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farma, mess hall "food" isn't food. My dad still reminisces fondly of his airforce days: SOS he called it. sh!t on a shingle was the colloquial meaning :o

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I make my gravy the same as you tywais but with water instead of milk. It does taste nice.

The milk gives it a richer texture and taste.

Unfortunately the times I've encountered the white gravy served with biscuits was in mess halls and the taste left a lot to be desired.

Yeah, I remember that stuff too, SOS also pretty bad. :o

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farma, mess hall "food" isn't food. My dad still reminisces fondly of his airforce days: SOS he called it. sh!t on a shingle was the colloquial meaning :o

I'm ex-airforce too, and agree 100%.

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*sigh* What we Yanks call milk gravy is just a variation on what you snobbier chefs call a white sauce when you make it with butter instead of pan drippings. White sauce is the base for an endless variety of other things. Add grated cheese and you have a cheese sauce to make real baked macaroni and cheese. Brown the flour-butter mixture (you chefs call it a roux) in a pan until it is a deep brown before you add the milk and you have the beginning of almost every Cajun or Creole recipe. It also gives ordinary milk gravy a richer color and flavor if you brown the roux. Careful not to burn it! It takes close attention.

If you have had milk gravy and hated it you have had bad milk gravy. Chefs use cream to thicken sauces and gravies and get a similar flavor as milk gravy. It's all in the seasoning used, and that depends on what else you are cooking.

The locally available cubes for soup make a good broth that will make fine gravy, and would be preferred if they are available. SBK's suggestion to make milk gravy was a sound solution to the problem of limited resources.

As for sausage gravy, that should be quite spicy, and made with the pan drippings from browning the sausage. You can't make it properly with link sausage, you need bulk sausage. The gravy should have a distinct flavor of the sausage. If not, you just had bad milk gravy with some sausage thrown in at the last minute.

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*sigh* What we Yanks call milk gravy is just a variation on what you snobbier chefs call a white sauce when you make it with butter instead of pan drippings. White sauce is the base for an endless variety of other things. Add grated cheese and you have a cheese sauce to make real baked macaroni and cheese. Brown the flour-butter mixture (you chefs call it a roux) in a pan until it is a deep brown before you add the milk and you have the beginning of almost every Cajun or Creole recipe. It also gives ordinary milk gravy a richer color and flavor if you brown the roux. Careful not to burn it! It takes close attention.

If you have had milk gravy and hated it you have had bad milk gravy. Chefs use cream to thicken sauces and gravies and get a similar flavor as milk gravy. It's all in the seasoning used, and that depends on what else you are cooking.

The locally available cubes for soup make a good broth that will make fine gravy, and would be preferred if they are available. SBK's suggestion to make milk gravy was a sound solution to the problem of limited resources.

As for sausage gravy, that should be quite spicy, and made with the pan drippings from browning the sausage. You can't make it properly with link sausage, you need bulk sausage. The gravy should have a distinct flavor of the sausage. If not, you just had bad milk gravy with some sausage thrown in at the last minute.

I am one of these "snobier Chefs" :o

Your above mentioned recipe looks ok for me I only can't agree with the name "gravy" for it, sorry.

A white basic sauce we call "veloute" only brown sauces from meat/bones are called "gravy", that's the way we've learned it.

But I still remember when I was "a bit younger :D " my mother used to make this browned flour gravy for sausages or meals where you can't cook any special gravy out of it.

My first posting was not intended to hurt sbk's feelings about her recipe.

Enjoy your dinner tonight!

Gerd

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No hurt feelings, just trying to point out that the OP has said he is in an area where his resources are very limited. Giving him a recipe for such a place was all I had in mind. My experience with making do with what is available has given me some insight into how improvise quite successfully.

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Thanks everybody for the information.

I can cook well enough to keep me happy but my wife dors most of the cooking.

Sometimes I just get the hankering for ..........

I have a shoulder of lamb in the freezer and a convection roaster which I last used 3 years ago but there is only me that would eat lamb.

I was nearly going to come up tomorrow...but I'm not :o Should be soon, put that leg of lamb on hold :D I'll teach you to make gravy at the same time :D

British gravey does'nt have milk, don't know what you do in the States. In the UK it's usually served with a roast, using the meat juces and water from the boiled veg.

