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Maizefarmer

Boreholes

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My In Laws have just had a bore drilled

went down 30m and cost 25000 bht

Pump included.

Of course muggins had to pay,

Now mother in law and sister in law are arguing

over who pays for the Electric.

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My In Laws have just had a bore drilled

went down 30m and cost 25000 bht

Pump included.

Of course muggins had to pay,

Now mother in law and sister in law are arguing

over who pays for the Electric.

I expect muggins will be!

  • Haha 1

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I had always assumed that for more than 10m you would need a submersible pump. However our 30m well was fitted with a "deep well" pump on the surface. It works by pumping some water back down as far as I can tell.

We drilled in the dry season, the guy hit water shallow but kept on going until he was satisfied with the cleanliness of the water coming up (tested by looking at it in a bucket).

Touch wood, no problems so far, though from the smell of the water first thing in the morning I think it has a high iron content. All in was about 10 - 20k I seem to remember....

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I had always assumed that for more than 10m you would need a submersible pump. However our 30m well was fitted with a "deep well" pump on the surface. It works by pumping some water back down as far as I can tell.

We drilled in the dry season, the guy hit water shallow but kept on going until he was satisfied with the cleanliness of the water coming up (tested by looking at it in a bucket).

Touch wood, no problems so far, though from the smell of the water first thing in the morning I think it has a high iron content. All in was about 10 - 20k I seem to remember....

You are correct that a pump which works by sucking water up the pipe can only pump from about 10m and no more. The pump which you describe is called a "jet pump" in the US. They work by pumping water in a small pipe down the well at high pressure which then powers a venturi which gives the oomph needed to push the water up the well pipe. Jet pumps are less efficient than submersible pumps but they are cheaper and I believe you can operate a jet pump in a smaller diameter well casing.

On the other hand...water which is found in porous layers in the ground are often (usually) under pressure and even if your water is coming into your well at 20m (for example) it could be under pressure and it will rise up inside the well casing. In my well for instance the water comes in from a sand layer at about 10 or 11 metres down but it rises up to between about 1 to 3 metres from the surface depending on the season (dry or wet). Because of this the pump which we use is a common centrifugal pump which sucks the water up the pipe and this works fine because really it is only pumping the water from about 3 metres or less.......which works fine.

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Hi all this is a gem of a find for me, thank you for the posts so far.

Ok here is the thing.

My wife and I (got married today) *Grin, well we have the offer to buy 13 Rai of land near her home village, the deal is quite good for the amount of land but my hesitation is that they only farm rice there once a year because of the water shortage. The village is near Sisaket and so mostly its dry as a sand dune. Can anyone give me an idea of what kind of set up I would need to water 13 rai of land, or at least some of it?

And also if anyone knows of borehole drillers in that area?

I saw the link to the http://hydra-jett.com/ (nice link thanks)

But until I can find out about water tables in the area etc I dont want to go spending on a drilling rig.

(Mind it would be nice to have in the shed.)

I don't know about rice growing yet, so I have some homework to do on how much water it takes to see if its a viable crop, but any help would be appreciated.

Many thanks

Edited by Ed.Lee

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Hi Ed

I'm not really sure of the viability of irrigating 13 rai of rice with a borehole, mostly they they irrigate rice paddy from canals or rivers.

As for drilling companies your probaly better to ask around localy, find out if other people have one and who drilled it and start from there. The chances are if no one has one then it's for a reason.

Oh congrats on the marrage

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If no one is raising rice there now (during the rainy season) it is a good bet that it is not practical....I could be wrong on this but it seems to me that all of the rice land that can produce rice with the current irrigation canals is already being used. I'm not sure but I think that if you had to pump all of the water for rice that it would not be practical...unless you only had to raise the water a very small amount...like one metre or so....but again I could be wrong on this.

Mostly I see people using the large diameter tube pumps (which can not be used in a bore hole...you've got to have a pond or river for these) to water other crops which require less water and generate more income per rai than rice. I could be wrong on this though so you should ask around. I have a tube pump and use it mostly in the dry season to water other crops...not rice. In a very dry year I may use the tube pump to get me through a short period when no water comes in the irrigation canal and no rain falls especially if this should occur when the rice plants are flowering or making the grain.

Chownah

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^ don't you need to flood the paddy as some point ? By my reconing to raise 13 rai by just 1cm would take 208 cubic meters of water, just don't think it wold be possible with a bore, it would have to be pumping 24hrs a day.

Oh I think you should do a post on rice farming as we have'nt got much on it

Edited by RamdomChances

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That is how all the rice (millions of acres) is grown in the Mississippi Delta.Often pumping 24/7

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That is how all the rice (millions of acres) is grown in the Mississippi Delta.Often pumping 24/7

Mobaan,

Isn't the Mississippi delta a flood plain so the water table is nearly at ground level? Any idea how much they need to lift the water? The less verticle distance you need to lift the water the more practical pumping for rice becomes and the higher the water table the lower the rate of infiltration (usually) and the more practival pumping for rice becomes. I'm not disagreeing with what you have said...I'm just wondering if you have any figures on pumping heights and water table height.

Chownah

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Ok lots of interesting posts, many thanks.

As I said they have rice growing now, thats the only time of the year. There is a large resivoir/lake thing but even that isn't used for irrigation and unfortunately for me the preposed land is in the opposite direction. I am looking at trying to secure some of the land near the resivoir. Will make life a hel_l of a lot easier.

The thing is, most of the villagers dont work for most of the year becasue there is no water for crop growing, I hoped that if boreholes were possible it could lead to a injection for the local economy.

*Shrug, We will come up with some sort of plan.

I always do, even if its completely different to the origonal one.

*Smile

Thanks for all the help peeps.

Any further advice is welcomed.

Blessings

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Ed.Lee,

Rice takes ALOT of water. That's why the borehole is probably not practical for rice cropping. There are lots of crops that don't take so much water and if you can develop a bore hole I'm reasonably sure that there would be some crops that you could do economically.

The economics of irrigation is partly driven by the cost of the power to do the pumping whether it be electricity or diesel or wind or solar. The higher you must lift the water from its surface in the well to the surface of the land the more energy it will take and so the more will be the expense.

To know which crops you could grow you must first know how deep the water must be pumped from and how much water you can reliably pump at the time of the year you will be growing. Even a well that produces abundant water part of the year but not in the dry season might be beneficial in that it could give you a short extra season at the end of the rice season even if it dries up completely in the dry season....but of course the more marginal the water supply the more marginal will be its usefullness.

Good luck and keep us informed.

Chownah

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Thanks chownah and everyone else too.

I am off to Laos tonight for a visa thingy and once I get back the wife and I are off to Sisaket and I'll do some info gathering.

Have a good week and be safe.

Blessings

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The water that comes out is only fit for garden as it has a heavy magnesium content (good for plants but no good for a cuppa!) If I went deeper would I hit water more suitable for domestic use or is it possible for current supply to be filtered so it is suitable for home use?

Thanks

TBWG :o

You can get relatively cheap Reverse Osmosis equipment now which will clean the water for you.

High in Magnesium will block up your RO membrane very quickly.

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