etc.

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georgeubon, on 16 Mar 2015 - 10:45, said:

falang is people from outside of country. If they are white, that falang is polite, smart, and have some money. So if you are white, dont worry too much.

Falang that is black, ie africa origin, it is not thought of nicely. For example, too black, dumb, white teeth( they laugh at this time too), with a big dingdong.

Asian girls with white guy is better than with black guy in their view. But tell that to the NBA players in America, it doesn't work.

I guess its in the asian culture, to not stir up trouble, etc.

Only whitish Europeans are Farangs!! Other nationalities are NEVER called Farangs!!

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Listen to this.

I have heard Vietnamese in Vietnam calling vietnamese from america , a falang. Or calling a Korean, Japanese , Chinese, Laos, Cambodian a falang as well.

Falang can have advantages and disadvantages. For example, if you don't play with anyone is because you are a falang. In their head, in outside countries, they live to themselves, don't play with anybody. But if you hire someone to work or do construction or repair. They will want more money because you are a falang. With money or stupid don't know anything.

Everything is boiled down to money, money and money. Mayweather probably would have a good time with his money in the asian country.

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Why do we always want to label people?

What is the difference if I'm an expat, an immigrant, a migrant or whatever else?

I'm still Costas that chosen to live in another country than mine.

Labeling me doesn't change anything in my life or the way I've chosen to live.

They call me an Alien at immigration .

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JB300, on 16 Mar 2015 - 09:58, said:
laubau" data-cid="9192031" data-time="1426483912" data-date="Today, 13:31 said:

Have a clue! For the same reason, only while people are called Farangs by Thais, Kwai lo by Chinese, Orang Bulleh by Indonesians, Masaleh by Malaysians, Orang Puteh by Singaporeans and Haole by Hawaiians!!

I thought I was "Bule" to Indonesians, "Ang Moh" to Singaporeans & "Kano" to Filipinos.

Oh & apparently, being a white guy, it's impossible for me to be an ethnic minority!!! This from a serious conversation with (supposedly intelligent) Indian colleagues whilst working in Singapore who told me they were ethnic minorities (Indians are the 3rd largest ethnic group in Singapore) but I couldn't be one as I was white/British [emoji15]

Sorry for the spelling mistake. It is either Bule or Bulek in Indonesia. If you want to get technical, Kwai Loh or Gwai Lo is used by the vast majority of Chinese & Singaporean-Chinese and it is offensive! The Cantonese in Malaysia & Singapore use Ang Moh but they are still a minority in Singapore & China for sure. I do not care what Wikipedia says!! (Do not forget the old speak Mandarin campaign). I have lived and worked in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, China & Thailand for about 30 years. For your info, I was married to a Singaporean-Malay, speak fluent Malay/Indonesian and lived in Singapore for about 10 years. If you only hang out with Cantonese...

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Tomtomtom69, on 16 Mar 2015 - 09:04, said:Tomtomtom69, on 16 Mar 2015 - 09:04, said:
laubau, on 16 Mar 2015 - 08:31, said:laubau, on 16 Mar 2015 - 08:31, said:

Have a clue! For the same reason, only while people are called Farangs by Thais, Kwai lo by Chinese, Orang Bulleh by Indonesians, Masaleh by Malaysians, Orang Puteh by Singaporeans and Haole by Hawaiians!!

Knowing that the word "orang" means human or person in Malay and Indonesian, the Indonesian and Singaporean terms you have presented (although I've got to say the Singaporean one is a bit odd as normally they use English and when another word is used, I've only heard "ang moh", which is Cantonese? or something in origin not Malay) sound a lot more pleasant and less discriminatory than the blatant use of farang by Thais, barang by Khmers or other words used by other nationals in the region. Although not knowing much Khmer, I do have a good ear for these things and have heard the word "barang" being used far less often in Cambodia than the word "farang" in Thailand. Even in Laos, a country where I can speak the language, the word "falang" (note that in Lao there is no "r" sound) is not used nearly as loosely as in Thailand. If anything I've heard people say "khon falang", which means Frenchman or sounds a bit more formal and respectful more than just "falang" as would be the case in Thailand.

Kwai Loh or Gwai Lo and Haole are used with more bitterness and Kwai Loh is much more derogatory than Farang or Falang in Thailand and Laos. Ang Moh is used by the Cantonese which are a minority in Singapore. I have lived & worked for years in Singapore & SE Asia. Singaporean-Malays use Masaleh and Orang Puteh very frequently!

Edited by laubau

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Actually, I'm white, European - and an "alien". Well, that's what Thai Immigration reckons, anyway. And they should know. My guess is the same goes for Africans, Arabs and the rest of the would-be "expats" here.

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JB300, on 16 Mar 2015 - 09:58, said:

laubau" data-cid="9192031" data-time="1426483912" data-date="Today, 13:31 said:

Have a clue! For the same reason, only while people are called Farangs by Thais, Kwai lo by Chinese, Orang Bulleh by Indonesians, Masaleh by Malaysians, Orang Puteh by Singaporeans and Haole by Hawaiians!!

I thought I was "Bule" to Indonesians, "Ang Moh" to Singaporeans & "Kano" to Filipinos.