Here's mine roast the meat in a pan or tin. Put in a little bit of water and cover with foil.

About half hour before you recon the meat is done, take it out of the oven, remove the foil and drain the juices into something.

If your having roast potato's par boil them for about ten min. Keep the water. I usually boil (only a little bit) the rest of the veg in the same water. When the meat is finnished, poor some of the veg water in the pan and de-glaze, add this to the previously kept juices, (I usually skim the fat of then as I use cornflour to thicken).

Put all the juices in a saucepan, stir and season then mix a couple of table spoons of corn flour with cold water, add this and bring to the boil while stiring vigorously. Add more water or corn flour to get the desired, quantity/thickness.

You can make a rue with flour and fat but I find the cornflour way easier.

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Thanks everybody for the information.

I can cook well enough to keep me happy but my wife dors most of the cooking.

Sometimes I just get the hankering for ..........

I have a shoulder of lamb in the freezer and a convection roaster which I last used 3 years ago but there is only me that would eat lamb.

I was nearly going to come up tomorrow...but I'm not :o Should be soon, put that leg of lamb on hold :D I'll teach you to make gravy at the same time :D

British gravey does'nt have milk, don't know what you do in the States. In the UK it's usually served with a roast, using the meat juces and water from the boiled veg.

Here's mine roast the meat in a pan or tin. Put in a little bit of water and cover with foil.

About half hour before you recon the meat is done, take it out of the oven, remove the foil and drain the juices into something.

If your having roast potato's par boil them for about ten min. Keep the water. I usually boil (only a little bit) the rest of the veg in the same water. When the meat is finnished, poor some of the veg water in the pan and de-glaze, add this to the previously kept juices, (I usually skim the fat of then as I use cornflour to thicken).

Put all the juices in a saucepan, stir and season then mix a couple of table spoons of corn flour with cold water, add this and bring to the boil while stiring vigorously. Add more water or corn flour to get the desired, quantity/thickness.

You can make a rue with flour and fat but I find the cornflour way easier.

Mmmmmmmmmmmmmm............................

This is the only way in my books, I'm a Brit too so I guess I'm picky, mind you Ramdom, I guess some of these here haven't got an oven so they have to make do with the pan, the only way to get propper dripping (meat fat and juice) is from the oven.

Sol.

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Mmmmmmmmmmmmmm............................

This is the only way in my books, I'm a Brit too so I guess I'm picky, mind you Ramdom, I guess some of these here haven't got an oven so they have to make do with the pan, the only way to get propper dripping (meat fat and juice) is from the oven.

Sol.

You can pick a gas oven up for as littlte as about 5000bhat, I think I paid about that for mine, temp controls not that good though, other than that if you want to cook a joint of meat you could try braising it, should get good gravy that way as well.
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Picky aren't you people? You are assuming the OP has access to pan drippings in the first place. Having lived on a little island that didn't have access to much of anything until fairly recently I have learned to make do with what is available. Sounds to me like the OP doesn't have alot available and this is a simple solution.

No I'm not! I recommend a stock and veggie water if no dripping available.

In normal cooking cicles the white gravy you descibe would be referred to as a basic roux sauce - it is the basis for sauces such as cheese, parsley onion, bread etc etc....

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Carefull now, you are stepping on hallowed ground when you start being critical of SOS, it has sustained GIs for generations. I was in the Air Force also, and still have fond memories of it. Except when they made it from left over sandwich cold cuts, yuk not a pretty sight. To fellow lovers of SOS, they make a really good one at the Texas Lone Staar, in Washington Square, Bangkok. A couple of fried eggs on the top and a side of home fried potatoes, now were talking!!! :o

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Carefull now, you are stepping on hallowed ground when you start being critical of SOS, it has sustained GIs for generations. I was in the Air Force also, and still have fond memories of it. Except when they made it from left over sandwich cold cuts, yuk not a pretty sight. To fellow lovers of SOS, they make a really good one at the Texas Lone Staar, in Washington Square, Bangkok. A couple of fried eggs on the top and a side of home fried potatoes, now were talking!!! :o

Are you suggesting then that if we remove this stuff from the menu the GIs will stop turning up all over the world in places where they're not wanted? We might be on to something here!

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