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Can you use Thai Baht in Cambodia?


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It is accepted, but I strongly recommend changing bath to usd before going there. Don't bother with local currency. They all use usd and local currency just for sums below 1 dollar as they don't use usd coins. If you go with baht, you will be constantly screwed with exchange rate.

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Never seen so much misinformation: I have been to Cambodia dozen of times, biked all over the country. The thai baht is a great currency to carry in Cambodia,but you don't pay there in Baht- other than near the Thai border- you change them into Riel at the ubiquitous moneychangers, and you get a great rate in most cities.(best in Poipet, sisophon , Battambang and PP), the rate is not quite as good in smaller towns, and gets real bad in the mountain provinces near Vietnam. So get some $, esp. for the visa and bigger transaction. Has rogerpilly ever been to Cambodia: It makes no difference(well maybe a fraction of a Baht)whether you pay in US$ or Riel.On the contrary , in smaller restaurants, I found the bill often higher when you pay in $

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I forgot to say you can also use Thai atm card to withdraw, you can choose between usd and local currency.

The ATMs which pay out in Riel are easily identifiable by the wheelbarrows available for hire nearby. rolleyes.gif

For all the other ATMs which pay out USD it's best to ask for $?90 to force them to give you some smaller bills.

As said Thai Baht can be used near the borders but once into Phnom Penh can easily be changed for USD eg at money changers around Central Market.

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I have one $100 bill, If I use it to pay for the visa on arrival in Siem Reap will they give me the change in USD? Of course if I have the time I will try to change it for lower denominations. I am going tomorrow morning.

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I have one $100 bill, If I use it to pay for the visa on arrival in Siem Reap will they give me the change in USD? Of course if I have the time I will try to change it for lower denominations. I am going tomorrow morning.

They will - if your $199 bill is in pristine condition, otherwise it will be rejected.

To all those people ecommending that you bring Dollars, they ommited to mention that larger notes ($20 and above) will be scrutinised as if you were a criminal. Any defects - rips etc - and they will not accept them.

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I used baht for the cab to the hotel but then USD after that in Cambodia. Funny how you mention using baht in Laos. Other than restaurants, everyone else couldnt exchange baht for kip at all without ridiculous incorrect exchange rates. Tuk tuk drivers and coffee shops were completely incapable and often looked surprised when I tried using baht. I would stick with kip in Laos. Also regarding large notes, the cash machines in Cambodia always gave me 100 bills and I never had trouble exchanging them for smaller denominations in the bank or hotel. It is true that the notes were fresh from an ATM so maybe that is why I had no problem. Enjoy Siem Reap! If you need a great tuk tuk man who speaks English and is very reasonable for short rides, half day, full day or even multi day service PM me. I am talking like $15 for a whole day of touring. It was like having a chauffeur for a week. Guy was a gem.

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I forgot to say you can also use Thai atm card to withdraw, you can choose between usd and local currency.

The ATMs which pay out in Riel are easily identifiable by the wheelbarrows available for hire nearby. rolleyes.gif

For all the other ATMs which pay out USD it's best to ask for $?90 to force them to give you some smaller bills.

As said Thai Baht can be used near the borders but once into Phnom Penh can easily be changed for USD eg at money changers around Central Market.

Wow that's a fiscally irresponsible claim. Anytime you use an atm with a fee (basically all ATM's in SEA), you should take a single large quantity as opposed to multiple small sums. I would much rather pay $5 on $500 (1%) and exchange the bills at the bank than $5 on $90x5 (5.55%). Lemme know if you need some money changed in the future, I would be more than happy to help you. licklips.gif.pagespeed.ce.v-hsVd-WpuUk8nlicklips.gif.pagespeed.ce.v-hsVd-WpuUk8n

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I used baht for the cab to the hotel but then USD after that in Cambodia. Funny how you mention using baht in Laos. Other than restaurants, everyone else couldnt exchange baht for kip at all without ridiculous incorrect exchange rates. Tuk tuk drivers and coffee shops were completely incapable and often looked surprised when I tried using baht. I would stick with kip in Laos. Also regarding large notes, the cash machines in Cambodia always gave me 100 bills and I never had trouble exchanging them for smaller denominations in the bank or hotel. It is true that the notes were fresh from an ATM so maybe that is why I had no problem. Enjoy Siem Reap! If you need a great tuk tuk man who speaks English and is very reasonable for short rides, half day, full day or even multi day service PM me. I am talking like $15 for a whole day of touring. It was like having a chauffeur for a week. Guy was a gem.

This is I suppose really off topic but this is not my experience in Vientiane where Baht and kip prices were quoted together and everyone was perfectly happy to take either kip or baht. Only 1 time did they try to use an incorrect exchange rate, apart from that it was fine.

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I am in Cambodia at the moment, was in Siem Reap last week, had no issue at any of the places that I offered my THB to. Most of the mini marts/convenience stores in Siem Reap have a POS system that immediately converts your total to one of several currencies. I don't know how many different currencies, but definitely GBP, USD, KHR and THB and at very reasonable rates too. I am in Phnom Penh now and I find its much more difficult to pay in anything other than USD and KHR. There seems to be a pretty much universal conversation in the shops of 4100 KHR to 1 USD.

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Wow thanks all, a wide range of differing information lol I shall have to look into this properly before I go, although my previous asian experience suggests that the dodgey money changers are probably the way to go...

One other thing, I've been to Vientiane several times for non o s etc & have never had any kind of problem using Bahts, & have never been scammed on the exchange rate there either...