Oh & apparently, being a white guy, it's impossible for me to be an ethnic minority!!! This from a serious conversation with (supposedly intelligent) Indian colleagues whilst working in Singapore who told me they were ethnic minorities (Indians are the 3rd largest ethnic group in Singapore) but I couldn't be one as I was white/British [emoji15]

Sorry for the spelling mistake. It is either Bule or Bulek in Indonesia. If you want to get technical, Kwai Loh or Gwai Lo is used by the vast majority of Chinese & Singaporean-Chinese and it is offensive! The Cantonese in Malaysia & Singapore use Ang Moh but they are still a minority in Singapore & China for sure. I do not care what Wikipedia says!! (Do not forget the old speak Mandarin campaign). I have lived and worked in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, China & Thailand for about 30 years. For your info, I was married to a Singaporean-Malay, speak fluent Malay/Indonesian and lived in Singapore for about 10 years. If you only hang out with Cantonese...
Interesting, you learn something new everyday, I thought Gwai Lo was Japanese & in my 6 1/2 years of Working with the local Singaporean & Malaysian Chinese (all of whom speak Mandarin), I've never heard anything but Ang Moh used (in fact, my Filipina girlfriend has spent so much time in Singapore she uses the term Ang Moh when referring to a white person, come to think of it, as did all of the Filipinos I was working with).

I'm not saying that I'm right & you're wrong, just that my experience has been different... Maybe people are just being polite (I don't find the term Ang Moh offensive though Singapore is fast becoming much more xenophobic so it may well become).

Cheers

JB

Edit: Quick google search shows that you are correct and Gweilo is the correct term, as it seems Ang Moh is more of a Singaporean (Hokkien)/Malaysian thing which could be why it's what I'm used to hearing there http://www.angmohdan.com/8-ang-moh-adjectives/

Edited by JB300

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JB300, on 16 Mar 2015 - 11:34, said:
laubau" data-cid="9192668" data-time="1426493902" data-date="25 minutes ago said:
JB300" data-cid="9192366" data-time="1426489087" data-date="Today, 14:58 said:

JB300, on 16 Mar 2015 - 09:58, said:

laubau" data-cid="9192031" data-time="1426483912" data-date="Today, 13:31 said:

laubau" data-cid="9192031" data-time="1426483912" data-date="Today, 13:31 said:

Have a clue! For the same reason, only while people are called Farangs by Thais, Kwai lo by Chinese, Orang Bulleh by Indonesians, Masaleh by Malaysians, Orang Puteh by Singaporeans and Haole by Hawaiians!!

I thought I was "Bule" to Indonesians, "Ang Moh" to Singaporeans & "Kano" to Filipinos.

Oh & apparently, being a white guy, it's impossible for me to be an ethnic minority!!! This from a serious conversation with (supposedly intelligent) Indian colleagues whilst working in Singapore who told me they were ethnic minorities (Indians are the 3rd largest ethnic group in Singapore) but I couldn't be one as I was white/British [emoji15]

Sorry for the spelling mistake. It is either Bule or Bulek in Indonesia. If you want to get technical, Kwai Loh or Gwai Lo is used by the vast majority of Chinese & Singaporean-Chinese and it is offensive! The Cantonese in Malaysia & Singapore use Ang Moh but they are still a minority in Singapore & China for sure. I do not care what Wikipedia says!! (Do not forget the old speak Mandarin campaign). I have lived and worked in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, China & Thailand for about 30 years. For your info, I was married to a Singaporean-Malay, speak fluent Malay/Indonesian and lived in Singapore for about 10 years. If you only hang out with Cantonese...
Interesting, you learn something new everyday, I thought Gwai Lo was Japanese & in my 6 1/2 years of Working with the local Singaporean & Malaysian Chinese (all of whom speak Mandarin), I've never heard anything but Ang Moh used (in fact, my Filipina girlfriend has spent so much time in Singapore she uses the term Ang Moh when referring to a white person, come to think of it, as did all of the Filipinos I was working with).

I'm not saying that I'm right & you're wrong, just that my experience has been different... Maybe people are just being polite (I don't find the term Ang Moh offensive though Singapore is fast becoming much more xenophobic so it may well become).

Cheers

JB

Edit: Quick google search shows that you are correct and Gweilo is the correct term, as it seems Ang Moh is more of a Singaporean (Hokkien)/Malaysian thing which could be why it's what I'm used to hearing there http://www.angmohdan.com/8-ang-moh-adjectives/

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George, George, George...of all the problems facing Thailand at the moment...this is not one to make the top 100 list...chill dear...

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An expat is someone that will never integrate into the society that he is in, an Immigrant will make more efforts to integrate into his new home.

Don't tell the Thai visa redneck society this. According the them immigrants don't want to fit in and force us to bow to their every wish.

I guess if they just call themselves expats then they wouldn't have such issues with the redneck squad!

Edited by samran
  • Like 1

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Why are white immigrants, no matter how long they stay in Thailand, always tourists?

because they are not immigrants that's why, they haven't legally migrated and been given right of abode in Thailand and have to seek permission from immigration to remain in country and the fact that the permission given is temporary, you are a "tourist" irrespective of how long someone lives in country

the legal position on this is clear in ones passport as to your status for most people... what do you think that "Non-immigrant" thing means on your visa ? rolleyes.gif

Edited by Soutpeel

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So is my black british friend that lives and works here a migrant or an expat considering we both have the same exact occupation?

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