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How can I make gravy without Bisto, Oxo cubes, gravy granules etc?

I live waaay up in the boonies and my nearest supermarket is Big C in Nakhon Sawan 125km away.

:o

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billd, you can make a simple gravy from a white sauce.

Saute some minced onions in butter (not alot mind!) then add flour, enough to form a ball of butter and flour. Then, on very low heat, slowly add milk, stirring all the while. Add enough to make it of gravy thickness and then let it simmer on very low heat, adding more milk as needed. If you can get the beef bouillon cubes from your local supermarket, add half of one into it and stir in until dissolved.

Not bad, but make sure you let it simmer a bit or it will taste floury.

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The best way to make gravy is with pan drippings or broth. You can thicken with flour or with cornstarch. To a half-cup of water or milk add 2 TBSP (30 grams?) flour or 1 TBSP cornstarch and shake/stir until no lumps are left. Slowly add to about 1 and a half to 2 cups of simmering pan drippings or broth, stirring constantly. Simmer a few more minutes to get rid of the raw taste of the flour or cornstarch. Using flour makes an opaque gravy, using cornstarch makes a translucent gravy. In smaller proportions this is how you thicken wok juice in a stir-fry to make a nice sauce.

Of course, if you have no pan drippings or broth, best to make milk gravy like SBK suggested.

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billd, you can make a simple gravy from a white sauce.

Saute some minced onions in butter (not alot mind!) then add flour, enough to form a ball of butter and flour. Then, on very low heat, slowly add milk, stirring all the while. Add enough to make it of gravy thickness and then let it simmer on very low heat, adding more milk as needed. If you can get the beef bouillon cubes from your local supermarket, add half of one into it and stir in until dissolved.

Not bad, but make sure you let it simmer a bit or it will taste floury.

Milk has nothing to do with gravy, sorry :o

(Chef) Gerd

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Pan drippings definitely if available if not a stock cube (Knorr - I think they do beef) from local shop. Although it's probably best to mix flour into the warm fats in a pan, you can instead make a suspension of the flour in cool water and after adding fresh water to the fats and bringing to boil, take off the boil and gradually pour and stir in the cold water/flour mix. This is good for thickening anything that is too runny.

You can of course add anything you want to the hot fat - onion, garlic herbs etc and then pour in and reducce some red wine (if it's beef). Remember with wine you must bring it to boil to boil off the alcohol.

Remember to keep any water used for cooking veggies and use that intstead of fresh water.

I personally don't like cornflour as it makes a very "shiny" gravy.

TOPS ofetn stock Bisto gravy powder, not granules, in their display of farang foods

Edited by wilko
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billd, you can make a simple gravy from a white sauce.

Saute some minced onions in butter (not alot mind!) then add flour, enough to form a ball of butter and flour. Then, on very low heat, slowly add milk, stirring all the while. Add enough to make it of gravy thickness and then let it simmer on very low heat, adding more milk as needed. If you can get the beef bouillon cubes from your local supermarket, add half of one into it and stir in until dissolved.

Not bad, but make sure you let it simmer a bit or it will taste floury.

Milk has nothing to do with gravy, sorry :o

(Chef) Gerd

Yep, was wondering about that too.

It wouldn't be gravy with milk like that, thouhg, I think.

I used to make one when I was in the jungle camping. It was not bad, but I'm not sure you'd like to do it like me, though.

I used half Knorr cube, you can find one even in the small grocery store near you.

Use about 250 ml of water, about a glass, that is, boil it and drop that cube in wait until it all dissolved. Then put the heat of, now you got stock.

In another fry pan, few drops of olive oil in your pan then add 2-3 crushed onions and 2-3 crushed garlics, the whole clove of garlic. Wait until they're a little brown then add a little stock, about 50 ml.

Now this is the funny part, do you have chicken? Some kind of grilled chicken you can find on stall anywhere in fresh market.

Chop that chicken into small pieces then put everything in that fry pan with your onions and garlics.

Add a little stock you made, about 100 ml. and stir. Let them simmer up really nice.

Then use some flat object, I use the bottom of my small pot, to crushed everything in that pan.

And after all are well crushed, you let them simmer slowly. Add some salt and pepper if you want.

Leave it on the stove and mix the other 100 ml. of stock you have left with 2 tablespoon of corn flour and mix them together nicely.

Take out all the chicken pieces and onions and garlic then add this corn flour stock in your pan.

Work them up really nice and simmer a little more.

Now you got jungle gravy...

I hope this helps. And I must say my friends love my jungle gravy. :D

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Thanks everybody for the information.

I can cook well enough to keep me happy but my wife dors most of the cooking.

Sometimes I just get the hankering for ..........

I have a shoulder of lamb in the freezer and a convection roaster which I last used 3 years ago but there is only me that would eat lamb.

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Have to chime in a bit about milk in gravy. Not a chef by any stretch of the imagination but growing up I had breakfast gravy (made with milk) pretty much every weekend. On the rare occasion I can find some decent American spiced sausage here in BKK I will actually make a bit myself.

Probably not the type of gravy the OP was thinking about though.

As for it being tasteless – I guess who ever cooked it for you forgot to add any spice. I tend to add quite a bit of black pepper and chili powder when cooking – in addition to the spicy sausage.

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Picky aren't you people? You are assuming the OP has access to pan drippings in the first place. Having lived on a little island that didn't have access to much of anything until fairly recently I have learned to make do with what is available. Sounds to me like the OP doesn't have alot available and this is a simple solution.

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Have to chime in a bit about milk in gravy. Not a chef by any stretch of the imagination but growing up I had breakfast gravy (made with milk) pretty much every weekend. On the rare occasion I can find some decent American spiced sausage here in BKK I will actually make a bit myself.

Probably not the type of gravy the OP was thinking about though.

As for it being tasteless – I guess who ever cooked it for you forgot to add any spice. I tend to add quite a bit of black pepper and chili powder when cooking – in addition to the spicy sausage.

I have to agree with you. I grew up in the south (Texas - US) and had southern fried chicken with chicken gravy regularly (also deep fried pork and pork gravy). Guess I'm not clear on what you mean by 'pan drippings' but I assumed it was what was left in the pan after frying the chicken/pork.

After frying and removing the chicken/pork add a couple of tablespoons of floor, some salt, black pepper (cajun if desire spicy) to the drippings/grease (a few tablespoons), stir until a paste. Add a couple of cups of "milk" (buttermilk even better) and simmer until thickens (individual preference). Usually then put on top of mashed potatoes and/or biscuits. I'm not a chef either but I know what I like and it is far from 'tasteless'.

This type of gravy has been used by countless thousands for generations so something must be right with using milk. However I concede that the British concept of gravy and the Americans are not the same. :o

Edited by tywais
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I make my gravy the same as you tywais but with water instead of milk. It does taste nice.

Unfortunately the times I've encountered the white gravy served with biscuits was in mess halls and the taste left a lot to be desired.

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