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You are right about the poor exchange rate with Thai Baht and the USD. I just wanted to add that I still needed some local currency for Taxis and such. Difficult to get change back from $10 US from a Street Vendor for a bottle of water.

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I did get scammed at the border. I think I lost about $50, but then the lady who owned the guesthouse I was staying in gave me a good rate back to USD. I might have eventually worked the total scam loss down to $25...but you just feel so stupid IMMEDIATELY after it happens. Of course, don't use the ATM at the border. I got about 50 free meals in Thailand from nice people, and I must have let my guard down. They won that battle, I will admit. A million ways you can get taken for extra cash, some are just more obvious. But my airline waved the bike fee twice, saving me $400....everyday there is an angle. either you have one, or they do.

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I would suggest changing Thai Baht or $ dollars to kip. A little at a time. Tuk Tuk drivers love Thai baht. But if you pay in kip it is usually 10 baht cheaper. Shops, post cards etc. pay in kip. much cheaper. Pepsi, noodles etc. much cheaper in kip. Not much, but you learn the local currency value if you deal in kip. Don't go overboard. Change a little everyday. Laos is heaven compared with the crap you deal with in Thailand. Just my opinion.

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My only guideline is I look at the price sticker, usually in riel or US. I count it out in US dollars/riel and I know that's exactly what I'm handing out to match the price and know to within a couple hundred riel what I'm getting back. Handing over baht or pounds or euros introduces the fudge factor, which is always in favour of the house. Simple.

I trust those money changers in the markets who post their rates. Step back, do your calculations. Don't do the deal without knowing in advance what you should get in exchange.

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If you go into any of the Cambodian Casinos near the Thai-Cambo border (Poipet, Osmach, etc.), Cambodian currency is not accepted. Only USD and Thai Baht. USD and Thai Baht is preferred over Cambo Riel if you travel to Siem Reap. thumbsup.gif

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I live in Siem Reap. You can spend Baht here but the exchange rates are normally pretty bad in most venues - I have friends who run restaurants, etc. here and they'd rather not deal in Baht unless they have to - so they charge a premium to do so. Go to the Old Market and change your Baht at one of the money changers on the road down the side... shop around and one of them will change at the interbank rate (seriously) so you simply cannot change Baht more cheaply anywhere on earth (including Thailand). I change up with them when I leave for Thailand and change back as soon as I arrive back. US Dollars are accepted everywhere - I have never, ever been anywhere in Cambodia that gives you a lower price for using Riel (though the accepted informal exchange rate is 4,000 Riel to the Dollar - except in the supermarkets where they use 4,100 Riel to the Dollar - so you can squeeze a small amount of benefit from changing dollars to Riel - as the actual rate is about 4,080 Riel to the dollar - as long as you don't spend too much in the supermarkets here).

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I live in Siem Reap. You can spend Baht here but the exchange rates are normally pretty bad in most venues - I have friends who run restaurants, etc. here and they'd rather not deal in Baht unless they have to - so they charge a premium to do so. Go to the Old Market and change your Baht at one of the money changers on the road down the side... shop around and one of them will change at the interbank rate (seriously) so you simply cannot change Baht more cheaply anywhere on earth (including Thailand). I change up with them when I leave for Thailand and change back as soon as I arrive back. US Dollars are accepted everywhere - I have never, ever been anywhere in Cambodia that gives you a lower price for using Riel (though the accepted informal exchange rate is 4,000 Riel to the Dollar - except in the supermarkets where they use 4,100 Riel to the Dollar - so you can squeeze a small amount of benefit from changing dollars to Riel - as the actual rate is about 4,080 Riel to the dollar - as long as you don't spend too much in the supermarkets here).

It's exactly what I do, only the reverse, since I live in Thailand at the moment. I always buy US dollars at the Cambodian money changers. I only use the currencies Cambodians are happy with and the ones I can deal with easily without introducing an extra currency step such as with euros, pounds etc. I haven't been to a border town in a long time.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Most places in Phnom Penh will not accept baht and those that will, do so at a bad exchange rate. Definitely better to change to dollars and easy enough to do. Close to the Thai border it's different and baht is fine.

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  • 4 weeks later...

My experience today (8 May 2015):

- handed the cashier at Yoshinoya a 100USD note for a $7 meal and she gave me change without scrutinising the note or calling for the manager. There were no tears but I wouldnt describe it as 'mint' by any stretch - got it in one of the Central Festival banks so I expected it to be accepted. You obviously dont have to pay that kind of money for lunch here, and a fast food lunch at that, but it was great to get change without the kind of attitude you can cop elsewhere (including Australia) if you hand someone a large bill

- havent tried to pay for anything with baht - received 145USD for 5K baht (xe.com returns a little over 149USD, but that is the wholesale rate for the big players and moneychangers dont work off the hourly price). Clearly, I've timed my arrival to perfection and it would seem prudent to change more baht before it drops below 29USD for 1K baht.

http://www.xe.com/currencycharts/?from=THB&to=USD&view=1Y

- obviously, those same exchange rates will impact what I get from the ATM, but after >11 months of not paying the 'bandit fee' in Thailand it's a bit of a shock to be hit for $4 at an ATM. Such is life - hotels are cheaper, beer is cheaper (even when it rapidly goes up post Happy Hour) and I'll comment on the rest when I have something to comment on :D

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  • 11 months later...

Sorry ? Do you mean that you can withdraw usd at ATMs in Cambodia ?

I forgot to say you can also use Thai atm card to withdraw, you can choose between usd and local currency.

Yes you can get US dollars.

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